ia64/xen-unstable

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author iap10@labyrinth.cl.cam.ac.uk
date Thu May 13 10:17:36 2004 +0000 (2004-05-13)
parents 6532f3f768df
children
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1 # Maintained by:
2 # Eric S. Raymond <mailto:esr@thyrsus.com>
3 # Steven Cole <mailto:elenstev@mesatop.com>
4 #
5 # Translations of this file available on the WWW:
6 #
7 # - Japanese, maintained by the JF Project <mailto:JF@linux.or.jp>, at
8 # <http://www.linux.or.jp/JF/JFdocs/Configure.help/>
9 # - Russian, by <mailto:kaf@linux.nevod.perm.su>, at
10 # <http://nevod.perm.su/service/linux/doc/kernel/Configure.help>
11 # - French, by Pierre Tane <mailto:tanep@bigfoot.com>, at
12 # <http://www.traduc.org/kernelfr/>
13 # - Polish, by Dominik Mierzejewski <mailto:dominik@piorunek.pl>, at
14 # <http://www.piorunek.pl/~dominik/linux/kernel/>
15 # - German, by SuSE, at <http://www.suse.de/~ke/kernel/>. This patch
16 # also includes infrastructure to support different languages.
17 # - Catalan, by Antoni Bella <mailto:bella5@teleline.es>, at
18 # <http://www.terra.es/personal7/bella5/traduccions.htm>
19 #
20 # Information about what a kernel is, what it does, how to patch and
21 # compile it and much more is contained in the Kernel-HOWTO, available
22 # at <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Before you start
23 # compiling, make sure that you have the necessary versions of all
24 # programs and libraries required to compile and run this kernel; they
25 # are listed in the <file:Documentation/Changes>. Make sure to read the
26 # toplevel kernel README file as well.
27 #
28 # Format of this file: description<nl>variable<nl>help text<nl><nl>.
29 # The help texts may contain empty lines, but every non-empty line must
30 # be indented two positions. Order of the help texts does not matter,
31 # however, no variable should be documented twice: if it is, only the
32 # first occurrence will be used. We try to keep the help texts of related
33 # variables close together. Lines starting with `#' are ignored. To be
34 # nice to menuconfig, limit your line length to 70 characters. Use emacs'
35 # kfill.el to edit and ispell.el to spell check this file or you lose.
36 #
37 # Comments of the form "# Choice:" followed by a menu name are used
38 # internally by the maintainers' consistency-checking tools.
39 #
40 # If you add a help text to this file, please try to be as gentle as
41 # possible. Don't use unexplained acronyms and generally write for the
42 # hypothetical ignorant but intelligent user who has just bought a PC,
43 # removed Windows, installed Linux and is now recompiling the kernel
44 # for the first time. Tell them what to do if they're unsure. Technical
45 # information should go in a README in the Documentation directory.
46 #
47 # Mention all the relevant READMEs and HOWTOs in the help text.
48 # Make them file URLs relative to the top level of the source tree so
49 # that help browsers can turn them into hotlinks. All URLs should be
50 # surrounded by <>.
51 #
52 # Repetitions are fine since the help texts are not meant to be read
53 # in sequence. It is good style to include URLs pointing to more
54 # detailed technical information, pictures of the hardware, etc.
55 #
56 # The most important thing to include in a help entry is *motivation*.
57 # Explain why someone configuring a kernel might want to select your
58 # option.
59 #
60 # All this was shamelessly stolen from numerous different sources. Many
61 # thanks to all the contributors. Feel free to use these help texts in
62 # your own kernel configuration tools. The texts are copyrighted (c)
63 # 1995-2000 by Axel Boldt and many others and are governed by the GNU
64 # General Public License.
66 Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
67 CONFIG_EXPERIMENTAL
68 Some of the various things that Linux supports (such as network
69 drivers, file systems, network protocols, etc.) can be in a state
70 of development where the functionality, stability, or the level of
71 testing is not yet high enough for general use. This is usually
72 known as the "alpha-test" phase among developers. If a feature is
73 currently in alpha-test, then the developers usually discourage
74 uninformed widespread use of this feature by the general public to
75 avoid "Why doesn't this work?" type mail messages. However, active
76 testing and use of these systems is welcomed. Just be aware that it
77 may not meet the normal level of reliability or it may fail to work
78 in some special cases. Detailed bug reports from people familiar
79 with the kernel internals are usually welcomed by the developers
80 (before submitting bug reports, please read the documents
81 <file:README>, <file:MAINTAINERS>, <file:REPORTING-BUGS>,
82 <file:Documentation/BUG-HUNTING>, and
83 <file:Documentation/oops-tracing.txt> in the kernel source).
85 This option will also make obsoleted drivers available. These are
86 drivers that have been replaced by something else, and/or are
87 scheduled to be removed in a future kernel release.
89 Unless you intend to help test and develop a feature or driver that
90 falls into this category, or you have a situation that requires
91 using these features, you should probably say N here, which will
92 cause the configurator to present you with fewer choices. If
93 you say Y here, you will be offered the choice of using features or
94 drivers that are currently considered to be in the alpha-test phase.
96 Prompt for drivers for obsolete features and hardware
97 CONFIG_OBSOLETE
98 Obsolete drivers have usually been replaced by more recent software
99 that can talk to the same hardware. Obsolete hardware is things
100 like MGA monitors that you are very unlikely to see on today's
101 systems.
103 Prompt for advanced kernel configuration options
104 CONFIG_ADVANCED_OPTIONS
105 This option will enable prompting for a variety of advanced kernel
106 configuration options. These options can cause the kernel to not
107 work if they are set incorrectly, but can be used to optimize certain
108 aspects of kernel memory management.
110 Unless you know what you are doing you *should not* enable this option.
112 Symmetric Multi-Processing support
113 CONFIG_SMP
114 This enables support for systems with more than one CPU. If you have
115 a system with only one CPU, like most personal computers, say N. If
116 you have a system with more than one CPU, say Y.
118 If you say N here, the kernel will run on single and multiprocessor
119 machines, but will use only one CPU of a multiprocessor machine. If
120 you say Y here, the kernel will run on many, but not all,
121 single machines. On a singleprocessor machine, the kernel
122 will run faster if you say N here.
124 Note that if you say Y here and choose architecture "586" or
125 "Pentium" under "Processor family", the kernel will not work on 486
126 architectures. Similarly, multiprocessor kernels for the "PPro"
127 architecture may not work on all Pentium based boards.
129 People using multiprocessor machines who say Y here should also say
130 Y to "Enhanced Real Time Clock Support", below. The "Advanced Power
131 Management" code will be disabled if you say Y here.
133 See also the <file:Documentation/smp.tex>,
134 <file:Documentation/smp.txt>, <file:Documentation/i386/IO-APIC.txt>,
135 <file:Documentation/nmi_watchdog.txt> and the SMP-HOWTO available at
136 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
138 If you don't know what to do here, say N.
140 Maximum number of CPUs
141 CONFIG_NR_CPUS
142 This allows you to specify the maximum number of CPUs which this
143 kernel will support. The maximum supported value is 32 and the
144 mimimum value which makes sense is 2.
146 This is purely to save memory - each supported CPU adds
147 approximately eight kilobytes to the kernel image.
149 Intel or compatible 80x86 processor
150 CONFIG_X86
151 This is Linux's home port. Linux was originally native to the Intel
152 386, and runs on all the later x86 processors including the Intel
153 486, 586, Pentiums, and various instruction-set-compatible chips by
154 AMD, Cyrix, and others.
156 Alpha processor
157 CONFIG_ALPHA
158 The Alpha is a 64-bit general-purpose processor designed and
159 marketed by the Digital Equipment Corporation of blessed memory, now
160 Compaq. Alpha Linux dates from 1995-1996 and was the first non-x86
161 port. The Alpha Linux project has a home page at
162 <http://www.alphalinux.org/>.
164 32-bit Sun Sparc
165 CONFIG_SPARC32
166 SPARC is a family of RISC microprocessors designed and marketed by
167 Sun Microsystems, incorporated. They are very widely found in Sun
168 workstations and clones. This port covers the original 32-bit SPARC;
169 it is old and stable and usually considered one of the "big three"
170 along with the Intel and Alpha ports. The UltraLinux project
171 maintains both the SPARC32 and SPARC64 ports; its web page is
172 available at <http://www.ultralinux.org/>.
174 64-bit Sun Sparc
175 CONFIG_SPARC64
176 SPARC is a family of RISC microprocessors designed and marketed by
177 Sun Microsystems, incorporated. This port covers the newer 64-bit
178 UltraSPARC. The UltraLinux project maintains both the SPARC32 and
179 SPARC64 ports; its web page is available at
180 <http://www.ultralinux.org/>.
182 Power PC processor
183 CONFIG_PPC
184 The PowerPC is a very capable 32-bit RISC processor from Motorola,
185 the successor to their 68000 and 88000 series. It powers recent
186 Macintoshes and also a widely-used series of single-board computers
187 from Motorola. The Linux PowerPC port has a home page at
188 <http://penguinppc.org/>.
190 Motorola 68K processors
191 CONFIG_M68K
192 The Motorola 68K microprocessors are now obsolete, having been
193 superseded by the PowerPC line also from Motorola. But they powered
194 the first wave of workstation hardware in the 1980s, including Sun
195 workstations; they were also the basis of the original Amiga and
196 later Atari personal computers. A lot of this hardware is still
197 around. The m68k project has a home page at
198 <http://www.linux-m68k.org/>.
200 ARM processors
201 CONFIG_ARM
202 The ARM series is a line of low-power-consumption RISC chip designs
203 licensed by ARM ltd and targeted at embedded applications and
204 handhelds such as the Compaq IPAQ. ARM-based PCs are no longer
205 manufactured, but legacy ARM-based PC hardware remains popular in
206 Europe. There is an ARM Linux project with a web page at
207 <http://www.arm.linux.org.uk/>.
209 SuperH processors
210 CONFIG_SUPERH
211 The SuperH is a RISC processor targeted for use in embedded systems
212 and consumer electronics; it was also used in the Sega Dreamcast
213 gaming console. The SuperH port has a home page at
214 <http://www.sh-linux.org/>.
216 IA64 processors, including Intel Itanium
217 CONFIG_IA64
218 The Itanium is Intel's 64-bit successor to the 32-bit X86 line. As
219 of early 2001 it is not yet in widespread production use. The Linux
220 IA-64 project has a home page at <http://www.linuxia64.org/>.
222 HP PA-RISC processor
223 CONFIG_PARISC
224 The PA-RISC microprocessor is a RISC chip designed by
225 Hewlett-Packard and used in their line of workstations. The PA-RISC
226 Linux project has a home page at <www.parisc-linux.org>.
228 IBM System/390
229 CONFIG_S390
230 Linux now runs on the venerable System/390 mainframe from IBM, in a
231 guest partition under VM. In fact, over 40,000 simultaneous Linux
232 images have been run on a single mainframe! The S390 Linux project
233 has a home page at <http://linux.s390.org/>.
235 Axis Communications ETRAX 100LX embedded network CPU
236 CONFIG_CRIS
237 Linux has been ported to run on the Axis Communications ETRAX 100LX
238 CPU and the single-board computers built around it, targeted for
239 network and embedded applications. For more information see the
240 Axis Communication site, <http://developer.axis.com/>.
242 Unsynced TSC support
243 CONFIG_X86_TSC_DISABLE
244 This option is used for getting Linux to run on a NUMA multi-node
245 boxes, laptops and other systems suffering from unsynced TSCs or
246 TSC drift, which can cause gettimeofday to return non-monotonic values.
247 Choosing this option will disable the CONFIG_X86_TSC optimization,
248 and allows you to then specify "notsc" as a boot option regardless of
249 which processor you have compiled for.
251 NOTE: If your system hangs when init should run, you are probably
252 using a i686 compiled glibc which reads the TSC without checking for
253 availability. Boot without "notsc" and install a i386 compiled glibc
254 to solve the problem.
256 If unsure, say N.
258 Multiquad support for NUMAQ systems
259 CONFIG_X86_NUMAQ
260 This option is used for getting Linux to run on a (IBM/Sequent) NUMA
261 multiquad box. This changes the way that processors are bootstrapped,
262 and uses Clustered Logical APIC addressing mode instead of Flat Logical.
263 You will need a new lynxer.elf file to flash your firmware with - send
264 email to Martin.Bligh@us.ibm.com
266 Support for IBM Summit (EXA) systems
267 CONFIG_X86_SUMMIT
268 This option is needed for IBM systems that use the Summit/EXA chipset.
269 (EXA: Extendable Xseries Architecture)In particular, it is needed for
270 the x440 (even for the 4-CPU model).
272 If you don't have this computer, you may safely say N.
274 IO-APIC support on uniprocessors
275 CONFIG_X86_UP_IOAPIC
276 An IO-APIC (I/O Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller) is an
277 SMP-capable replacement for PC-style interrupt controllers. Most
278 SMP systems and a small number of uniprocessor systems have one.
279 If you have a single-CPU system with an IO-APIC, you can say Y here
280 to use it. If you say Y here even though your machine doesn't have
281 an IO-APIC, then the kernel will still run with no slowdown at all.
283 If you have a system with several CPUs, you do not need to say Y
284 here: the IO-APIC will be used automatically.
286 Local APIC Support on Uniprocessors
287 CONFIG_X86_UP_APIC
288 A local APIC (Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller) is an
289 integrated interrupt controller in the CPU. If you have a single-CPU
290 system which has a processor with a local APIC, you can say Y here to
291 enable and use it. If you say Y here even though your machine doesn't
292 have a local APIC, then the kernel will still run with no slowdown at
293 all. The local APIC supports CPU-generated self-interrupts (timer,
294 performance counters), and the NMI watchdog which detects hard lockups.
296 If you have a system with several CPUs, you do not need to say Y
297 here: the local APIC will be used automatically.
299 Kernel math emulation
300 CONFIG_MATH_EMULATION
301 Linux can emulate a math coprocessor (used for floating point
302 operations) if you don't have one. 486DX and Pentium processors have
303 a math coprocessor built in, 486SX and 386 do not, unless you added
304 a 487DX or 387, respectively. (The messages during boot time can
305 give you some hints here ["man dmesg"].) Everyone needs either a
306 coprocessor or this emulation.
308 If you don't have a math coprocessor, you need to say Y here; if you
309 say Y here even though you have a coprocessor, the coprocessor will
310 be used nevertheless. (This behaviour can be changed with the kernel
311 command line option "no387", which comes handy if your coprocessor
312 is broken. Try "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot
313 loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to pass options to the kernel at
314 boot time.) This means that it is a good idea to say Y here if you
315 intend to use this kernel on different machines.
317 More information about the internals of the Linux math coprocessor
318 emulation can be found in <file:arch/i386/math-emu/README>.
320 If you are not sure, say Y; apart from resulting in a 66 KB bigger
321 kernel, it won't hurt.
323 Timer and CPU usage LEDs
324 CONFIG_LEDS
325 If you say Y here, the LEDs on your machine will be used
326 to provide useful information about your current system status.
328 If you are compiling a kernel for a NetWinder or EBSA-285, you will
329 be able to select which LEDs are active using the options below. If
330 you are compiling a kernel for the EBSA-110 or the LART however, the
331 red LED will simply flash regularly to indicate that the system is
332 still functional. It is safe to say Y here if you have a CATS
333 system, but the driver will do nothing.
335 Timer LED
336 CONFIG_LEDS_TIMER
337 If you say Y here, one of the system LEDs (the green one on the
338 NetWinder, the amber one on the EBSA285, or the red one on the LART)
339 will flash regularly to indicate that the system is still
340 operational. This is mainly useful to kernel hackers who are
341 debugging unstable kernels.
343 The LART uses the same LED for both Timer LED and CPU usage LED
344 functions. You may choose to use both, but the Timer LED function
345 will overrule the CPU usage LED.
347 CPU usage LED
348 CONFIG_LEDS_CPU
349 If you say Y here, the red LED will be used to give a good real
350 time indication of CPU usage, by lighting whenever the idle task
351 is not currently executing.
353 The LART uses the same LED for both Timer LED and CPU usage LED
354 functions. You may choose to use both, but the Timer LED function
355 will overrule the CPU usage LED.
357 Kernel FP software completion
358 CONFIG_MATHEMU
359 This option is required for IEEE compliant floating point arithmetic
360 on the Alpha. The only time you would ever not say Y is to say M in
361 order to debug the code. Say Y unless you know what you are doing.
363 # Choice: himem
364 High Memory support
365 CONFIG_NOHIGHMEM
366 Linux can use up to 64 Gigabytes of physical memory on x86 systems.
367 However, the address space of 32-bit x86 processors is only 4
368 Gigabytes large. That means that, if you have a large amount of
369 physical memory, not all of it can be "permanently mapped" by the
370 kernel. The physical memory that's not permanently mapped is called
371 "high memory".
373 If you are compiling a kernel which will never run on a machine with
374 more than 960 megabytes of total physical RAM, answer "off" here (default
375 choice and suitable for most users). This will result in a "3GB/1GB"
376 split: 3GB are mapped so that each process sees a 3GB virtual memory
377 space and the remaining part of the 4GB virtual memory space is used
378 by the kernel to permanently map as much physical memory as
379 possible.
381 If the machine has between 1 and 4 Gigabytes physical RAM, then
382 answer "4GB" here.
384 If more than 4 Gigabytes is used then answer "64GB" here. This
385 selection turns Intel PAE (Physical Address Extension) mode on.
386 PAE implements 3-level paging on IA32 processors. PAE is fully
387 supported by Linux, PAE mode is implemented on all recent Intel
388 processors (Pentium Pro and better). NOTE: If you say "64GB" here,
389 then the kernel will not boot on CPUs that don't support PAE!
391 The actual amount of total physical memory will either be auto
392 detected or can be forced by using a kernel command line option such
393 as "mem=256M". (Try "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your
394 boot loader (grub, lilo or loadlin) about how to pass options to the
395 kernel at boot time.)
397 If unsure, say "off".
399 4GB
400 CONFIG_HIGHMEM4G
401 Select this if you have a 32-bit processor and between 1 and 4
402 gigabytes of physical RAM.
404 64GB
405 CONFIG_HIGHMEM64G
406 Select this if you have a 32-bit processor and more than 4
407 gigabytes of physical RAM.
409 HIGHMEM I/O support
410 CONFIG_HIGHIO
411 If you want to be able to do I/O to high memory pages, say Y.
412 Otherwise low memory pages are used as bounce buffers causing a
413 degrade in performance.
415 OOM killer support
416 CONFIG_OOM_KILLER
417 This option selects the kernel behaviour during total out of memory
418 condition.
420 The default behaviour is to, as soon as no freeable memory and no swap
421 space are available, kill the task which tries to allocate memory.
422 The default behaviour is very reliable.
424 If you select this option, as soon as no freeable memory is available,
425 the kernel will try to select the "best" task to be killed.
427 If unsure, say N.
429 Normal floppy disk support
430 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_FD
431 If you want to use the floppy disk drive(s) of your PC under Linux,
432 say Y. Information about this driver, especially important for IBM
433 Thinkpad users, is contained in <file:Documentation/floppy.txt>.
434 That file also contains the location of the Floppy driver FAQ as
435 well as location of the fdutils package used to configure additional
436 parameters of the driver at run time.
438 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
439 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
440 The module will be called floppy.o. If you want to compile it as a
441 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
443 iSeries Virtual I/O Disk Support
444 CONFIG_VIODASD
445 If you are running on an iSeries system and you want to use
446 virtual disks created and managed by OS/400, say Y.
448 iSeries Virtual I/O Disk IDE Emulation
449 CONFIG_VIODASD_IDE
450 This causes the iSeries virtual disks to look like IDE disks.
451 If you have programs or utilities that only support certain
452 kinds of disks, this option will cause iSeries virtual disks
453 to pretend to be IDE disks, which may satisfy the program.
455 Support for PowerMac floppy
456 CONFIG_MAC_FLOPPY
457 If you have a SWIM-3 (Super Woz Integrated Machine 3; from Apple)
458 floppy controller, say Y here. Most commonly found in PowerMacs.
460 RAM disk support
461 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM
462 Saying Y here will allow you to use a portion of your RAM memory as
463 a block device, so that you can make file systems on it, read and
464 write to it and do all the other things that you can do with normal
465 block devices (such as hard drives). It is usually used to load and
466 store a copy of a minimal root file system off of a floppy into RAM
467 during the initial install of Linux.
469 Note that the kernel command line option "ramdisk=XX" is now
470 obsolete. For details, read <file:Documentation/ramdisk.txt>.
472 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
473 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
474 say M and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be
475 called rd.o.
477 Most normal users won't need the RAM disk functionality, and can
478 thus say N here.
480 Default RAM disk size
481 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM_SIZE
482 The default value is 4096. Only change this if you know what are
483 you doing. If you are using IBM S/390, then set this to 8192.
485 Initial RAM disk (initrd) support
486 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_INITRD
487 The initial RAM disk is a RAM disk that is loaded by the boot loader
488 (loadlin or lilo) and that is mounted as root before the normal boot
489 procedure. It is typically used to load modules needed to mount the
490 "real" root file system, etc. See <file:Documentation/initrd.txt>
491 for details.
493 Embed root filesystem ramdisk into the kernel
494 CONFIG_EMBEDDED_RAMDISK
495 Select this option if you want to build the ramdisk image into the
496 the final kernel binary.
498 Filename of gziped ramdisk image
499 CONFIG_EMBEDDED_RAMDISK_IMAGE
500 This is the filename of the ramdisk image to be built into the
501 kernel. Relative pathnames are relative to arch/mips/ramdisk/.
502 The ramdisk image is not part of the kernel distribution; you must
503 provide one yourself.
505 Loopback device support
506 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_LOOP
507 Saying Y here will allow you to use a regular file as a block
508 device; you can then create a file system on that block device and
509 mount it just as you would mount other block devices such as hard
510 drive partitions, CD-ROM drives or floppy drives. The loop devices
511 are block special device files with major number 7 and typically
512 called /dev/loop0, /dev/loop1 etc.
514 This is useful if you want to check an ISO 9660 file system before
515 burning the CD, or if you want to use floppy images without first
516 writing them to floppy. Furthermore, some Linux distributions avoid
517 the need for a dedicated Linux partition by keeping their complete
518 root file system inside a DOS FAT file using this loop device
519 driver.
521 The loop device driver can also be used to "hide" a file system in a
522 disk partition, floppy, or regular file, either using encryption
523 (scrambling the data) or steganography (hiding the data in the low
524 bits of, say, a sound file). This is also safe if the file resides
525 on a remote file server. If you want to do this, you will first have
526 to acquire and install a kernel patch from
527 <ftp://ftp.kerneli.org/pub/kerneli/>, and then you need to
528 say Y to this option.
530 Note that alternative ways to use encrypted file systems are
531 provided by the cfs package, which can be gotten from
532 <ftp://ftp.kerneli.org/pub/kerneli/net-source/>, and the newer tcfs
533 package, available at <http://tcfs.dia.unisa.it/>. You do not need
534 to say Y here if you want to use one of these. However, using cfs
535 requires saying Y to "NFS file system support" below while using
536 tcfs requires applying a kernel patch. An alternative steganography
537 solution is provided by StegFS, also available from
538 <ftp://ftp.kerneli.org/pub/kerneli/net-source/>.
540 To use the loop device, you need the losetup utility and a recent
541 version of the mount program, both contained in the util-linux
542 package. The location and current version number of util-linux is
543 contained in the file <file:Documentation/Changes>.
545 Note that this loop device has nothing to do with the loopback
546 device used for network connections from the machine to itself.
548 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
549 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
550 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
551 will be called loop.o.
553 Most users will answer N here.
555 Micro Memory MM5415 Battery Backed RAM support (EXPERIMENTAL)
556 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_UMEM
557 Saying Y here will include support for the MM5415 family of
558 battery backed (Non-volatile) RAM cards.
559 <http://www.umem.com/>
561 The cards appear as block devices that can be partitioned into
562 as many as 15 partitions.
564 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
565 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
566 say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be
567 called umem.o.
569 The umem driver has been allocated block major number 116.
570 See Documentation/devices.txt for recommended device naming.
572 Network block device support
573 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_NBD
574 Saying Y here will allow your computer to be a client for network
575 block devices, i.e. it will be able to use block devices exported by
576 servers (mount file systems on them etc.). Communication between
577 client and server works over TCP/IP networking, but to the client
578 program this is hidden: it looks like a regular local file access to
579 a block device special file such as /dev/nd0.
581 Network block devices also allows you to run a block-device in
582 userland (making server and client physically the same computer,
583 communicating using the loopback network device).
585 Read <file:Documentation/nbd.txt> for more information, especially
586 about where to find the server code, which runs in user space and
587 does not need special kernel support.
589 Note that this has nothing to do with the network file systems NFS
590 or Coda; you can say N here even if you intend to use NFS or Coda.
592 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
593 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
594 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
595 will be called nbd.o.
597 If unsure, say N.
599 XenoLinux virtual block device support
600 CONFIG_XEN_VBD
601 Xen can export virtual block devices which map back to extents of
602 blocks on the physical partitions. This option is needed for
603 Linux to make use of such devices when running as a Xen guest.
605 If unsure, say Y.
607 Per partition statistics in /proc/partitions
608 CONFIG_BLK_STATS
609 If you say yes here, your kernel will keep statistical information
610 for every partition. The information includes things as numbers of
611 read and write accesses, the number of merged requests etc.
613 This is required for the full functionality of sar(8) and interesting
614 if you want to do performance tuning, by tweaking the elevator, e.g.
616 If unsure, say N.
618 ATA/IDE/MFM/RLL support
619 CONFIG_IDE
620 If you say Y here, your kernel will be able to manage low cost mass
621 storage units such as ATA/(E)IDE and ATAPI units. The most common
622 cases are IDE hard drives and ATAPI CD-ROM drives.
624 If your system is pure SCSI and doesn't use these interfaces, you
625 can say N here.
627 Integrated Disk Electronics (IDE aka ATA-1) is a connecting standard
628 for mass storage units such as hard disks. It was designed by
629 Western Digital and Compaq Computer in 1984. It was then named
630 ST506. Quite a number of disks use the IDE interface.
632 AT Attachment (ATA) is the superset of the IDE specifications.
633 ST506 was also called ATA-1.
635 Fast-IDE is ATA-2 (also named Fast ATA), Enhanced IDE (EIDE) is
636 ATA-3. It provides support for larger disks (up to 8.4GB by means of
637 the LBA standard), more disks (4 instead of 2) and for other mass
638 storage units such as tapes and cdrom. UDMA/33 (aka UltraDMA/33) is
639 ATA-4 and provides faster (and more CPU friendly) transfer modes
640 than previous PIO (Programmed processor Input/Output) from previous
641 ATA/IDE standards by means of fast DMA controllers.
643 ATA Packet Interface (ATAPI) is a protocol used by EIDE tape and
644 CD-ROM drives, similar in many respects to the SCSI protocol.
646 SMART IDE (Self Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) was
647 designed in order to prevent data corruption and disk crash by
648 detecting pre hardware failure conditions (heat, access time, and
649 the like...). Disks built since June 1995 may follow this standard.
650 The kernel itself don't manage this; however there are quite a
651 number of user programs such as smart that can query the status of
652 SMART parameters disk.
654 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
655 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
656 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
657 will be called ide.o.
659 For further information, please read <file:Documentation/ide.txt>.
661 If unsure, say Y.
663 Enhanced IDE/MFM/RLL disk/cdrom/tape/floppy support
664 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE
665 If you say Y here, you will use the full-featured IDE driver to
666 control up to ten ATA/IDE interfaces, each being able to serve a
667 "master" and a "slave" device, for a total of up to twenty ATA/IDE
668 disk/cdrom/tape/floppy drives.
670 Useful information about large (>540 MB) IDE disks, multiple
671 interfaces, what to do if ATA/IDE devices are not automatically
672 detected, sound card ATA/IDE ports, module support, and other
673 topics, is contained in <file:Documentation/ide.txt>. For detailed
674 information about hard drives, consult the Disk-HOWTO and the
675 Multi-Disk-HOWTO, available from
676 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
678 To fine-tune ATA/IDE drive/interface parameters for improved
679 performance, look for the hdparm package at
680 <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/hardware/>.
682 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
683 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
684 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
685 <file:Documentation/ide.txt>. The module will be called ide-mod.o.
686 Do not compile this driver as a module if your root file system (the
687 one containing the directory /) is located on an IDE device.
689 If you have one or more IDE drives, say Y or M here. If your system
690 has no IDE drives, or if memory requirements are really tight, you
691 could say N here, and select the "Old hard disk driver" below
692 instead to save about 13 KB of memory in the kernel.
694 Old hard disk (MFM/RLL/IDE) driver
695 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HD_ONLY
696 There are two drivers for MFM/RLL/IDE hard disks. Most people use
697 the newer enhanced driver, but this old one is still around for two
698 reasons. Some older systems have strange timing problems and seem to
699 work only with the old driver (which itself does not work with some
700 newer systems). The other reason is that the old driver is smaller,
701 since it lacks the enhanced functionality of the new one. This makes
702 it a good choice for systems with very tight memory restrictions, or
703 for systems with only older MFM/RLL/ESDI drives. Choosing the old
704 driver can save 13 KB or so of kernel memory.
706 If you are unsure, then just choose the Enhanced IDE/MFM/RLL driver
707 instead of this one. For more detailed information, read the
708 Disk-HOWTO, available from
709 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
711 Use old disk-only driver on primary interface
712 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HD_IDE
713 There are two drivers for MFM/RLL/IDE disks. Most people use just
714 the new enhanced driver by itself. This option however installs the
715 old hard disk driver to control the primary IDE/disk interface in
716 the system, leaving the new enhanced IDE driver to take care of only
717 the 2nd/3rd/4th IDE interfaces. Doing this will prevent you from
718 having an IDE/ATAPI CD-ROM or tape drive connected to the primary
719 IDE interface. Choosing this option may be useful for older systems
720 which have MFM/RLL/ESDI controller+drives at the primary port
721 address (0x1f0), along with IDE drives at the secondary/3rd/4th port
722 addresses.
724 Normally, just say N here; you will then use the new driver for all
725 4 interfaces.
727 Include IDE/ATA-2 DISK support
728 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDISK
729 This will include enhanced support for MFM/RLL/IDE hard disks. If
730 you have a MFM/RLL/IDE disk, and there is no special reason to use
731 the old hard disk driver instead, say Y. If you have an SCSI-only
732 system, you can say N here.
734 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
735 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
736 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
737 will be called ide-disk.o. Do not compile this driver as a module
738 if your root file system (the one containing the directory /) is
739 located on the IDE disk. If unsure, say Y.
741 Use multi-mode by default
742 CONFIG_IDEDISK_MULTI_MODE
743 If you get this error, try to say Y here:
745 hda: set_multmode: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete Error }
746 hda: set_multmode: error=0x04 { DriveStatusError }
748 If in doubt, say N.
750 PCMCIA IDE support
751 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDECS
752 Support for outboard IDE disks, tape drives, and CD-ROM drives
753 connected through a PCMCIA card.
755 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
756 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
757 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
758 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
759 ide-cs.o
761 Include IDE/ATAPI CD-ROM support
762 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDECD
763 If you have a CD-ROM drive using the ATAPI protocol, say Y. ATAPI is
764 a newer protocol used by IDE CD-ROM and TAPE drives, similar to the
765 SCSI protocol. Most new CD-ROM drives use ATAPI, including the
766 NEC-260, Mitsumi FX400, Sony 55E, and just about all non-SCSI
767 double(2X) or better speed drives.
769 If you say Y here, the CD-ROM drive will be identified at boot time
770 along with other IDE devices, as "hdb" or "hdc", or something
771 similar (check the boot messages with dmesg). If this is your only
772 CD-ROM drive, you can say N to all other CD-ROM options, but be sure
773 to say Y or M to "ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system support".
775 Note that older versions of LILO (LInux LOader) cannot properly deal
776 with IDE/ATAPI CD-ROMs, so install LILO 16 or higher, available from
777 <ftp://brun.dyndns.org/pub/linux/lilo/>.
779 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
780 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
781 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
782 will be called ide-cd.o.
784 Include IDE/ATAPI TAPE support
785 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDETAPE
786 If you have an IDE tape drive using the ATAPI protocol, say Y.
787 ATAPI is a newer protocol used by IDE tape and CD-ROM drives,
788 similar to the SCSI protocol. If you have an SCSI tape drive
789 however, you can say N here.
791 You should also say Y if you have an OnStream DI-30 tape drive; this
792 will not work with the SCSI protocol, until there is support for the
793 SC-30 and SC-50 versions.
795 If you say Y here, the tape drive will be identified at boot time
796 along with other IDE devices, as "hdb" or "hdc", or something
797 similar, and will be mapped to a character device such as "ht0"
798 (check the boot messages with dmesg). Be sure to consult the
799 <file:drivers/ide/ide-tape.c> and <file:Documentation/ide.txt> files
800 for usage information.
802 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
803 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
804 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
805 will be called ide-tape.o.
807 Include IDE/ATAPI FLOPPY support
808 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEFLOPPY
809 If you have an IDE floppy drive which uses the ATAPI protocol,
810 answer Y. ATAPI is a newer protocol used by IDE CD-ROM/tape/floppy
811 drives, similar to the SCSI protocol.
813 The LS-120 and the IDE/ATAPI Iomega ZIP drive are also supported by
814 this driver. For information about jumper settings and the question
815 of when a ZIP drive uses a partition table, see
816 <http://www.win.tue.nl/~aeb/linux/zip/zip-1.html>.
817 (ATAPI PD-CD/CDR drives are not supported by this driver; support
818 for PD-CD/CDR drives is available if you answer Y to
819 "SCSI emulation support", below).
821 If you say Y here, the FLOPPY drive will be identified along with
822 other IDE devices, as "hdb" or "hdc", or something similar (check
823 the boot messages with dmesg).
825 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
826 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
827 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
828 will be called ide-floppy.o.
830 AWARD Bios Work-Around
831 CONFIG_IDEDISK_STROKE
832 Should you have a system w/ an AWARD Bios and your drives are larger
833 than 32GB and it will not boot, one is required to perform a few OEM
834 operations first. The option is called "STROKE" because it allows
835 one to "soft clip" the drive to work around a barrier limit. For
836 Maxtor drives it is called "jumpon.exe". Please search Maxtor's
837 web-site for "JUMPON.EXE". IBM has a similar tool at:
838 <http://www.storage.ibm.com/hdd/support/download.htm>.
840 If you are unsure, say N here.
842 Raw Access to Media
843 CONFIG_IDE_TASK_IOCTL
844 This is a direct raw access to the media. It is a complex but
845 elegant solution to test and validate the domain of the hardware and
846 perform below the driver data recover if needed. This is the most
847 basic form of media-forensics.
849 If you are unsure, say N here.
851 Use Taskfile I/O
852 CONFIG_IDE_TASKFILE_IO
853 This is the "Jewel" of the patch. It will go away and become the new
854 driver core. Since all the chipsets/host side hardware deal w/ their
855 exceptions in "their local code" currently, adoption of a
856 standardized data-transport is the only logical solution.
857 Additionally we packetize the requests and gain rapid performance and
858 a reduction in system latency. Additionally by using a memory struct
859 for the commands we can redirect to a MMIO host hardware in the next
860 generation of controllers, specifically second generation Ultra133
861 and Serial ATA.
863 Since this is a major transition, it was deemed necessary to make the
864 driver paths buildable in separate models. Therefore if using this
865 option fails for your arch then we need to address the needs for that
866 arch.
868 If you want to test this functionality, say Y here.
870 Force DMA
871 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_FORCED
872 This is an old piece of lost code from Linux 2.0 Kernels.
874 Generally say N here.
876 DMA Only on Disks
877 CONFIG_IDEDMA_ONLYDISK
878 This is used if you know your ATAPI Devices are going to fail DMA
879 Transfers.
881 Generally say N here.
883 SCSI emulation support
884 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDESCSI
885 This will provide SCSI host adapter emulation for IDE ATAPI devices,
886 and will allow you to use a SCSI device driver instead of a native
887 ATAPI driver.
889 This is useful if you have an ATAPI device for which no native
890 driver has been written (for example, an ATAPI PD-CD or CDR drive);
891 you can then use this emulation together with an appropriate SCSI
892 device driver. In order to do this, say Y here and to "SCSI support"
893 and "SCSI generic support", below. You must then provide the kernel
894 command line "hdx=scsi" (try "man bootparam" or see the
895 documentation of your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to
896 pass options to the kernel at boot time) for devices if you want the
897 native EIDE sub-drivers to skip over the native support, so that
898 this SCSI emulation can be used instead. This is required for use of
899 CD-RW's.
901 Note that this option does NOT allow you to attach SCSI devices to a
902 box that doesn't have a SCSI host adapter installed.
904 If both this SCSI emulation and native ATAPI support are compiled
905 into the kernel, the native support will be used.
907 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
908 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
909 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
910 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
911 ide-scsi.o
913 Use the NOOP Elevator (WARNING)
914 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ELEVATOR_NOOP
915 If you are using a raid class top-level driver above the ATA/IDE core,
916 one may find a performance boost by preventing a merging and re-sorting
917 of the new requests.
919 If unsure, say N.
921 ISA-PNP EIDE support
922 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ISAPNP
923 If you have an ISA EIDE card that is PnP (Plug and Play) and
924 requires setup first before scanning for devices, say Y here.
926 If unsure, say N.
928 CMD640 chipset bugfix/support
929 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CMD640
930 The CMD-Technologies CMD640 IDE chip is used on many common 486 and
931 Pentium motherboards, usually in combination with a "Neptune" or
932 "SiS" chipset. Unfortunately, it has a number of rather nasty
933 design flaws that can cause severe data corruption under many common
934 conditions. Say Y here to include code which tries to automatically
935 detect and correct the problems under Linux. This option also
936 enables access to the secondary IDE ports in some CMD640 based
937 systems.
939 This driver will work automatically in PCI based systems (most new
940 systems have PCI slots). But if your system uses VESA local bus
941 (VLB) instead of PCI, you must also supply a kernel boot parameter
942 to enable the CMD640 bugfix/support: "ide0=cmd640_vlb". (Try "man
943 bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader about how to
944 pass options to the kernel.)
946 The CMD640 chip is also used on add-in cards by Acculogic, and on
947 the "CSA-6400E PCI to IDE controller" that some people have. For
948 details, read <file:Documentation/ide.txt>.
950 CMD640 enhanced support
951 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CMD640_ENHANCED
952 This option includes support for setting/autotuning PIO modes and
953 prefetch on CMD640 IDE interfaces. For details, read
954 <file:Documentation/ide.txt>. If you have a CMD640 IDE interface
955 and your BIOS does not already do this for you, then say Y here.
956 Otherwise say N.
958 RZ1000 chipset bugfix/support
959 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RZ1000
960 The PC-Technologies RZ1000 IDE chip is used on many common 486 and
961 Pentium motherboards, usually along with the "Neptune" chipset.
962 Unfortunately, it has a rather nasty design flaw that can cause
963 severe data corruption under many conditions. Say Y here to include
964 code which automatically detects and corrects the problem under
965 Linux. This may slow disk throughput by a few percent, but at least
966 things will operate 100% reliably.
968 Generic PCI IDE chipset support
969 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEPCI
970 Say Y here for PCI systems which use IDE drive(s).
971 This option helps the IDE driver to automatically detect and
972 configure all PCI-based IDE interfaces in your system.
974 Support for sharing PCI IDE interrupts
975 CONFIG_IDEPCI_SHARE_IRQ
976 Some ATA/IDE chipsets have hardware support which allows for
977 sharing a single IRQ with other cards. To enable support for
978 this in the ATA/IDE driver, say Y here.
980 It is safe to say Y to this question, in most cases.
981 If unsure, say N.
983 Generic PCI bus-master DMA support
984 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_PCI
985 If your PCI system uses IDE drive(s) (as opposed to SCSI, say) and
986 is capable of bus-master DMA operation (most Pentium PCI systems),
987 you will want to say Y here to reduce CPU overhead. You can then use
988 the "hdparm" utility to enable DMA for drives for which it was not
989 enabled automatically. By default, DMA is not enabled automatically
990 for these drives, but you can change that by saying Y to the
991 following question "Use DMA by default when available". You can get
992 the latest version of the hdparm utility from
993 <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/hardware/>.
995 Read the comments at the beginning of <file:drivers/ide/ide-dma.c>
996 and the file <file:Documentation/ide.txt> for more information.
998 It is safe to say Y to this question.
1000 Good-Bad DMA Model-Firmware (WIP)
1001 CONFIG_IDEDMA_NEW_DRIVE_LISTINGS
1002 If you say Y here, the model and firmware revision of your drive
1003 will be compared against a blacklist of buggy drives that claim to
1004 be (U)DMA capable but aren't. This is a blanket on/off test with no
1005 speed limit options.
1007 Straight GNU GCC 2.7.3/2.8.X compilers are known to be safe;
1008 whereas, many versions of EGCS have a problem and miscompile if you
1009 say Y here.
1011 If in doubt, say N.
1013 Attempt to HACK around Chipsets that TIMEOUT (WIP)
1014 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_TIMEOUT
1015 If you say Y here, this is a NASTY UGLY HACK!
1017 We have to issue an abort and requeue the request DMA engine got
1018 turned off by a goofy ASIC, and we have to clean up the mess, and
1019 here is as good as any. Do it globally for all chipsets.
1021 If in doubt, say N.
1023 Boot off-board chipsets first support
1024 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_OFFBOARD
1025 Normally, IDE controllers built into the motherboard (on-board
1026 controllers) are assigned to ide0 and ide1 while those on add-in PCI
1027 cards (off-board controllers) are relegated to ide2 and ide3.
1028 Answering Y here will allow you to reverse the situation, with
1029 off-board controllers on ide0/1 and on-board controllers on ide2/3.
1030 This can improve the usability of some boot managers such as lilo
1031 when booting from a drive on an off-board controller.
1033 If you say Y here, and you actually want to reverse the device scan
1034 order as explained above, you also need to issue the kernel command
1035 line option "ide=reverse". (Try "man bootparam" or see the
1036 documentation of your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to
1037 pass options to the kernel at boot time.)
1039 Note that, if you do this, the order of the hd* devices will be
1040 rearranged which may require modification of fstab and other files.
1042 If in doubt, say N.
1044 Use PCI DMA by default when available
1045 CONFIG_IDEDMA_PCI_AUTO
1046 Prior to kernel version 2.1.112, Linux used to automatically use
1047 DMA for IDE drives and chipsets which support it. Due to concerns
1048 about a couple of cases where buggy hardware may have caused damage,
1049 the default is now to NOT use DMA automatically. To revert to the
1050 previous behaviour, say Y to this question.
1052 If you suspect your hardware is at all flakey, say N here.
1053 Do NOT email the IDE kernel people regarding this issue!
1055 It is normally safe to answer Y to this question unless your
1056 motherboard uses a VIA VP2 chipset, in which case you should say N.
1058 IGNORE word93 Validation BITS
1059 CONFIG_IDEDMA_IVB
1060 There are unclear terms in ATA-4 and ATA-5 standards how certain
1061 hardware (an 80c ribbon) should be detected. Different interpretations
1062 of the standards have been released in hardware. This causes problems:
1063 for example, a host with Ultra Mode 4 (or higher) will not run
1064 in that mode with an 80c ribbon.
1066 If you are experiencing compatibility or performance problems, you
1067 MAY try to answering Y here. However, it does not necessarily solve
1068 any of your problems, it could even cause more of them.
1070 It is normally safe to answer Y; however, the default is N.
1072 ATA Work(s) In Progress (EXPERIMENTAL)
1073 CONFIG_IDEDMA_PCI_WIP
1074 If you enable this you will be able to use and test highly
1075 developmental projects. If you say N, the configurator will
1076 simply skip those options.
1078 It is SAFEST to say N to this question.
1080 Asynchronous DMA support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1081 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ADMA
1082 Please read the comments at the top of
1083 <file:drivers/ide/ide-adma.c>.
1085 Pacific Digital A-DMA support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1086 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC_ADMA
1087 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/setup-pci.c>.
1089 3ware Hardware ATA-RAID support
1090 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_3W_XXXX_RAID
1091 3ware is the only hardware ATA-Raid product in Linux to date.
1092 This card is 2,4, or 8 channel master mode support only.
1093 SCSI support required!!!
1095 <http://www.3ware.com/>
1097 Please read the comments at the top of
1098 <file:drivers/scsi/3w-xxxx.c>.
1100 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
1101 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
1102 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
1103 will be called 3w-xxxx.o.
1105 AEC62XX chipset support
1106 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_AEC62XX
1107 This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
1108 interrupt. This add-on card is a bootable PCI UDMA controller. In
1109 order to get this card to initialize correctly in some cases, you
1110 should say Y here, and preferably also to "Use DMA by default when
1111 available".
1113 The ATP850U/UF is an UltraDMA 33 chipset base.
1114 The ATP860 is an UltraDMA 66 chipset base.
1115 The ATP860M(acintosh) version is an UltraDMA 66 chipset base.
1117 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/aec62xx.c>.
1118 If you say Y here, then say Y to "Use DMA by default when available"
1119 as well.
1121 AEC62XX Tuning support
1122 CONFIG_AEC62XX_TUNING
1123 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/aec62xx.c>.
1124 If unsure, say N.
1126 ALI M15x3 chipset support
1127 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ALI15X3
1128 This driver ensures (U)DMA support for ALI 1533, 1543 and 1543C
1129 onboard chipsets. It also tests for Simplex mode and enables
1130 normal dual channel support.
1132 If you say Y here, you also need to say Y to "Use DMA by default
1133 when available", above. Please read the comments at the top of
1134 <file:drivers/ide/pci/alim15x3.c>.
1136 If unsure, say N.
1138 ALI M15x3 WDC support (DANGEROUS)
1139 CONFIG_WDC_ALI15X3
1140 This allows for UltraDMA support for WDC drives that ignore CRC
1141 checking. You are a fool for enabling this option, but there have
1142 been requests. DO NOT COMPLAIN IF YOUR DRIVE HAS FS CORRUPTION, IF
1143 YOU ENABLE THIS! No one will listen, just laugh for ignoring this
1144 SERIOUS WARNING.
1146 Using this option can allow WDC drives to run at ATA-4/5 transfer
1147 rates with only an ATA-2 support structure.
1149 SAY N!
1151 AMD and nVidia IDE support
1152 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_AMD74XX
1153 This driver adds explicit support for AMD-7xx and AMD-8111 chips
1154 and also for the nVidia nForce chip. This allows the kernel to
1155 change PIO, DMA and UDMA speeds and to configure the chip to
1156 optimum performance.
1158 If you say Y here, you also need to say Y to "Use DMA by default
1159 when available", above.
1160 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/amd74xx.c>.
1162 If unsure, say N.
1164 AMD Viper ATA-66 Override support (WIP)
1165 CONFIG_AMD74XX_OVERRIDE
1166 This option auto-forces the ata66 flag.
1167 This effect can be also invoked by calling "idex=ata66"
1168 If unsure, say N.
1170 ATI IXP chipset IDE support
1171 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATIIXP
1172 This driver adds explicit support for ATI IXP chipset.
1173 This allows the kernel to change PIO, DMA and UDMA speeds
1174 and to configure the chip to optimum performance.
1176 Say Y here if you have an ATI IXP chipset IDE controller.
1178 CMD64X/CMD680 chipset support
1179 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CMD64X
1180 Say Y here if you have an IDE controller which uses any of these
1181 chipsets: CMD643, CMD646 and CMD648.
1183 Compaq Triflex IDE support
1184 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_TRIFLEX
1185 Say Y here if you have a Compaq Triflex IDE controller, such
1186 as those commonly found on Compaq Pentium-Pro systems
1188 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
1189 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
1190 triflex.o.
1192 CY82C693 chipset support
1193 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CY82C693
1194 This driver adds detection and support for the CY82C693 chipset
1195 used on Digital's PC-Alpha 164SX boards.
1197 If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default
1198 when available" as well.
1200 Cyrix CS5530 MediaGX chipset support
1201 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CS5530
1202 Include support for UDMA on the Cyrix MediaGX 5530 chipset. This
1203 will automatically be detected and configured if found.
1205 It is safe to say Y to this question.
1207 People with SCSI-only systems should say N here. If unsure, say Y.
1209 HPT34X chipset support
1210 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HPT34X
1211 This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
1212 interrupt. The HPT343 chipset in its current form is a non-bootable
1213 controller; the HPT345/HPT363 chipset is a bootable (needs BIOS FIX)
1214 PCI UDMA controllers. This driver requires dynamic tuning of the
1215 chipset during the ide-probe at boot time. It is reported to support
1216 DVD II drives, by the manufacturer.
1218 HPT34X AUTODMA support (WIP)
1219 CONFIG_HPT34X_AUTODMA
1220 This is a dangerous thing to attempt currently! Please read the
1221 comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/hpt34x.c>. If you say Y
1222 here, then say Y to "Use DMA by default when available" as well.
1224 If unsure, say N.
1226 HPT36X/37X chipset support
1227 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HPT366
1228 HPT366 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-66.
1229 HPT368 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-66 RAID Based.
1230 HPT370 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-100.
1231 HPT372 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-133.
1232 HPT374 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-133.
1234 This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
1235 interrupt.
1237 The HPT366 chipset in its current form is bootable. One solution
1238 for this problem are special LILO commands for redirecting the
1239 reference to device 0x80. The other solution is to say Y to "Boot
1240 off-board chipsets first support" (CONFIG_BLK_DEV_OFFBOARD) unless
1241 your mother board has the chipset natively mounted. Regardless one
1242 should use the fore mentioned option and call at LILO or include
1243 "ide=reverse" in LILO's append-line.
1245 This driver requires dynamic tuning of the chipset during the
1246 ide-probe at boot. It is reported to support DVD II drives, by the
1247 manufacturer.
1249 NS87415 chipset support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1250 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_NS87415
1251 This driver adds detection and support for the NS87415 chip
1252 (used in SPARC64, among others).
1254 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/ns87415.c>.
1256 OPTi 82C621 chipset enhanced support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1257 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_OPTI621
1258 This is a driver for the OPTi 82C621 EIDE controller.
1259 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/opti621.c>.
1261 National SCx200 chipset support
1262 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SC1200
1263 This driver adds support for the built in IDE on the National
1264 SCx200 series of embedded x86 "Geode" systems
1266 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
1267 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
1268 sc1200.o.
1270 ServerWorks OSB4/CSB5 chipset support
1271 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SVWKS
1272 This driver adds PIO/(U)DMA support for the ServerWorks OSB4/CSB5
1273 chipsets.
1275 SGI IOC4 chipset support
1276 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SGIIOC4
1277 This driver adds PIO & MultiMode DMA-2 support for the SGI IOC4
1278 chipset. Please say Y here, if you have an Altix System from
1279 Silicon Graphics Inc.
1281 Intel PIIXn chipsets support
1282 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PIIX
1283 This driver adds PIO mode setting and tuning for all PIIX IDE
1284 controllers by Intel. Since the BIOS can sometimes improperly tune
1285 PIO 0-4 mode settings, this allows dynamic tuning of the chipset
1286 via the standard end-user tool 'hdparm'.
1288 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/piix.c>.
1290 If you say Y here, you should also say Y to "PIIXn Tuning support",
1291 below.
1293 If unsure, say N.
1295 PIIXn Tuning support
1296 CONFIG_PIIX_TUNING
1297 This driver extension adds DMA mode setting and tuning for all PIIX
1298 IDE controllers by Intel. Since the BIOS can sometimes improperly
1299 set up the device/adapter combination and speed limits, it has
1300 become a necessity to back/forward speed devices as needed.
1302 Case 430HX/440FX PIIX3 need speed limits to reduce UDMA to DMA mode
1303 2 if the BIOS can not perform this task at initialization.
1305 If unsure, say N.
1307 PROMISE PDC20246/PDC20262/PDC20265/PDC20267/PDC20268 support
1308 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC202XX_OLD
1309 Promise Ultra33 or PDC20246
1310 Promise Ultra66 or PDC20262
1311 Promise Ultra100 or PDC20265/PDC20267/PDC20268
1313 This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
1314 interrupt. This add-on card is a bootable PCI UDMA controller. Since
1315 multiple cards can be installed and there are BIOS ROM problems that
1316 happen if the BIOS revisions of all installed cards (three-max) do
1317 not match, the driver attempts to do dynamic tuning of the chipset
1318 at boot-time for max-speed. Ultra33 BIOS 1.25 or newer is required
1319 for more than one card. This card may require that you say Y to
1320 "Special UDMA Feature".
1322 If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
1323 available" as well.
1325 Please read the comments at the top of
1326 <file:drivers/ide/pci/pdc202xx_old.c>.
1328 If unsure, say N.
1330 PROMISE PDC202{68|69|70|71|75|76|77} support
1331 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC202XX_NEW
1332 Promise Ultra 100 TX2 [PDC20268]
1333 Promise Ultra 133 PTX2 [PDC20269]
1334 Promise FastTrak LP/TX2/TX4 [PDC20270]
1335 Promise FastTrak TX2000 [PDC20271]
1336 Promise MB Ultra 133 [PDC20275]
1337 Promise MB FastTrak 133 [PDC20276]
1338 Promise FastTrak 133 [PDC20277]
1340 This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
1341 interrupt. This device is a bootable PCI UDMA controller. Since
1342 multiple cards can be installed and there are BIOS ROM problems that
1343 happen if the BIOS revisions of all installed cards (max of five) do
1344 not match, the driver attempts to do dynamic tuning of the chipset
1345 at boot-time for max speed. Ultra33 BIOS 1.25 or newer is required
1346 for more than one card.
1348 If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
1349 available" as well.
1351 If unsure, say N.
1353 Special UDMA Feature
1354 CONFIG_PDC202XX_BURST
1355 This option causes the pdc202xx driver to enable UDMA modes on the
1356 PDC202xx even when the PDC202xx BIOS has not done so.
1358 It was originally designed for the PDC20246/Ultra33, whose BIOS will
1359 only setup UDMA on the first two PDC20246 cards. It has also been
1360 used successfully on a PDC20265/Ultra100, allowing use of UDMA modes
1361 when the PDC20265 BIOS has been disabled (for faster boot up).
1363 Please read the comments at the top of
1364 <file:drivers/ide/pci/pdc202xx_old.c>.
1366 If unsure, say N.
1368 Special FastTrak Feature
1369 CONFIG_PDC202XX_FORCE
1370 For FastTrak enable overriding BIOS.
1372 SiS5513 chipset support
1373 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SIS5513
1374 This driver ensures (U)DMA support for SIS5513 chipset family based
1375 mainboards.
1377 The following chipsets are supported:
1378 ATA16: SiS5511, SiS5513
1379 ATA33: SiS5591, SiS5597, SiS5598, SiS5600
1380 ATA66: SiS530, SiS540, SiS620, SiS630, SiS640
1381 ATA100: SiS635, SiS645, SiS650, SiS730, SiS735, SiS740,
1382 SiS745, SiS750
1384 If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
1385 available" as well.
1387 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/sis5513.c>.
1389 Silicon Image chipset support
1390 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SIIMAGE
1391 This driver provides (U)DMA support for the SII3112 SATA controllers and
1392 for the CMD/SI680 UDMA/DMA ATA controller.
1394 SLC90E66 chipset support
1395 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SLC90E66
1396 This driver ensures (U)DMA support for Victroy66 SouthBridges for
1397 SMsC with Intel NorthBridges. This is an Ultra66 based chipset.
1398 The nice thing about it is that you can mix Ultra/DMA/PIO devices
1399 and it will handle timing cycles. Since this is an improved
1400 look-a-like to the PIIX4 it should be a nice addition.
1402 If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
1403 available" as well.
1405 Please read the comments at the top of
1406 <file:drivers/ide/pci/slc90e66.c>.
1408 Winbond SL82c105 support
1409 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SL82C105
1410 If you have a Winbond SL82c105 IDE controller, say Y here to enable
1411 special configuration for this chip. This is common on various CHRP
1412 motherboards, but could be used elsewhere. If in doubt, say Y.
1414 Tekram TRM290 chipset support
1415 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_TRM290
1416 This driver adds support for bus master DMA transfers
1417 using the Tekram TRM290 PCI IDE chip. Volunteers are
1418 needed for further tweaking and development.
1419 Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/trm290.c>.
1421 VIA82CXXX chipset support
1422 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_VIA82CXXX
1423 This allows you to configure your chipset for a better use while
1424 running PIO/(U)DMA, it will allow you to enable efficiently the
1425 second channel dma usage, as it may not be set by BIOS. It will try
1426 to set fifo configuration at its best. It will allow you to get
1427 information from /proc/ide/via provided you enabled "/proc file
1428 system" support.
1430 Please read the comments at the top of
1431 <file:drivers/ide/pci/via82cxxx.c>.
1433 If you say Y here, then say Y to "Use DMA by default when available"
1434 as well.
1436 If unsure, say N.
1438 RapIDE interface support
1439 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_RAPIDE
1440 Say Y here if you want to support the Yellowstone RapIDE controller
1441 manufactured for use with Acorn computers.
1443 Other IDE chipset support
1444 CONFIG_IDE_CHIPSETS
1445 Say Y here if you want to include enhanced support for various IDE
1446 interface chipsets used on motherboards and add-on cards. You can
1447 then pick your particular IDE chip from among the following options.
1448 This enhanced support may be necessary for Linux to be able to
1449 access the 3rd/4th drives in some systems. It may also enable
1450 setting of higher speed I/O rates to improve system performance with
1451 these chipsets. Most of these also require special kernel boot
1452 parameters to actually turn on the support at runtime; you can find
1453 a list of these in the file <file:Documentation/ide.txt>.
1455 People with SCSI-only systems can say N here.
1457 Generic 4 drives/port support
1458 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_4DRIVES
1459 Certain older chipsets, including the Tekram 690CD, use a single set
1460 of I/O ports at 0x1f0 to control up to four drives, instead of the
1461 customary two drives per port. Support for this can be enabled at
1462 runtime using the "ide0=four" kernel boot parameter if you say Y
1463 here.
1465 ALI M14xx support
1466 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ALI14XX
1467 This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=ali14xx" kernel
1468 boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
1469 of the ALI M1439/1443/1445/1487/1489 chipsets, and permits faster
1470 I/O speeds to be set as well. See the files
1471 <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and <file:drivers/ide/legacy/ali14xx.c> for
1472 more info.
1474 DTC-2278 support
1475 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_DTC2278
1476 This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=dtc2278" kernel
1477 boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
1478 of the DTC-2278 card, and permits faster I/O speeds to be set as
1479 well. See the <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and
1480 <file:drivers/ide/legacy/dtc2278.c> files for more info.
1482 Holtek HT6560B support
1483 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HT6560B
1484 This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=ht6560b" kernel
1485 boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
1486 of the Holtek card, and permits faster I/O speeds to be set as well.
1487 See the <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and
1488 <file:drivers/ide/legacy/ht6560b.c> files for more info.
1490 PROMISE DC4030 support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1491 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC4030
1492 This driver provides support for the secondary IDE interface and
1493 cache of Promise IDE chipsets, e.g. DC4030 and DC5030. This driver
1494 is known to incur timeouts/retries during heavy I/O to drives
1495 attached to the secondary interface. CD-ROM and TAPE devices are
1496 not supported yet. This driver is enabled at runtime using the
1497 "ide0=dc4030" kernel boot parameter. See the
1498 <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and <file:drivers/ide/legacy/pdc4030.c> files
1499 for more info.
1501 QDI QD65XX support
1502 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_QD65XX
1503 This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=qd65xx" kernel
1504 boot parameter. It permits faster I/O speeds to be set. See the
1505 <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and <file:drivers/ide/legacy/qd65xx.c> for
1506 more info.
1508 UMC 8672 support
1509 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_UMC8672
1510 This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=umc8672" kernel
1511 boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
1512 of the UMC-8672, and permits faster I/O speeds to be set as well.
1513 See the files <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and
1514 <file:drivers/ide/legacy/umc8672.c> for more info.
1516 Amiga Gayle IDE interface support
1517 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_GAYLE
1518 This is the IDE driver for the Amiga Gayle IDE interface. It supports
1519 both the `A1200 style' and `A4000 style' of the Gayle IDE interface,
1520 This includes builtin IDE interfaces on some Amiga models (A600,
1521 A1200, A4000, and A4000T), and IDE interfaces on the Zorro expansion
1522 bus (M-Tech E-Matrix 530 expansion card).
1523 Say Y if you have an Amiga with a Gayle IDE interface and want to use
1524 IDE devices (hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected to it.
1525 Note that you also have to enable Zorro bus support if you want to
1526 use Gayle IDE interfaces on the Zorro expansion bus.
1528 Falcon IDE interface support
1529 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_FALCON_IDE
1530 This is the IDE driver for the builtin IDE interface on the Atari
1531 Falcon. Say Y if you have a Falcon and want to use IDE devices (hard
1532 disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected to the builtin IDE
1533 interface.
1535 Amiga Buddha/Catweasel/X-Surf IDE interface support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1536 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_BUDDHA
1537 This is the IDE driver for the IDE interfaces on the Buddha,
1538 Catweasel and X-Surf expansion boards. It supports up to two interfaces
1539 on the Buddha, three on the Catweasel and two on the X-Surf.
1541 Say Y if you have a Buddha or Catweasel expansion board and want to
1542 use IDE devices (hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected
1543 to one of its IDE interfaces.
1545 Amiga IDE Doubler support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1546 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDOUBLER
1547 This driver provides support for the so-called `IDE doublers' (made
1548 by various manufacturers, e.g. Eyetech) that can be connected to the
1549 builtin IDE interface of some Amiga models. Using such an IDE
1550 doubler, you can connect up to four instead of two IDE devices on
1551 the Amiga's builtin IDE interface.
1553 Note that the normal Amiga Gayle IDE driver may not work correctly
1554 if you have an IDE doubler and don't enable this driver!
1556 Say Y if you have an IDE doubler. The driver is enabled at kernel
1557 runtime using the "ide=doubler" kernel boot parameter.
1559 Builtin PowerMac IDE support
1560 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_PMAC
1561 This driver provides support for the built-in IDE controller on
1562 most of the recent Apple Power Macintoshes and PowerBooks.
1563 If unsure, say Y.
1565 PowerMac IDE DMA support
1566 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_PMAC
1567 This option allows the driver for the built-in IDE controller on
1568 Power Macintoshes and PowerBooks to use DMA (direct memory access)
1569 to transfer data to and from memory. Saying Y is safe and improves
1570 performance.
1572 Broadcom SiByte onboard IDE support
1573 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_SIBYTE
1574 Include the driver for on-board IDE on the SiByte Generic Bus. Note
1575 that this limits the number of IDE devices to 4 (ide0...ide3).
1577 Use DMA by default
1578 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_PMAC_AUTO
1579 This option allows the driver for the built-in IDE controller on
1580 Power Macintoshes and PowerBooks to use DMA automatically, without
1581 it having to be explicitly enabled. This option is provided because
1582 of concerns about a couple of cases where using DMA on buggy PC
1583 hardware may have caused damage. Saying Y should be safe on all
1584 Apple machines.
1586 Macintosh Quadra/Powerbook IDE interface support
1587 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_MAC_IDE
1588 This is the IDE driver for the builtin IDE interface on some m68k
1589 Macintosh models. It supports both the `Quadra style' (used in
1590 Quadra/ Centris 630 and Performa 588 models) and `Powerbook style'
1591 (used in the Powerbook 150 and 190 models) IDE interface.
1593 Say Y if you have such an Macintosh model and want to use IDE
1594 devices (hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected to the
1595 builtin IDE interface.
1597 ICS IDE interface support
1598 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_ICSIDE
1599 On Acorn systems, say Y here if you wish to use the ICS IDE
1600 interface card. This is not required for ICS partition support.
1601 If you are unsure, say N to this.
1603 ICS DMA support
1604 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_ICS
1605 Say Y here if you want to add DMA (Direct Memory Access) support to
1606 the ICS IDE driver.
1608 Use ICS DMA by default
1609 CONFIG_IDEDMA_ICS_AUTO
1610 Prior to kernel version 2.1.112, Linux used to automatically use
1611 DMA for IDE drives and chipsets which support it. Due to concerns
1612 about a couple of cases where buggy hardware may have caused damage,
1613 the default is now to NOT use DMA automatically. To revert to the
1614 previous behaviour, say Y to this question.
1616 If you suspect your hardware is at all flakey, say N here.
1617 Do NOT email the IDE kernel people regarding this issue!
1619 XT hard disk support
1620 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_XD
1621 Very old 8 bit hard disk controllers used in the IBM XT computer
1622 will be supported if you say Y here.
1624 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
1625 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
1626 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
1627 will be called xd.o.
1629 It's pretty unlikely that you have one of these: say N.
1631 PS/2 ESDI hard disk support
1632 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PS2
1633 Say Y here if you have a PS/2 machine with a MCA bus and an ESDI
1634 hard disk.
1636 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
1637 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
1638 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
1639 will be called ps2esdi.o.
1641 Mylex DAC960/DAC1100 PCI RAID Controller support
1642 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_DAC960
1643 This driver adds support for the Mylex DAC960, AcceleRAID, and
1644 eXtremeRAID PCI RAID controllers. See the file
1645 <file:Documentation/README.DAC960> for further information about
1646 this driver.
1648 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
1649 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
1650 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
1651 will be called DAC960.o.
1653 Parallel port IDE device support
1654 CONFIG_PARIDE
1655 There are many external CD-ROM and disk devices that connect through
1656 your computer's parallel port. Most of them are actually IDE devices
1657 using a parallel port IDE adapter. This option enables the PARIDE
1658 subsystem which contains drivers for many of these external drives.
1659 Read <file:Documentation/paride.txt> for more information.
1661 If you have said Y to the "Parallel-port support" configuration
1662 option, you may share a single port between your printer and other
1663 parallel port devices. Answer Y to build PARIDE support into your
1664 kernel, or M if you would like to build it as a loadable module. If
1665 your parallel port support is in a loadable module, you must build
1666 PARIDE as a module. If you built PARIDE support into your kernel,
1667 you may still build the individual protocol modules and high-level
1668 drivers as loadable modules. If you build this support as a module,
1669 it will be called paride.o.
1671 To use the PARIDE support, you must say Y or M here and also to at
1672 least one high-level driver (e.g. "Parallel port IDE disks",
1673 "Parallel port ATAPI CD-ROMs", "Parallel port ATAPI disks" etc.) and
1674 to at least one protocol driver (e.g. "ATEN EH-100 protocol",
1675 "MicroSolutions backpack protocol", "DataStor Commuter protocol"
1676 etc.).
1678 Parallel port IDE disks
1679 CONFIG_PARIDE_PD
1680 This option enables the high-level driver for IDE-type disk devices
1681 connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
1682 support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
1683 parallel port IDE driver, otherwise you should answer M to build
1684 it as a loadable module. The module will be called pd.o. You
1685 must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in your
1686 system. Among the devices supported by this driver are the SyQuest
1687 EZ-135, EZ-230 and SparQ drives, the Avatar Shark and the backpack
1688 hard drives from MicroSolutions.
1690 Parallel port ATAPI CD-ROMs
1691 CONFIG_PARIDE_PCD
1692 This option enables the high-level driver for ATAPI CD-ROM devices
1693 connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
1694 support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
1695 parallel port ATAPI CD-ROM driver, otherwise you should answer M to
1696 build it as a loadable module. The module will be called pcd.o. You
1697 must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in your
1698 system. Among the devices supported by this driver are the
1699 MicroSolutions backpack CD-ROM drives and the Freecom Power CD. If
1700 you have such a CD-ROM drive, you should also say Y or M to "ISO
1701 9660 CD-ROM file system support" below, because that's the file
1702 system used on CD-ROMs.
1704 Parallel port ATAPI disks
1705 CONFIG_PARIDE_PF
1706 This option enables the high-level driver for ATAPI disk devices
1707 connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
1708 support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
1709 parallel port ATAPI disk driver, otherwise you should answer M
1710 to build it as a loadable module. The module will be called pf.o.
1711 You must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in
1712 your system. Among the devices supported by this driver are the
1713 MicroSolutions backpack PD/CD drive and the Imation Superdisk
1714 LS-120 drive.
1716 Parallel port ATAPI tapes
1717 CONFIG_PARIDE_PT
1718 This option enables the high-level driver for ATAPI tape devices
1719 connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
1720 support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
1721 parallel port ATAPI disk driver, otherwise you should answer M
1722 to build it as a loadable module. The module will be called pt.o.
1723 You must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in
1724 your system. Among the devices supported by this driver is the
1725 parallel port version of the HP 5GB drive.
1727 Parallel port generic ATAPI devices
1728 CONFIG_PARIDE_PG
1729 This option enables a special high-level driver for generic ATAPI
1730 devices connected through a parallel port. The driver allows user
1731 programs, such as cdrtools, to send ATAPI commands directly to a
1732 device.
1734 If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may
1735 answer Y here to build in the parallel port generic ATAPI driver,
1736 otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The
1737 module will be called pg.o.
1739 You must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in
1740 your system.
1742 This driver implements an API loosely related to the generic SCSI
1743 driver. See <file:include/linux/pg.h>. for details.
1745 You can obtain the most recent version of cdrtools from
1746 <ftp://ftp.fokus.gmd.de/pub/unix/cdrecord/>. Versions 1.6.1a3 and
1747 later fully support this driver.
1749 ATEN EH-100 protocol
1750 CONFIG_PARIDE_ATEN
1751 This option enables support for the ATEN EH-100 parallel port IDE
1752 protocol. This protocol is used in some inexpensive low performance
1753 parallel port kits made in Hong Kong. If you chose to build PARIDE
1754 support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
1755 protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a
1756 loadable module. The module will be called aten.o. You must also
1757 have a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to
1758 support.
1760 Micro Solutions BACKPACK Series 5 protocol
1761 CONFIG_PARIDE_BPCK
1762 This option enables support for the Micro Solutions BACKPACK
1763 parallel port Series 5 IDE protocol. (Most BACKPACK drives made
1764 before 1999 were Series 5) Series 5 drives will NOT always have the
1765 Series noted on the bottom of the drive. Series 6 drivers will.
1767 In other words, if your BACKPACK drive dosen't say "Series 6" on the
1768 bottom, enable this option.
1770 If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may
1771 answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you should
1772 answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
1773 called bpck.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
1774 of device that you want to support.
1776 Micro Solutions BACKPACK Series 6 protocol
1777 CONFIG_PARIDE_BPCK6
1778 This option enables support for the Micro Solutions BACKPACK
1779 parallel port Series 6 IDE protocol. (Most BACKPACK drives made
1780 after 1999 were Series 6) Series 6 drives will have the Series noted
1781 on the bottom of the drive. Series 5 drivers don't always have it
1782 noted.
1784 In other words, if your BACKPACK drive says "Series 6" on the
1785 bottom, enable this option.
1787 If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may
1788 answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you should
1789 answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
1790 called bpck6.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
1791 of device that you want to support.
1793 DataStor Commuter protocol
1794 CONFIG_PARIDE_COMM
1795 This option enables support for the Commuter parallel port IDE
1796 protocol from DataStor. If you chose to build PARIDE support
1797 into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol
1798 driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable
1799 module. The module will be called comm.o. You must also have
1800 a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to support.
1802 DataStor EP-2000 protocol
1803 CONFIG_PARIDE_DSTR
1804 This option enables support for the EP-2000 parallel port IDE
1805 protocol from DataStor. If you chose to build PARIDE support
1806 into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol
1807 driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable
1808 module. The module will be called dstr.o. You must also have
1809 a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to support.
1811 Shuttle EPAT/EPEZ protocol
1812 CONFIG_PARIDE_EPAT
1813 This option enables support for the EPAT parallel port IDE protocol.
1814 EPAT is a parallel port IDE adapter manufactured by Shuttle
1815 Technology and widely used in devices from major vendors such as
1816 Hewlett-Packard, SyQuest, Imation and Avatar. If you chose to build
1817 PARIDE support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in
1818 the protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a
1819 loadable module. The module will be called epat.o. You must also
1820 have a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to
1821 support.
1823 Shuttle EPAT c7/c8 extension
1824 CONFIG_PARIDE_EPATC8
1825 This option enables support for the newer Shuttle EP1284 (aka c7 and
1826 c8) chip. You need this if you are using any recent Imation SuperDisk
1827 (LS-120) drive.
1829 Shuttle EPIA protocol
1830 CONFIG_PARIDE_EPIA
1831 This option enables support for the (obsolete) EPIA parallel port
1832 IDE protocol from Shuttle Technology. This adapter can still be
1833 found in some no-name kits. If you chose to build PARIDE support
1834 into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol
1835 driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable
1836 module. The module will be called epia.o. You must also have a
1837 high-level driver for the type of device that you want to support.
1839 FIT TD-2000 protocol
1840 CONFIG_PARIDE_FIT2
1841 This option enables support for the TD-2000 parallel port IDE
1842 protocol from Fidelity International Technology. This is a simple
1843 (low speed) adapter that is used in some portable hard drives. If
1844 you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may answer Y
1845 here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M
1846 to build it as a loadable module. The module will be called fit2.o.
1847 You must also have a high-level driver for the type of device that
1848 you want to support.
1850 FIT TD-3000 protocol
1851 CONFIG_PARIDE_FIT3
1852 This option enables support for the TD-3000 parallel port IDE
1853 protocol from Fidelity International Technology. This protocol is
1854 used in newer models of their portable disk, CD-ROM and PD/CD
1855 devices. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
1856 may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
1857 should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
1858 called fit3.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
1859 of device that you want to support.
1861 Freecom IQ ASIC-2 protocol
1862 CONFIG_PARIDE_FRIQ
1863 This option enables support for version 2 of the Freecom IQ parallel
1864 port IDE adapter. This adapter is used by the Maxell Superdisk
1865 drive. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
1866 may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
1867 should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
1868 called friq.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
1869 of device that you want to support.
1871 FreeCom power protocol
1872 CONFIG_PARIDE_FRPW
1873 This option enables support for the Freecom power parallel port IDE
1874 protocol. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
1875 may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
1876 should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
1877 called frpw.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
1878 of device that you want to support.
1880 KingByte KBIC-951A/971A protocols
1881 CONFIG_PARIDE_KBIC
1882 This option enables support for the KBIC-951A and KBIC-971A parallel
1883 port IDE protocols from KingByte Information Corp. KingByte's
1884 adapters appear in many no-name portable disk and CD-ROM products,
1885 especially in Europe. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your
1886 kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver,
1887 otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The
1888 module will be called kbic.o. You must also have a high-level driver
1889 for the type of device that you want to support.
1891 KT PHd protocol
1892 CONFIG_PARIDE_KTTI
1893 This option enables support for the "PHd" parallel port IDE protocol
1894 from KT Technology. This is a simple (low speed) adapter that is
1895 used in some 2.5" portable hard drives. If you chose to build PARIDE
1896 support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
1897 protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a
1898 loadable module. The module will be called ktti.o. You must also
1899 have a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to
1900 support.
1902 OnSpec 90c20 protocol
1903 CONFIG_PARIDE_ON20
1904 This option enables support for the (obsolete) 90c20 parallel port
1905 IDE protocol from OnSpec (often marketed under the ValuStore brand
1906 name). If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
1907 may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
1908 should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will
1909 be called on20.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the
1910 type of device that you want to support.
1912 OnSpec 90c26 protocol
1913 CONFIG_PARIDE_ON26
1914 This option enables support for the 90c26 parallel port IDE protocol
1915 from OnSpec Electronics (often marketed under the ValuStore brand
1916 name). If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
1917 may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
1918 should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
1919 called on26.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
1920 of device that you want to support.
1922 Logical Volume Manager (LVM) support
1923 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_LVM
1924 This driver lets you combine several hard disks, hard disk
1925 partitions, multiple devices or even loop devices (for evaluation
1926 purposes) into a volume group. Imagine a volume group as a kind of
1927 virtual disk. Logical volumes, which can be thought of as virtual
1928 partitions, can be created in the volume group. You can resize
1929 volume groups and logical volumes after creation time, corresponding
1930 to new capacity needs. Logical volumes are accessed as block
1931 devices named /dev/VolumeGroupName/LogicalVolumeName.
1933 For details see <file:Documentation/LVM-HOWTO>. You will need
1934 supporting user space software; location is in
1935 <file:Documentation/Changes>.
1937 If you want to compile this support as a module ( = code which can
1938 be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
1939 want), say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The
1940 module will be called lvm-mod.o.
1942 Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM)
1943 CONFIG_MD
1944 Support multiple physical spindles through a single logical device.
1945 Required for RAID and logical volume management (LVM).
1947 Multiple devices driver support
1948 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_MD
1949 This driver lets you combine several hard disk partitions into one
1950 logical block device. This can be used to simply append one
1951 partition to another one or to combine several redundant hard disks
1952 into a RAID1/4/5 device so as to provide protection against hard
1953 disk failures. This is called "Software RAID" since the combining of
1954 the partitions is done by the kernel. "Hardware RAID" means that the
1955 combining is done by a dedicated controller; if you have such a
1956 controller, you do not need to say Y here.
1958 More information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
1959 Software RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
1960 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also learn
1961 where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
1963 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
1964 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
1965 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
1966 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
1967 md.o
1969 If unsure, say N.
1971 Linear (append) mode
1972 CONFIG_MD_LINEAR
1973 If you say Y here, then your multiple devices driver will be able to
1974 use the so-called linear mode, i.e. it will combine the hard disk
1975 partitions by simply appending one to the other.
1977 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
1978 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
1979 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
1980 will be called linear.o.
1982 If unsure, say Y.
1984 RAID-0 (striping) mode
1985 CONFIG_MD_RAID0
1986 If you say Y here, then your multiple devices driver will be able to
1987 use the so-called raid0 mode, i.e. it will combine the hard disk
1988 partitions into one logical device in such a fashion as to fill them
1989 up evenly, one chunk here and one chunk there. This will increase
1990 the throughput rate if the partitions reside on distinct disks.
1992 Information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
1993 Software-RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
1994 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also
1995 learn where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
1997 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
1998 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
1999 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
2000 will be called raid0.o.
2002 If unsure, say Y.
2004 RAID-1 (mirroring) mode
2005 CONFIG_MD_RAID1
2006 A RAID-1 set consists of several disk drives which are exact copies
2007 of each other. In the event of a mirror failure, the RAID driver
2008 will continue to use the operational mirrors in the set, providing
2009 an error free MD (multiple device) to the higher levels of the
2010 kernel. In a set with N drives, the available space is the capacity
2011 of a single drive, and the set protects against a failure of (N - 1)
2012 drives.
2014 Information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
2015 Software-RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
2016 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also
2017 learn where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
2019 If you want to use such a RAID-1 set, say Y. This code is also
2020 available as a module called raid1.o ( = code which can be inserted
2021 in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). If you
2022 want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2023 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2025 If unsure, say Y.
2027 RAID-4/RAID-5 mode
2028 CONFIG_MD_RAID5
2029 A RAID-5 set of N drives with a capacity of C MB per drive provides
2030 the capacity of C * (N - 1) MB, and protects against a failure
2031 of a single drive. For a given sector (row) number, (N - 1) drives
2032 contain data sectors, and one drive contains the parity protection.
2033 For a RAID-4 set, the parity blocks are present on a single drive,
2034 while a RAID-5 set distributes the parity across the drives in one
2035 of the available parity distribution methods.
2037 Information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
2038 Software-RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
2039 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also
2040 learn where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
2042 If you want to use such a RAID-4/RAID-5 set, say Y. This code is
2043 also available as a module called raid5.o ( = code which can be
2044 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
2045 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2046 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2048 If unsure, say Y.
2050 Multipath I/O support
2051 CONFIG_MD_MULTIPATH
2052 Multipath-IO is the ability of certain devices to address the same
2053 physical disk over multiple 'IO paths'. The code ensures that such
2054 paths can be defined and handled at runtime, and ensures that a
2055 transparent failover to the backup path(s) happens if a IO errors
2056 arrives on the primary path.
2058 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
2059 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
2060 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2061 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
2062 multipath.o
2064 If unsure, say N.
2066 Support for IDE Raid controllers
2067 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID
2068 Say Y or M if you have an IDE Raid controller and want linux
2069 to use its softwareraid feature. You must also select an
2070 appropriate for your board low-level driver below.
2072 Note, that Linux does not use the Raid implementation in BIOS, and
2073 the main purpose for this feature is to retain compatibility and
2074 data integrity with other OS-es, using the same disk array. Linux
2075 has its own Raid drivers, which you should use if you need better
2076 performance.
2078 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
2079 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
2080 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2081 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
2082 ataraid.o
2084 Support Promise software RAID (Fasttrak(tm))
2085 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_PDC
2086 Say Y or M if you have a Promise Fasttrak (tm) Raid controller
2087 and want linux to use the softwareraid feature of this card.
2088 This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y numbers) as device
2089 names.
2091 If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
2092 pdcraid.o.
2094 Highpoint 370 software RAID
2095 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_HPT
2096 Say Y or M if you have a Highpoint HPT 370 Raid controller
2097 and want linux to use the softwareraid feature of this card.
2098 This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y numbers) as device
2099 names.
2101 If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
2102 hptraid.o.
2104 CMD/Silicon Image Medley Software RAID
2105 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_MEDLEY
2106 Say Y or M if you have a Silicon Image 3112 SATA RAID controller,
2107 a CMD680 based controller, or another IDE RAID controller that uses
2108 CMD's Medley software RAID, and want Linux to use the software RAID
2109 feature of this card. This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y
2110 numbers) as device names.
2112 This driver currently only supports RAID0 (striped) mode, so if you
2113 are using RAID1 (mirroring) this will not work for you. In that
2114 case, you may want to try the Silicon Image Medley Software RAID
2115 driver (below).
2117 Support for mirroring is planned in the future.
2119 If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
2120 medley.o.
2122 Silicon Image Medley Software RAID (old driver)
2123 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_SII
2124 Say Y or M if you have a Silicon Image SATARaid controller
2125 and want Linux to use the softwareraid feature of this card.
2126 This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y numbers) as device
2127 names.
2129 This driver does not reliably detect all Medley RAID sets, and could
2130 be dangerous if you have a striped set with disks of different size.
2132 You should use the new Medley RAID driver (above), unless you use
2133 RAID1 (mirroring), which the new driver does not yet support.
2135 If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
2136 silraid.o.
2138 Support for Acer PICA 1 chipset
2139 CONFIG_ACER_PICA_61
2140 This is a machine with a R4400 133/150 MHz CPU. To compile a Linux
2141 kernel that runs on these, say Y here. For details about Linux on
2142 the MIPS architecture, check out the Linux/MIPS FAQ on the WWW at
2143 <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
2145 Support for Algorithmics P4032 (EXPERIMENTAL)
2146 CONFIG_ALGOR_P4032
2147 This is an evaluation board of the British company Algorithmics.
2148 The board uses the R4300 and a R5230 CPUs. For more information
2149 about this board see <http://www.algor.co.uk/>.
2151 SGI SN2 L1 serial port support
2152 CONFIG_SGI_L1_SERIAL
2153 If you have an SGI SN2 and you want to use the serial port connected
2154 to the system controller (you want this!), say Y. Otherwise, say N.
2156 SGI SN2 L1 serial console support
2157 CONFIG_SGI_L1_SERIAL_CONSOLE
2158 If you have an SGI SN2 and you would like to use the system
2159 controller serial port as your console (you want this!), say Y.
2160 Otherwise, say N.
2162 Support for BAGET MIPS series
2163 CONFIG_BAGET_MIPS
2164 This enables support for the Baget, a Russian embedded system. For
2165 more details about the Baget see the Linux/MIPS FAQ on
2166 <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
2168 Baget AMD LANCE support
2169 CONFIG_BAGETLANCE
2170 Say Y to enable kernel support for AMD Lance Ethernet cards on the
2171 MIPS-32-based Baget embedded system. This chipset is better known
2172 via the NE2100 cards.
2174 Support for DECstations
2175 CONFIG_DECSTATION
2176 This enables support for DEC's MIPS based workstations. For details
2177 see the Linux/MIPS FAQ on <http://www.linux-mips.org/> and the
2178 DECstation porting pages on <http://decstation.unix-ag.org/>.
2180 If you have one of the following DECstation Models you definitely
2181 want to choose R4xx0 for the CPU Type:
2183 DECstation 5000/50
2184 DECstation 5000/150
2185 DECstation 5000/260
2186 DECsystem 5900/260
2188 otherwise choose R3000.
2190 Support for Cobalt Micro Server
2191 CONFIG_COBALT_MICRO_SERVER
2192 Support for MIPS-based Cobalt boxes (they have been bought by Sun
2193 and are now the "Server Appliance Business Unit") including the 2700
2194 series -- versions 1 of the Qube and Raq. To compile a Linux kernel
2195 for this hardware, say Y here.
2197 Support for Cobalt 2800
2198 CONFIG_COBALT_28
2199 Support for the second generation of MIPS-based Cobalt boxes (they
2200 have been bought by Sun and are now the "Server Appliance Business
2201 Unit") including the 2800 series -- versions 2 of the Qube and Raq.
2202 To compile a Linux kernel for this hardware, say Y here.
2204 Support for the Momentum Computer Ocelot SBC
2205 CONFIG_MOMENCO_OCELOT
2206 The Ocelot is a MIPS-based Single Board Computer (SBC) made by
2207 Momentum Computer <http://www.momenco.com/>.
2209 Support for NEC DDB Vrc-5074
2210 CONFIG_DDB5074
2211 This enables support for the VR5000-based NEC DDB Vrc-5074
2212 evaluation board.
2214 Support for NEC DDB Vrc-5476
2215 CONFIG_DDB5476
2216 This enables support for the R5432-based NEC DDB Vrc-5476
2217 evaluation board.
2219 Features : kernel debugging, serial terminal, NFS root fs, on-board
2220 ether port (Need an additional patch at <http://linux.junsun.net/>),
2221 USB, AC97, PCI, PCI VGA card & framebuffer console, IDE controller,
2222 PS2 keyboard, PS2 mouse, etc.
2224 Support for NEC DDB Vrc-5477
2225 CONFIG_DDB5477
2226 This enables support for the R5432-based NEC DDB Vrc-5477
2227 evaluation board.
2229 Features : kernel debugging, serial terminal, NFS root fs, on-board
2230 ether port (Need an additional patch at <http://linux.junsun.net/>),
2231 USB, AC97, PCI, etc.
2233 Support for MIPS Atlas board
2234 CONFIG_MIPS_ATLAS
2235 This enables support for the QED R5231-based MIPS Atlas evaluation
2236 board.
2238 Support for MIPS Malta board
2239 CONFIG_MIPS_MALTA
2240 This enables support for the VR5000-based MIPS Malta evaluation
2241 board.
2243 # Choice: bcmboard
2244 Support for Broadcom SiByte boards
2245 CONFIG_SIBYTE_SWARM
2246 Enable support for boards based on the Broadcom SiByte family:
2248 BCM91250A-SWARM BCM1250 ATX size Eval Board (BCM91250A-SWARM)
2250 BCM91250E-Sentosa BCM1250 PCI card Eval Board (BCM91250E-Sentosa)
2252 BCM91125E-Rhone BCM1125 PCI card Eval Board (BCM91125E-Rhone)
2254 Other Non-Broadcom SiByte-based platform
2256 # Choice: bcmsoc
2257 Support for Broadcom BCM1xxx SOCs
2258 CONFIG_SIBYTE_SB1250
2260 BCM1250 Dual-CPU SB1 with PCI and HyperTransport.
2262 BCM1120 Uniprocessor SB1.
2264 BCM1125 Uniprocessor SB1 with PCI (and HyperTransport for 1125H).
2266 BCM1250 Stepping
2267 CONFIG_CPU_SB1_PASS_1
2268 Which pass of the SOC is supported (see the "system_revision"
2269 register in the User Manual for more discussion of revisions):
2271 Pass1 1250 "Pass 1"
2273 An 1250 "Pass 2"
2275 Bn 1250 "Pass 2.2"
2277 Cn 1250 "Pass 3"
2279 BCM112x Stepping
2280 CONFIG_CPU_SB1_PASS_2
2281 Which pass of the SOC is supported (see the "system_revision"
2282 register in the User Manual for more discussion of revisions):
2284 Hybrid 1250 "Pass 2"
2286 An 112x "Pass 1"
2288 Booting from CFE
2289 CONFIG_SIBYTE_CFE
2290 Make use of the CFE API for enumerating available memory,
2291 controlling secondary CPUs, and possibly console output.
2293 Use firmware console
2294 CONFIG_SIBYTE_CFE_CONSOLE
2295 Use the CFE API's console write routines during boot. Other console
2296 options (VT console, sb1250 duart console, etc.) should not be
2297 configured.
2299 Support for Bus Watcher statistics
2300 CONFIG_SIBYTE_BUS_WATCHER
2301 Handle and keep statistics on the bus error interrupts (COR_ECC,
2302 BAD_ECC, IO_BUS).
2304 Bus trace dump on bus error
2305 CONFIG_SIBYTE_BW_TRACE
2306 Run a continuous bus trace, dumping the raw data as soon as a ZBbus
2307 error is detected. Cannot work if ZBbus profiling is turned on, and
2308 also will interfere with JTAG-based trace buffer activity. Raw
2309 buffer data is dumped to console, and must be processed off-line.
2311 Corelis Debugger
2312 CONFIG_SB1XXX_CORELIS
2313 Select compile flags that produce code that can be processed by the
2314 Corelis mksym utility and UDB Emulator.
2316 DMA for page clear and copy
2317 CONFIG_SIBYTE_DMA_PAGEOPS
2318 Instead of using the CPU to zero and copy pages, use a Data Mover
2319 channel. These DMA channels are otherwise unused by the standard
2320 SiByte Linux port. Seems to give a small performance benefit.
2322 Support for Galileo Evaluation board or CoSine Orion
2323 CONFIG_ORION
2324 Say Y if configuring for the Galileo evaluation board
2325 or CoSine Orion. More information is available at
2326 <http://tochna.technion.ac.il/project/linux/html/linux.html>.
2328 Otherwise, say N.
2330 Support for Mips Magnum 4000
2331 CONFIG_MIPS_MAGNUM_4000
2332 This is a machine with a R4000 100 MHz CPU. To compile a Linux
2333 kernel that runs on these, say Y here. For details about Linux on
2334 the MIPS architecture, check out the Linux/MIPS FAQ on the WWW at
2335 <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
2337 Enable Qtronix 990P Keyboard Support
2338 CONFIG_QTRONIX_KEYBOARD
2339 Images of Qtronix keyboards are at
2340 <http://www.qtronix.com/keyboard.html>.
2342 Support for Olivetti M700
2343 CONFIG_OLIVETTI_M700
2344 This is a machine with a R4000 100 MHz CPU. To compile a Linux
2345 kernel that runs on these, say Y here. For details about Linux on
2346 the MIPS architecture, check out the Linux/MIPS FAQ on the WWW at
2347 <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
2349 Support for SNI RM200 PCI
2350 CONFIG_SNI_RM200_PCI
2351 The SNI RM200 PCI was a MIPS-based platform manufactured by Siemens
2352 Nixdorf Informationssysteme (SNI), parent company of Pyramid
2353 Technology and now in turn merged with Fujitsu. Say Y here to
2354 support this machine type.
2356 Support for SGI-IP22 (Indy/Indigo2)
2357 CONFIG_SGI_IP22
2358 This are the SGI Indy, Challenge S and Indigo2, as well as certain
2359 OEM variants like the Tandem CMN B006S. To compile a Linux kernel
2360 that runs on these, say Y here.
2362 Support for SGI IP27 (Origin200/2000)
2363 CONFIG_SGI_IP27
2364 This are the SGI Origin 200, Origin 2000 and Onyx 2 Graphics
2365 workstations. To compile a Linux kernel that runs on these, say Y
2366 here.
2368 IP27 N-Mode
2369 CONFIG_SGI_SN0_N_MODE
2370 The nodes of Origin 200, Origin 2000 and Onyx 2 systems can be
2371 configured in either N-Modes which allows for more nodes or M-Mode
2372 which allows for more memory. Your system is most probably
2373 running in M-Mode, so you should say N here.
2375 Lasi Ethernet
2376 CONFIG_LASI_82596
2377 Say Y here to support the on-board Intel 82596 ethernet controller
2378 built into Hewlett-Packard PA-RISC machines.
2380 MIPS JAZZ onboard SONIC Ethernet support
2381 CONFIG_MIPS_JAZZ_SONIC
2382 This is the driver for the onboard card of MIPS Magnum 4000,
2383 Acer PICA, Olivetti M700-10 and a few other identical OEM systems.
2385 MIPS JAZZ FAS216 SCSI support
2386 CONFIG_JAZZ_ESP
2387 This is the driver for the onboard SCSI host adapter of MIPS Magnum
2388 4000, Acer PICA, Olivetti M700-10 and a few other identical OEM
2389 systems.
2391 MIPS GT96100 Ethernet support
2392 CONFIG_MIPS_GT96100ETH
2393 Say Y here to support the Ethernet subsystem on your GT96100 card.
2395 Zalon SCSI support
2396 CONFIG_SCSI_ZALON
2397 The Zalon is an interface chip that sits between the PA-RISC
2398 processor and the NCR 53c720 SCSI controller on K-series PA-RISC
2399 boards (these are used, among other places, on some HP 780
2400 workstations). Say Y here to make sure it gets initialized
2401 correctly before the Linux kernel tries to talk to the controller.
2403 SGI PROM Console Support
2404 CONFIG_SGI_PROM_CONSOLE
2405 Say Y here to set up the boot console on serial port 0.
2407 DECstation serial support
2408 CONFIG_SERIAL_DEC
2409 This selects whether you want to be asked about drivers for
2410 DECstation serial ports.
2412 Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
2413 kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
2414 the questions about DECstation serial ports.
2416 If unsure, say Y.
2418 Support for console on a DECstation serial port
2419 CONFIG_SERIAL_DEC_CONSOLE
2420 If you say Y here, it will be possible to use a serial port as the
2421 system console (the system console is the device which receives all
2422 kernel messages and warnings and which allows logins in single user
2423 mode). Note that the firmware uses ttyS0 as the serial console on
2424 the Maxine and ttyS2 on the others.
2426 If unsure, say Y.
2428 DZ11 Serial Support
2429 CONFIG_DZ
2430 DZ11-family serial controllers for VAXstations, including the
2431 DC7085, M7814, and M7819.
2433 TURBOchannel support
2434 CONFIG_TC
2435 TurboChannel is a DEC (now Compaq) bus for Alpha and MIPS processors.
2436 Documentation on writing device drivers for TurboChannel is available at:
2437 <http://www.cs.arizona.edu/computer.help/policy/DIGITAL_unix/AA-PS3HD-TET1_html/TITLE.html>.
2439 # Choice: galileo_clock
2440 75
2441 CONFIG_SYSCLK_75
2442 Configure the kernel for clock speed of your Galileo board.
2443 The choices are 75MHz, 83.3MHz, and 100MHz.
2445 83.3
2446 CONFIG_SYSCLK_83
2447 Configure the Galileo kernel for a clock speed of 83.3 MHz.
2449 100
2450 CONFIG_SYSCLK_100
2451 Configure the Galileo kernel for a clock speed of 100 MHz.
2453 Z85C30 Serial Support
2454 CONFIG_ZS
2455 Documentation on the Zilog 85C350 serial communications controller
2456 is downloadable at <http://www.zilog.com/pdfs/serial/z85c30.pdf>.
2458 PCMCIA SCSI adapter support
2459 CONFIG_SCSI_PCMCIA
2460 Say Y here if you intend to attach a PCMCIA or CardBus card to your
2461 computer which acts as a SCSI host adapter. These are credit card
2462 size devices often used with laptops.
2464 Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
2465 kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
2466 the questions PCMCIA SCSI host adapters.
2468 Adaptec APA1480 CardBus support
2469 CONFIG_PCMCIA_APA1480
2470 Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of CardBus SCSI host
2471 adapter to your computer.
2473 This driver is also available as a module called apa1480_cb.o ( =
2474 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
2475 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
2476 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2478 NinjaSCSI-3 / NinjaSCSI-32Bi (16bit) PCMCIA support
2479 CONFIG_PCMCIA_NINJA_SCSI
2480 If you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host adapter to
2481 your computer, say Y here and read
2482 <file:Documentation/README.nsp_cs.eng>.
2484 This driver is also available as a module called nsp_cs.o ( =
2485 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
2486 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
2487 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2489 Adaptec AHA152X PCMCIA support
2490 CONFIG_PCMCIA_AHA152X
2491 Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host
2492 adapter to your computer.
2494 This driver is also available as a module called aha152x_cs.o ( =
2495 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
2496 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
2497 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2499 Qlogic PCMCIA support
2500 CONFIG_PCMCIA_QLOGIC
2501 Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host
2502 adapter to your computer.
2504 This driver is also available as a module called qlogic_cs.o ( =
2505 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
2506 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
2507 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2509 Future Domain PCMCIA support
2510 CONFIG_PCMCIA_FDOMAIN
2511 Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host
2512 adapter to your computer.
2514 This driver is also available as a module called fdomain_cs.o ( =
2515 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
2516 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
2517 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
2519 # Choice: mipstype
2520 CPU type
2521 CONFIG_CPU_R3000
2522 Please make sure to pick the right CPU type. Linux/MIPS is not
2523 designed to be generic, i.e. Kernels compiled for R3000 CPUs will
2524 *not* work on R4000 machines and vice versa. However, since most
2525 of the supported machines have an R4000 (or similar) CPU, R4x00
2526 might be a safe bet. If the resulting kernel does not work,
2527 try to recompile with R3000.
2529 R3000 MIPS Technologies R3000-series processors,
2530 including the 3041, 3051, and 3081.
2532 R6000 MIPS Technologies R6000-series processors,
2533 including the 64474, 64475, 64574 and 64575.
2535 R4300 MIPS Technologies R4300-series processors.
2537 R4x00 MIPS Technologies R4000-series processors other than 4300,
2538 including the 4640, 4650, and 4700.
2540 R5000 MIPS Technologies R5000-series processors other than the
2541 Nevada.
2543 R52xx MIPS Technologies R52xx-series ("Nevada") processors.
2545 R10000 MIPS Technologies R10000-series processors.
2547 SB1 Broadcom SiByte SB1 processor.
2549 R6000
2550 CONFIG_CPU_R6000
2551 MIPS Technologies R6000-series processors, including the 64474,
2552 64475, 64574 and 64575.
2554 R4300
2555 CONFIG_CPU_R4300
2556 MIPS Technologies R4300-series processors.
2558 R4x00
2559 CONFIG_CPU_R4X00
2560 MIPS Technologies R4000-series processors other than 4300, including
2561 the 4640, 4650, and 4700.
2563 R5000
2564 CONFIG_CPU_R5000
2565 MIPS Technologies R5000-series processors other than the Nevada.
2567 R52x0
2568 CONFIG_CPU_NEVADA
2569 MIPS Technologies R52x0-series ("Nevada") processors.
2571 R8000
2572 CONFIG_CPU_R8000
2573 MIPS Technologies R8000-series processors.
2575 R10000
2576 CONFIG_CPU_R10000
2577 MIPS Technologies R10000-series processors.
2579 SB1
2580 CONFIG_CPU_SB1
2581 Broadcom SiByte SB1 processor.
2583 Discontiguous Memory Support
2584 CONFIG_DISCONTIGMEM
2585 Say Y to support efficient handling of discontiguous physical memory,
2586 for architectures which are either NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory Access)
2587 or have huge holes in the physical address space for other reasons.
2588 See <file:Documentation/vm/numa> for more.
2590 Mapped kernel support
2591 CONFIG_MAPPED_KERNEL
2592 Change the way a Linux kernel is loaded unto memory on a MIPS64
2593 machine. This is required in order to support text replication and
2594 NUMA. If you need to understand it, read the source code.
2596 Kernel text replication support
2597 CONFIG_REPLICATE_KTEXT
2598 Say Y here to enable replicating the kernel text across multiple
2599 nodes in a NUMA cluster. This trades memory for speed.
2601 Exception handler replication support
2602 CONFIG_REPLICATE_EXHANDLERS
2603 Say Y here to enable replicating the kernel exception handlers
2604 across multiple nodes in a NUMA cluster. This trades memory for
2605 speed.
2607 NUMA support?
2608 CONFIG_NUMA
2609 Say Y to compile the kernel to support NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory
2610 Access). This option is for configuring high-end multiprocessor
2611 server machines. If in doubt, say N.
2613 R41xx
2614 CONFIG_CPU_VR41XX
2615 The options selects support for the NEC VR41xx series of processors.
2616 Only choose this option if you have one of these processors as a
2617 kernel built with this option will not run on any other type of
2618 processor or vice versa.
2620 CPU feature configuration
2621 CONFIG_CPU_ADVANCED
2622 Saying yes here allows you to select support for various features
2623 your CPU may or may not have. Most people should say N here.
2625 ll and sc instructions available
2626 CONFIG_CPU_HAS_LLSC
2627 MIPS R4000 series and later provide the Load Linked (ll)
2628 and Store Conditional (sc) instructions. More information is
2629 available at <http://www.go-ecs.com/mips/miptek1.htm>.
2631 Say Y here if your CPU has the ll and sc instructions. Say Y here
2632 for better performance, N if you don't know. You must say Y here
2633 for multiprocessor machines.
2635 lld and scd instructions available
2636 CONFIG_CPU_HAS_LLDSCD
2637 Say Y here if your CPU has the lld and scd instructions, the 64-bit
2638 equivalents of ll and sc. Say Y here for better performance, N if
2639 you don't know. You must say Y here for multiprocessor machines.
2641 Writeback Buffer available
2642 CONFIG_CPU_HAS_WB
2643 Say N here for slightly better performance. You must say Y here for
2644 machines which require flushing of write buffers in software. Saying
2645 Y is the safe option; N may result in kernel malfunction and crashes.
2647 Support for large 64-bit configurations
2648 CONFIG_MIPS_INSANE_LARGE
2649 MIPS R10000 does support a 44 bit / 16TB address space as opposed to
2650 previous 64-bit processors which only supported 40 bit / 1TB. If you
2651 need processes of more than 1TB virtual address space, say Y here.
2652 This will result in additional memory usage, so it is not
2653 recommended for normal users.
2655 Generate little endian code
2656 CONFIG_CPU_LITTLE_ENDIAN
2657 Some MIPS machines can be configured for either little or big endian
2658 byte order. These modes require different kernels. Say Y if your
2659 machine is little endian, N if it's a big endian machine.
2661 Use power LED as a heartbeat
2662 CONFIG_HEARTBEAT
2663 Use the power-on LED on your machine as a load meter. The exact
2664 behaviour is platform-dependent, but normally the flash frequency is
2665 a hyperbolic function of the 5-minute load average.
2667 Networking support
2668 CONFIG_NET
2669 Unless you really know what you are doing, you should say Y here.
2670 The reason is that some programs need kernel networking support even
2671 when running on a stand-alone machine that isn't connected to any
2672 other computer. If you are upgrading from an older kernel, you
2673 should consider updating your networking tools too because changes
2674 in the kernel and the tools often go hand in hand. The tools are
2675 contained in the package net-tools, the location and version number
2676 of which are given in <file:Documentation/Changes>.
2678 For a general introduction to Linux networking, it is highly
2679 recommended to read the NET-HOWTO, available from
2680 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
2682 Socket filtering
2683 CONFIG_FILTER
2684 The Linux Socket Filter is derived from the Berkeley Packet Filter.
2685 If you say Y here, user-space programs can attach a filter to any
2686 socket and thereby tell the kernel that it should allow or disallow
2687 certain types of data to get through the socket. Linux Socket
2688 Filtering works on all socket types except TCP for now. See the
2689 text file <file:Documentation/networking/filter.txt> for more
2690 information.
2692 You need to say Y here if you want to use PPP packet filtering
2693 (see the CONFIG_PPP_FILTER option below).
2695 If unsure, say N.
2697 Network packet filtering (replaces ipchains)
2698 CONFIG_NETFILTER
2699 Netfilter is a framework for filtering and mangling network packets
2700 that pass through your Linux box.
2702 The most common use of packet filtering is to run your Linux box as
2703 a firewall protecting a local network from the Internet. The type of
2704 firewall provided by this kernel support is called a "packet
2705 filter", which means that it can reject individual network packets
2706 based on type, source, destination etc. The other kind of firewall,
2707 a "proxy-based" one, is more secure but more intrusive and more
2708 bothersome to set up; it inspects the network traffic much more
2709 closely, modifies it and has knowledge about the higher level
2710 protocols, which a packet filter lacks. Moreover, proxy-based
2711 firewalls often require changes to the programs running on the local
2712 clients. Proxy-based firewalls don't need support by the kernel, but
2713 they are often combined with a packet filter, which only works if
2714 you say Y here.
2716 You should also say Y here if you intend to use your Linux box as
2717 the gateway to the Internet for a local network of machines without
2718 globally valid IP addresses. This is called "masquerading": if one
2719 of the computers on your local network wants to send something to
2720 the outside, your box can "masquerade" as that computer, i.e. it
2721 forwards the traffic to the intended outside destination, but
2722 modifies the packets to make it look like they came from the
2723 firewall box itself. It works both ways: if the outside host
2724 replies, the Linux box will silently forward the traffic to the
2725 correct local computer. This way, the computers on your local net
2726 are completely invisible to the outside world, even though they can
2727 reach the outside and can receive replies. It is even possible to
2728 run globally visible servers from within a masqueraded local network
2729 using a mechanism called portforwarding. Masquerading is also often
2730 called NAT (Network Address Translation).
2732 Another use of Netfilter is in transparent proxying: if a machine on
2733 the local network tries to connect to an outside host, your Linux
2734 box can transparently forward the traffic to a local server,
2735 typically a caching proxy server.
2737 Various modules exist for netfilter which replace the previous
2738 masquerading (ipmasqadm), packet filtering (ipchains), transparent
2739 proxying, and portforwarding mechanisms. Please see
2740 <file:Documentation/Changes> under "iptables" for the location of
2741 these packages.
2743 Make sure to say N to "Fast switching" below if you intend to say Y
2744 here, as Fast switching currently bypasses netfilter.
2746 Chances are that you should say Y here if you compile a kernel which
2747 will run as a router and N for regular hosts. If unsure, say N.
2749 Network packet filtering debugging
2750 CONFIG_NETFILTER_DEBUG
2751 You can say Y here if you want to get additional messages useful in
2752 debugging the netfilter code.
2754 Connection tracking (required for masq/NAT)
2755 CONFIG_IP_NF_CONNTRACK
2756 Connection tracking keeps a record of what packets have passed
2757 through your machine, in order to figure out how they are related
2758 into connections.
2760 This is required to do Masquerading or other kinds of Network
2761 Address Translation (except for Fast NAT). It can also be used to
2762 enhance packet filtering (see `Connection state match support'
2763 below).
2765 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2766 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2768 Amanda protocol support
2769 CONFIG_IP_NF_AMANDA
2770 If you are running the Amanda backup package (http://www.amanda.org/)
2771 on this machine or machines that will be MASQUERADED through this
2772 machine, then you may want to enable this feature. This allows the
2773 connection tracking and natting code to allow the sub-channels that
2774 Amanda requires for communication of the backup data, messages and
2775 index.
2777 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2778 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2781 IRC Send/Chat protocol support
2782 CONFIG_IP_NF_IRC
2783 There is a commonly-used extension to IRC called
2784 Direct Client-to-Client Protocol (DCC). This enables users to send
2785 files to each other, and also chat to each other without the need
2786 of a server. DCC Sending is used anywhere you send files over IRC,
2787 and DCC Chat is most commonly used by Eggdrop bots. If you are
2788 using NAT, this extension will enable you to send files and initiate
2789 chats. Note that you do NOT need this extension to get files or
2790 have others initiate chats, or everything else in IRC.
2792 If you want to compile it as a module, say 'M' here and read
2793 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say 'N'.
2795 TFTP protocol support
2796 CONFIG_IP_NF_TFTP
2797 TFTP connection tracking helper, this is required depending
2798 on how restrictive your ruleset is.
2799 If you are using a tftp client behind -j SNAT or -j MASQUERADING
2800 you will need this.
2802 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2803 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `Y'.
2805 FTP protocol support
2806 CONFIG_IP_NF_FTP
2807 Tracking FTP connections is problematic: special helpers are
2808 required for tracking them, and doing masquerading and other forms
2809 of Network Address Translation on them.
2811 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2812 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `Y'.
2814 User space queueing via NETLINK
2815 CONFIG_IP_NF_QUEUE
2816 Netfilter has the ability to queue packets to user space: the
2817 netlink device can be used to access them using this driver.
2819 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2820 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2822 IP tables support (required for filtering/masq/NAT)
2823 CONFIG_IP_NF_IPTABLES
2824 iptables is a general, extensible packet identification framework.
2825 The packet filtering and full NAT (masquerading, port forwarding,
2826 etc) subsystems now use this: say `Y' or `M' here if you want to use
2827 either of those.
2829 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2830 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2832 recent match support
2833 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_RECENT
2834 This match is used for creating one or many lists of recently
2835 used addresses and then matching against that/those list(s).
2837 Short options are available by using 'iptables -m recent -h'
2838 Official Website: <http://snowman.net/projects/ipt_recent/>
2840 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2841 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2843 limit match support
2844 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_LIMIT
2845 limit matching allows you to control the rate at which a rule can be
2846 matched: mainly useful in combination with the LOG target ("LOG
2847 target support", below) and to avoid some Denial of Service attacks.
2849 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2850 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2852 skb->pkt_type packet match support
2853 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_PKTTYPE
2854 This patch allows you to match packet in accrodance
2855 to its "class", eg. BROADCAST, MULTICAST, ...
2857 Typical usage:
2858 iptables -A INPUT -m pkttype --pkt-type broadcast -j LOG
2860 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2861 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2863 MAC address match support
2864 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MAC
2865 MAC matching allows you to match packets based on the source
2866 Ethernet address of the packet.
2868 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2869 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2871 Netfilter MARK match support
2872 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MARK
2873 Netfilter mark matching allows you to match packets based on the
2874 `nfmark' value in the packet. This can be set by the MARK target
2875 (see below).
2877 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2878 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2880 Multiple port match support
2881 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MULTIPORT
2882 Multiport matching allows you to match TCP or UDP packets based on
2883 a series of source or destination ports: normally a rule can only
2884 match a single range of ports.
2886 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2887 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2889 TTL match support
2890 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TTL
2891 This adds CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TTL option, which enabled the user
2892 to match packets by their TTL value.
2894 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2895 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2897 LENGTH match support
2898 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_LENGTH
2899 This option allows you to match the length of a packet against a
2900 specific value or range of values.
2902 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2903 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2905 AH/ESP match support
2906 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_AH_ESP
2907 These two match extensions (`ah' and `esp') allow you to match a
2908 range of SPIs inside AH or ESP headers of IPSec packets.
2910 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2911 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2913 DSCP match support
2914 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_DSCP
2915 This option adds a `DSCP' match, which allows you to match against
2916 the IPv4 header DSCP field (DSCP codepoint).
2918 The DSCP codepoint can have any value between 0x0 and 0x4f.
2920 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2921 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2925 ECN match support
2926 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_ECN
2927 This option adds a `ECN' match, which allows you to match against
2928 the IPv4 and TCP header ECN fields.
2930 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2931 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2935 TOS match support
2936 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TOS
2937 TOS matching allows you to match packets based on the Type Of
2938 Service fields of the IP packet.
2940 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2941 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2943 conntrack match support
2944 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_CONNTRACK
2945 This is a general conntrack match module, a superset of the state match.
2947 It allows matching on additional conntrack information, which is
2948 useful in complex configurations, such as NAT gateways with multiple
2949 internet links or tunnels.
2951 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2952 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
2955 Connection state match support
2956 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_STATE
2957 Connection state matching allows you to match packets based on their
2958 relationship to a tracked connection (ie. previous packets). This
2959 is a powerful tool for packet classification.
2961 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2962 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2964 Unclean match support
2965 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_UNCLEAN
2966 Unclean packet matching matches any strange or invalid packets, by
2967 looking at a series of fields in the IP, TCP, UDP and ICMP headers.
2969 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2970 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2972 Owner match support
2973 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_OWNER
2974 Packet owner matching allows you to match locally-generated packets
2975 based on who created them: the user, group, process or session.
2977 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2978 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2980 Packet filtering
2981 CONFIG_IP_NF_FILTER
2982 Packet filtering defines a table `filter', which has a series of
2983 rules for simple packet filtering at local input, forwarding and
2984 local output. See the man page for iptables(8).
2986 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2987 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2989 REJECT target support
2990 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_REJECT
2991 The REJECT target allows a filtering rule to specify that an ICMP
2992 error should be issued in response to an incoming packet, rather
2993 than silently being dropped.
2995 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
2996 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
2998 MIRROR target support
2999 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MIRROR
3000 The MIRROR target allows a filtering rule to specify that an
3001 incoming packet should be bounced back to the sender.
3003 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3004 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3006 Local NAT support
3007 CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT_LOCAL
3008 This option enables support for NAT of locally originated connections.
3009 Enable this if you need to use destination NAT on connections
3010 originating from local processes on the nat box itself.
3012 Please note that you will need a recent version (>= 1.2.6a)
3013 of the iptables userspace program in order to use this feature.
3014 See <http://www.iptables.org/> for download instructions.
3016 If unsure, say 'N'.
3019 Full NAT (Network Address Translation)
3020 CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT
3021 The Full NAT option allows masquerading, port forwarding and other
3022 forms of full Network Address Port Translation. It is controlled by
3023 the `nat' table in iptables: see the man page for iptables(8).
3025 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3026 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3028 MASQUERADE target support
3029 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MASQUERADE
3030 Masquerading is a special case of NAT: all outgoing connections are
3031 changed to seem to come from a particular interface's address, and
3032 if the interface goes down, those connections are lost. This is
3033 only useful for dialup accounts with dynamic IP address (ie. your IP
3034 address will be different on next dialup).
3036 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3037 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3039 Basic SNMP-ALG support
3040 CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT_SNMP_BASIC
3042 This module implements an Application Layer Gateway (ALG) for
3043 SNMP payloads. In conjunction with NAT, it allows a network
3044 management system to access multiple private networks with
3045 conflicting addresses. It works by modifying IP addresses
3046 inside SNMP payloads to match IP-layer NAT mapping.
3048 This is the "basic" form of SNMP-ALG, as described in RFC 2962
3050 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3051 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3053 REDIRECT target support
3054 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_REDIRECT
3055 REDIRECT is a special case of NAT: all incoming connections are
3056 mapped onto the incoming interface's address, causing the packets to
3057 come to the local machine instead of passing through. This is
3058 useful for transparent proxies.
3060 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3061 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3063 Packet mangling
3064 CONFIG_IP_NF_MANGLE
3065 This option adds a `mangle' table to iptables: see the man page for
3066 iptables(8). This table is used for various packet alterations
3067 which can effect how the packet is routed.
3069 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3070 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3072 DSCP target support
3073 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_DSCP
3074 This option adds a `DSCP' target, which allows you to create rules in
3075 the iptables mangle table. The selected packet has the DSCP field set
3076 to the hex value provided on the command line; unlike the TOS target
3077 which will only set the legal values within ip.h.
3079 The DSCP field can be set to any value between 0x0 and 0x4f. It does
3080 take into account that bits 6 and 7 are used by ECN.
3082 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3083 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
3087 ECN target support
3088 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_ECN
3089 This option adds a `ECN' target, which can be used in the iptables mangle
3090 table.
3092 You can use this target to remove the ECN bits from the IPv4 header of
3093 an IP packet. This is particularly useful, if you need to work around
3094 existing ECN blackholes on the internet, but don't want to disable
3095 ECN support in general.
3097 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3098 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
3102 TOS target support
3103 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TOS
3104 This option adds a `TOS' target, which allows you to create rules in
3105 the `mangle' table which alter the Type Of Service field of an IP
3106 packet prior to routing.
3108 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3109 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3111 MARK target support
3112 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MARK
3113 This option adds a `MARK' target, which allows you to create rules
3114 in the `mangle' table which alter the netfilter mark (nfmark) field
3115 associated with the packet prior to routing. This can change
3116 the routing method (see `Use netfilter MARK value as routing
3117 key') and can also be used by other subsystems to change their
3118 behaviour.
3120 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3121 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3123 TCPMSS target support
3124 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS
3125 This option adds a `TCPMSS' target, which allows you to alter the
3126 MSS value of TCP SYN packets, to control the maximum size for that
3127 connection (usually limiting it to your outgoing interface's MTU
3128 minus 40).
3130 This is used to overcome criminally braindead ISPs or servers which
3131 block ICMP Fragmentation Needed packets. The symptoms of this
3132 problem are that everything works fine from your Linux
3133 firewall/router, but machines behind it can never exchange large
3134 packets:
3135 1) Web browsers connect, then hang with no data received.
3136 2) Small mail works fine, but large emails hang.
3137 3) ssh works fine, but scp hangs after initial handshaking.
3139 Workaround: activate this option and add a rule to your firewall
3140 configuration like:
3142 iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN \
3143 -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu
3145 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3146 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3148 Helper match support
3149 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_HELPER
3150 Helper matching allows you to match packets in dynamic connections
3151 tracked by a conntrack-helper, ie. ip_conntrack_ftp
3153 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3154 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `Y'.
3156 TCPMSS match support
3157 CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TCPMSS
3158 This option adds a `tcpmss' match, which allows you to examine the
3159 MSS value of TCP SYN packets, which control the maximum packet size
3160 for that connection.
3162 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3163 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3165 ULOG target support
3166 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_ULOG
3167 This option adds a `ULOG' target, which allows you to create rules in
3168 any iptables table. The packet is passed to a userspace logging
3169 daemon using netlink multicast sockets; unlike the LOG target
3170 which can only be viewed through syslog.
3172 The appropriate userspace logging daemon (ulogd) may be obtained from
3173 <http://www.gnumonks.org/projects/ulogd>
3175 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3176 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
3178 LOG target support
3179 CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_LOG
3180 This option adds a `LOG' target, which allows you to create rules in
3181 any iptables table which records the packet header to the syslog.
3183 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3184 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3186 ipchains (2.2-style) support
3187 CONFIG_IP_NF_COMPAT_IPCHAINS
3188 This option places ipchains (with masquerading and redirection
3189 support) back into the kernel, using the new netfilter
3190 infrastructure. It is not recommended for new installations (see
3191 `Packet filtering'). With this enabled, you should be able to use
3192 the ipchains tool exactly as in 2.2 kernels.
3194 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3195 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3197 ipfwadm (2.0-style) support
3198 CONFIG_IP_NF_COMPAT_IPFWADM
3199 This option places ipfwadm (with masquerading and redirection
3200 support) back into the kernel, using the new netfilter
3201 infrastructure. It is not recommended for new installations (see
3202 `Packet filtering'). With this enabled, you should be able to use
3203 the ipfwadm tool exactly as in 2.0 kernels.
3205 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3206 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3208 EUI64 address check (EXPERIMENTAL)
3209 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_EUI64
3210 This module performs checking on the IPv6 source address
3211 Compares the last 64 bits with the EUI64 (delivered
3212 from the MAC address) address
3214 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3215 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
3217 MAC address match support
3218 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_MAC
3219 mac matching allows you to match packets based on the source
3220 Ethernet address of the packet.
3222 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3223 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3225 length match support
3226 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_LENGTH
3227 This option allows you to match the length of a packet against a
3228 specific value or range of values.
3230 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3231 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
3233 Netfilter MARK match support
3234 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_MARK
3235 Netfilter mark matching allows you to match packets based on the
3236 `nfmark' value in the packet. This can be set by the MARK target
3237 (see below).
3239 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3240 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3242 Multiple port match support
3243 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_MULTIPORT
3244 Multiport matching allows you to match TCP or UDP packets based on
3245 a series of source or destination ports: normally a rule can only
3246 match a single range of ports.
3248 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3249 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3251 IPV6 queue handler (EXPERIMENTAL)
3252 CONFIG_IP6_NF_QUEUE
3254 This option adds a queue handler to the kernel for IPv6
3255 packets which lets us to receive the filtered packets
3256 with QUEUE target using libiptc as we can do with
3257 the IPv4 now.
3259 (C) Fernando Anton 2001
3260 IPv64 Project - Work based in IPv64 draft by Arturo Azcorra.
3261 Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
3262 Universidad Politecnica de Alcala de Henares
3263 email: fanton@it.uc3m.es
3265 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3266 Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
3268 Owner match support
3269 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_OWNER
3270 Packet owner matching allows you to match locally-generated packets
3271 based on who created them: the user, group, process or session.
3273 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3274 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3276 Packet filtering
3277 CONFIG_IP6_NF_FILTER
3278 Packet filtering defines a table `filter', which has a series of
3279 rules for simple packet filtering at local input, forwarding and
3280 local output. See the man page for iptables(8).
3282 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3283 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3285 Packet mangling
3286 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MANGLE
3287 This option adds a `mangle' table to iptables: see the man page for
3288 iptables(8). This table is used for various packet alterations
3289 which can effect how the packet is routed.
3291 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3292 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3294 MARK target support
3295 CONFIG_IP6_NF_TARGET_MARK
3296 This option adds a `MARK' target, which allows you to create rules
3297 in the `mangle' table which alter the netfilter mark (nfmark) field
3298 associated with the packet packet prior to routing. This can change
3299 the routing method (see `Use netfilter MARK value as routing
3300 key') and can also be used by other subsystems to change their
3301 behaviour.
3303 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3304 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3306 ARP tables support
3307 CONFIG_IP_NF_ARPTABLES
3308 arptables is a general, extensible packet identification framework.
3309 The ARP packet filtering and mangling (manipulation)subsystems
3310 use this: say Y or M here if you want to use either of those.
3312 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3313 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3315 ARP packet filtering
3316 CONFIG_IP_NF_ARPFILTER
3317 ARP packet filtering defines a table `filter', which has a series of
3318 rules for simple ARP packet filtering at local input and
3319 local output. See the man page for arptables(8).
3321 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3322 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3324 ARP payload mangling
3325 CONFIG_IP_NF_ARP_MANGLE
3326 Allows altering the ARP packet payload: source and destination
3327 hardware and network addresses.
3329 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3330 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3332 TCP Explicit Congestion Notification support
3333 CONFIG_INET_ECN
3334 Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) allows routers to notify
3335 clients about network congestion, resulting in fewer dropped packets
3336 and increased network performance. This option adds ECN support to
3337 the Linux kernel, as well as a sysctl (/proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_ecn)
3338 which allows ECN support to be disabled at runtime.
3340 Note that, on the Internet, there are many broken firewalls which
3341 refuse connections from ECN-enabled machines, and it may be a while
3342 before these firewalls are fixed. Until then, to access a site
3343 behind such a firewall (some of which are major sites, at the time
3344 of this writing) you will have to disable this option, either by
3345 saying N now or by using the sysctl.
3347 If in doubt, say N.
3349 IPv6 tables support (required for filtering/masq/NAT)
3350 CONFIG_IP6_NF_IPTABLES
3351 ip6tables is a general, extensible packet identification framework.
3352 Currently only the packet filtering and packet mangling subsystem
3353 for IPv6 use this, but connection tracking is going to follow.
3354 Say 'Y' or 'M' here if you want to use either of those.
3356 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3357 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3359 IPv6 limit match support
3360 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_LIMIT
3361 limit matching allows you to control the rate at which a rule can be
3362 matched: mainly useful in combination with the LOG target ("LOG
3363 target support", below) and to avoid some Denial of Service attacks.
3365 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3366 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3368 LOG target support
3369 CONFIG_IP6_NF_TARGET_LOG
3370 This option adds a `LOG' target, which allows you to create rules in
3371 any iptables table which records the packet header to the syslog.
3373 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3374 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. If unsure, say `N'.
3376 IP: virtual server support
3377 CONFIG_IP_VS
3378 IP Virtual Server support will let you build a high-performance
3379 virtual server based on cluster of two or more real servers. This
3380 option must be enabled for at least one of the clustered computers
3381 that will take care of intercepting incomming connections to a
3382 single IP address and scheduling them to real servers.
3384 Three request dispatching techniques are implemented, they are
3385 virtual server via NAT, virtual server via tunneling and virtual
3386 server via direct routing. The several scheduling algorithms can
3387 be used to choose which server the connection is directed to,
3388 thus load balancing can be achieved among the servers. For more
3389 information and its administration program, please visit the
3390 following URL:
3391 http://www.linuxvirtualserver.org/
3393 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3394 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3395 unsure, say N.
3397 IP virtual server debugging
3398 CONFIG_IP_VS_DEBUG
3399 Say Y here if you want to get additional messages useful in
3400 debugging the IP virtual server code. You can change the debug
3401 level in /proc/sys/net/ipv4/vs/debug_level
3403 IPVS connection hash table size (the Nth power of 2)
3404 CONFIG_IP_VS_TAB_BITS
3405 The IPVS connection hash table uses the chaining scheme to handle
3406 hash collisions. Using a big IPVS connection hash table will greatly
3407 reduce conflicts when there are hundreds of thousands of connections
3408 in the hash table.
3410 Note the table size must be power of 2. The table size will be the
3411 value of 2 to the your input number power. The number to choose is
3412 from 8 to 20, the default number is 12, which means the table size
3413 is 4096. Don't input the number too small, otherwise you will lose
3414 performance on it. You can adapt the table size yourself, according
3415 to your virtual server application. It is good to set the table size
3416 not far less than the number of connections per second multiplying
3417 average lasting time of connection in the table. For example, your
3418 virtual server gets 200 connections per second, the connection lasts
3419 for 200 seconds in average in the connection table, the table size
3420 should be not far less than 200x200, it is good to set the table
3421 size 32768 (2**15).
3423 Another note that each connection occupies 128 bytes effectively and
3424 each hash entry uses 8 bytes, so you can estimate how much memory is
3425 needed for your box.
3427 IPVS: round-robin scheduling
3428 CONFIG_IP_VS_RR
3429 The robin-robin scheduling algorithm simply directs network
3430 connections to different real servers in a round-robin manner.
3432 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3433 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3434 unsure, say N.
3436 IPVS: weighted round-robin scheduling
3437 CONFIG_IP_VS_WRR
3438 The weighted robin-robin scheduling algorithm directs network
3439 connections to different real servers based on server weights
3440 in a round-robin manner. Servers with higher weights receive
3441 new connections first than those with less weights, and servers
3442 with higher weights get more connections than those with less
3443 weights and servers with equal weights get equal connections.
3445 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3446 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3447 unsure, say N.
3449 IPVS: least-connection scheduling
3450 CONFIG_IP_VS_LC
3451 The least-connection scheduling algorithm directs network
3452 connections to the server with the least number of active
3453 connections.
3455 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3456 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3457 unsure, say N.
3459 IPVS: weighted least-connection scheduling
3460 CONFIG_IP_VS_WLC
3461 The weighted least-connection scheduling algorithm directs network
3462 connections to the server with the least active connections
3463 normalized by the server weight.
3465 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3466 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3467 unsure, say N.
3469 IPVS: locality-based least-connection scheduling
3470 CONFIG_IP_VS_LBLC
3471 The locality-based least-connection scheduling algorithm is for
3472 destination IP load balancing. It is usually used in cache cluster.
3473 This algorithm usually directs packet destined for an IP address to
3474 its server if the server is alive and under load. If the server is
3475 overloaded (its active connection numbers is larger than its weight)
3476 and there is a server in its half load, then allocate the weighted
3477 least-connection server to this IP address.
3479 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3480 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3481 unsure, say N.
3483 IPVS: locality-based least-connection with replication scheduling
3484 CONFIG_IP_VS_LBLCR
3485 The locality-based least-connection with replication scheduling
3486 algorithm is also for destination IP load balancing. It is
3487 usually used in cache cluster. It differs from the LBLC scheduling
3488 as follows: the load balancer maintains mappings from a target
3489 to a set of server nodes that can serve the target. Requests for
3490 a target are assigned to the least-connection node in the target's
3491 server set. If all the node in the server set are over loaded,
3492 it picks up a least-connection node in the cluster and adds it
3493 in the sever set for the target. If the server set has not been
3494 modified for the specified time, the most loaded node is removed
3495 from the server set, in order to avoid high degree of replication.
3497 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3498 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3499 unsure, say N.
3501 IPVS: destination hashing scheduling
3502 CONFIG_IP_VS_DH
3503 The destination hashing scheduling algorithm assigns network
3504 connections to the servers through looking up a statically assigned
3505 hash table by their destination IP addresses.
3507 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3508 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3509 unsure, say N.
3511 IPVS: source hashing scheduling
3512 CONFIG_IP_VS_SH
3513 The source hashing scheduling algorithm assigns network
3514 connections to the servers through looking up a statically assigned
3515 hash table by their source IP addresses.
3517 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3518 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3519 unsure, say N.
3521 IPVS: shortest expected delay scheduling
3522 CONFIG_IP_VS_SED
3523 The shortest expected delay scheduling algorithm assigns network
3524 connections to the server with the shortest expected delay. The
3525 expected delay that the job will experience is (Ci + 1) / Ui if
3526 sent to the ith server, in which Ci is the number of connections
3527 on the the ith server and Ui is the fixed service rate (weight)
3528 of the ith server.
3530 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3531 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3532 unsure, say N.
3534 IPVS: never queue scheduling
3535 CONFIG_IP_VS_NQ
3536 The never queue scheduling algorithm adopts a two-speed model.
3537 When there is an idle server available, the job will be sent to
3538 the idle server, instead of waiting for a fast one. When there
3539 is no idle server available, the job will be sent to the server
3540 that minimize its expected delay (The Shortest Expected Delay
3541 scheduling algorithm).
3543 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3544 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3545 unsure, say N.
3547 IPVS: FTP protocol helper
3548 CONFIG_IP_VS_FTP
3549 FTP is a protocol that transfers IP address and/or port number in
3550 the payload. In the virtual server via Network Address Translation,
3551 the IP address and port number of real servers cannot be sent to
3552 clients in ftp connections directly, so FTP protocol helper is
3553 required for tracking the connection and mangling it back to that of
3554 virtual service.
3556 If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
3557 it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
3558 unsure, say N.
3560 AH/ESP match support (EXPERIMENTAL)
3561 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_AHESP
3562 This module allows one to match AH and ESP packets.
3564 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3565 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The modules will be called
3566 ip6t_ah.o and ip6t_esp.o.
3568 If unsure, say 'N'.
3570 Routing header match support
3571 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_RT
3572 rt matching allows you to match packets based on the routing
3573 header of the packet.
3575 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3576 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
3577 ip6t_rt.o.
3579 If unsure, say 'N'.
3581 Hop-by-hop and Dst opts header match support
3582 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_OPTS
3583 This allows one to match packets based on the hop-by-hop
3584 and destination options headers of a packet.
3586 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3587 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The modules will be called
3588 ip6t_hbh.o and ip6t_dst.o.
3590 If unsure, say 'N'.
3592 Fragmentation header match support
3593 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_FRAG
3594 frag matching allows you to match packets based on the fragmentation
3595 header of the packet.
3597 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3598 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
3599 ip6t_frag.o.
3601 If unsure, say 'N'.
3603 HL match support
3604 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_HL
3605 HL matching allows you to match packets based on the hop
3606 limit of the packet.
3608 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3609 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
3610 ip6t_hl.o.
3612 If unsure, say 'N'.
3614 IPv6 Extension Headers Match (EXPERIMENTAL)
3615 CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_IPV6HEADER
3616 This module allows one to match packets based upon
3617 the ipv6 extension headers.
3619 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
3620 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
3621 ip6t_ipv6header.o.
3623 If unsure, say 'N'.
3625 SYN flood protection
3626 CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES
3627 Normal TCP/IP networking is open to an attack known as "SYN
3628 flooding". This denial-of-service attack prevents legitimate remote
3629 users from being able to connect to your computer during an ongoing
3630 attack and requires very little work from the attacker, who can
3631 operate from anywhere on the Internet.
3633 SYN cookies provide protection against this type of attack. If you
3634 say Y here, the TCP/IP stack will use a cryptographic challenge
3635 protocol known as "SYN cookies" to enable legitimate users to
3636 continue to connect, even when your machine is under attack. There
3637 is no need for the legitimate users to change their TCP/IP software;
3638 SYN cookies work transparently to them. For technical information
3639 about SYN cookies, check out <http://cr.yp.to/syncookies.html>.
3641 If you are SYN flooded, the source address reported by the kernel is
3642 likely to have been forged by the attacker; it is only reported as
3643 an aid in tracing the packets to their actual source and should not
3644 be taken as absolute truth.
3646 SYN cookies may prevent correct error reporting on clients when the
3647 server is really overloaded. If this happens frequently better turn
3648 them off.
3650 If you say Y here, note that SYN cookies aren't enabled by default;
3651 you can enable them by saying Y to "/proc file system support" and
3652 "Sysctl support" below and executing the command
3654 echo 1 >/proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_syncookies
3656 at boot time after the /proc file system has been mounted.
3658 If unsure, say N.
3660 # Choice: alphatype
3661 Alpha system type
3662 CONFIG_ALPHA_GENERIC
3663 This is the system type of your hardware. A "generic" kernel will
3664 run on any supported Alpha system. However, if you configure a
3665 kernel for your specific system, it will be faster and smaller.
3667 To find out what type of Alpha system you have, you may want to
3668 check out the Linux/Alpha FAQ, accessible on the WWW from
3669 <http://www.alphalinux.org/>. In summary:
3671 Alcor/Alpha-XLT AS 600
3672 Alpha-XL XL-233, XL-266
3673 AlphaBook1 Alpha laptop
3674 Avanti AS 200, AS 205, AS 250, AS 255, AS 300, AS 400
3675 Cabriolet AlphaPC64, AlphaPCI64
3676 DP264 DP264
3677 EB164 EB164 21164 evaluation board
3678 EB64+ EB64+ 21064 evaluation board
3679 EB66 EB66 21066 evaluation board
3680 EB66+ EB66+ 21066 evaluation board
3681 Jensen DECpc 150, DEC 2000 model 300,
3682 DEC 2000 model 500
3683 LX164 AlphaPC164-LX
3684 Miata Personal Workstation 433a, 433au, 500a,
3685 500au, 600a, or 600au
3686 Mikasa AS 1000
3687 Noname AXPpci33, UDB (Multia)
3688 Noritake AS 1000A, AS 600A, AS 800
3689 PC164 AlphaPC164
3690 Rawhide AS 1200, AS 4000, AS 4100
3691 Ruffian RPX164-2, AlphaPC164-UX, AlphaPC164-BX
3692 SX164 AlphaPC164-SX
3693 Sable AS 2000, AS 2100
3694 Shark DS 20L
3695 Takara Takara
3696 Titan Privateer
3697 Wildfire AlphaServer GS 40/80/160/320
3699 If you don't know what to do, choose "generic".
3701 # Most of the information on these variants is from
3702 # <http://www.alphalinux.org/docs/alpha-howto.html>
3703 Alcor/Alpha-XLT
3704 CONFIG_ALPHA_ALCOR
3705 For systems using the Digital ALCOR chipset: 5 chips (4, 64-bit data
3706 slices (Data Switch, DSW) - 208-pin PQFP and 1 control (Control, I/O
3707 Address, CIA) - a 383 pin plastic PGA). It provides a DRAM
3708 controller (256-bit memory bus) and a PCI interface. It also does
3709 all the work required to support an external Bcache and to maintain
3710 memory coherence when a PCI device DMAs into (or out of) memory.
3712 Alpha-XL
3713 CONFIG_ALPHA_XL
3714 XL-233 and XL-266-based Alpha systems.
3716 AlphaBook1
3717 CONFIG_ALPHA_BOOK1
3718 Dec AlphaBook1/Burns Alpha-based laptops.
3720 Avanti
3721 CONFIG_ALPHA_AVANTI
3722 Avanti AS 200, AS 205, AS 250, AS 255, AS 300, and AS 400-based
3723 Alphas. Info at
3724 <http://www.unix-ag.org/Linux-Alpha/Architectures/Avanti.html>.
3726 Cabriolet
3727 CONFIG_ALPHA_CABRIOLET
3728 Cabriolet AlphaPC64, AlphaPCI64 systems. Derived from EB64+ but now
3729 baby-AT with Flash boot ROM, no on-board SCSI or Ethernet. 3 ISA
3730 slots, 4 PCI slots (one pair are on a shared slot), uses plug-in
3731 Bcache SIMMs. Requires power supply with 3.3V output.
3733 DP264
3734 CONFIG_ALPHA_DP264
3735 Various 21264 systems with the tsunami core logic chipset.
3736 API Networks: 264DP, UP2000(+), CS20;
3737 Compaq: DS10(E,L), XP900, XP1000, DS20(E), ES40.
3739 EB164
3740 CONFIG_ALPHA_EB164
3741 EB164 21164 evaluation board from DEC. Uses 21164 and ALCOR. Has
3742 ISA and PCI expansion (3 ISA slots, 2 64-bit PCI slots (one is
3743 shared with an ISA slot) and 2 32-bit PCI slots. Uses plus-in
3744 Bcache SIMMs. I/O sub-system provides SuperI/O (2S, 1P, FD), KBD,
3745 MOUSE (PS2 style), RTC/NVRAM. Boot ROM is Flash. PC-AT-sized
3746 motherboard. Requires power supply with 3.3V output.
3748 EB64+
3749 CONFIG_ALPHA_EB64P
3750 Uses 21064 or 21064A and APECs. Has ISA and PCI expansion (3 ISA,
3751 2 PCI, one pair are on a shared slot). Supports 36-bit DRAM SIMs.
3752 ISA bus generated by Intel SaturnI/O PCI-ISA bridge. On-board SCSI
3753 (NCR 810 on PCI) Ethernet (Digital 21040), KBD, MOUSE (PS2 style),
3754 SuperI/O (2S, 1P, FD), RTC/NVRAM. Boot ROM is EPROM. PC-AT size.
3755 Runs from standard PC power supply.
3757 EB66
3758 CONFIG_ALPHA_EB66
3759 A Digital DS group board. Uses 21066 or 21066A. I/O sub-system is
3760 identical to EB64+. Baby PC-AT size. Runs from standard PC power
3761 supply. The EB66 schematic was published as a marketing poster
3762 advertising the 21066 as "the first microprocessor in the world with
3763 embedded PCI".
3765 EB66+
3766 CONFIG_ALPHA_EB66P
3767 Later variant of the EB66 board.
3769 Eiger
3770 CONFIG_ALPHA_EIGER
3771 Apparently an obscure OEM single-board computer based on the
3772 Typhoon/Tsunami chipset family. Information on it is scanty.
3774 Jensen
3775 CONFIG_ALPHA_JENSEN
3776 DEC PC 150 AXP (aka Jensen): This is a very old Digital system - one
3777 of the first-generation Alpha systems. A number of these systems
3778 seem to be available on the second- hand market. The Jensen is a
3779 floor-standing tower system which originally used a 150MHz 21064 It
3780 used programmable logic to interface a 486 EISA I/O bridge to the
3781 CPU.
3783 LX164
3784 CONFIG_ALPHA_LX164
3785 A technical overview of this board is available at
3786 <http://www.unix-ag.org/Linux-Alpha/Architectures/LX164.html>.
3788 Miata
3789 CONFIG_ALPHA_MIATA
3790 The Digital PersonalWorkStation (PWS 433a, 433au, 500a, 500au, 600a,
3791 or 600au). There is an Installation HOWTO for this hardware at
3792 <http://members.brabant.chello.nl/~s.vandereijk/miata.html>.
3794 Mikasa
3795 CONFIG_ALPHA_MIKASA
3796 AlphaServer 1000-based Alpha systems.
3798 Nautilus
3799 CONFIG_ALPHA_NAUTILUS
3800 Alpha systems based on the AMD 751 & ALI 1543C chipsets.
3802 Noname
3803 CONFIG_ALPHA_NONAME
3804 The AXPpci33 (aka NoName), is based on the EB66 (includes the Multia
3805 UDB). This design was produced by Digital's Technical OEM (TOEM)
3806 group. It uses the 21066 processor running at 166MHz or 233MHz. It
3807 is a baby-AT size, and runs from a standard PC power supply. It has
3808 5 ISA slots and 3 PCI slots (one pair are a shared slot). There are
3809 2 versions, with either PS/2 or large DIN connectors for the
3810 keyboard.
3812 Noritake
3813 CONFIG_ALPHA_NORITAKE
3814 AlphaServer 1000A, AlphaServer 600A, and AlphaServer 800-based
3815 systems.
3817 Rawhide
3818 CONFIG_ALPHA_RAWHIDE
3819 AlphaServer 1200, AlphaServer 4000 and AlphaServer 4100 machines.
3820 See HOWTO at
3821 <http://www.alphalinux.org/docs/rawhide/4100_install.shtml>.
3823 Ruffian
3824 CONFIG_ALPHA_RUFFIAN
3825 Samsung APC164UX. There is a page on known problems and workarounds
3826 at <http://www.alphalinux.org/faq/FAQ-11.html>.
3828 Sable
3829 CONFIG_ALPHA_SABLE
3830 Digital AlphaServer 2000 and 2100-based systems.
3832 Takara
3833 CONFIG_ALPHA_TAKARA
3834 Alpha 11164-based OEM single-board computer.
3836 Wildfire
3837 CONFIG_ALPHA_WILDFIRE
3838 AlphaServer GS 40/80/160/320 SMP based on the EV67 core.
3840 EV5 CPU daughtercard (model 5/xxx)
3841 CONFIG_ALPHA_PRIMO
3842 Say Y if you have an AS 1000 5/xxx or an AS 1000A 5/xxx.
3844 EV5 CPU(s) (model 5/xxx)
3845 CONFIG_ALPHA_GAMMA
3846 Say Y if you have an AS 2000 5/xxx or an AS 2100 5/xxx.
3848 EV67 (or later) CPU (speed > 600MHz)?
3849 CONFIG_ALPHA_EV67
3850 Is this a machine based on the EV67 core? If in doubt, select N here
3851 and the machine will be treated as an EV6.
3853 Use SRM as bootloader
3854 CONFIG_ALPHA_SRM
3855 There are two different types of booting firmware on Alphas: SRM,
3856 which is command line driven, and ARC, which uses menus and arrow
3857 keys. Details about the Linux/Alpha booting process are contained in
3858 the Linux/Alpha FAQ, accessible on the WWW from
3859 <http://www.alphalinux.org/>.
3861 The usual way to load Linux on an Alpha machine is to use MILO
3862 (a bootloader that lets you pass command line parameters to the
3863 kernel just like lilo does for the x86 architecture) which can be
3864 loaded either from ARC or can be installed directly as a permanent
3865 firmware replacement from floppy (which requires changing a certain
3866 jumper on the motherboard). If you want to do either of these, say N
3867 here. If MILO doesn't work on your system (true for Jensen
3868 motherboards), you can bypass it altogether and boot Linux directly
3869 from an SRM console; say Y here in order to do that. Note that you
3870 won't be able to boot from an IDE disk using old versions of SRM.
3872 If unsure, say N.
3874 Legacy kernel start address
3875 CONFIG_ALPHA_LEGACY_START_ADDRESS
3876 The 2.4 kernel changed the kernel start address from 0x310000
3877 to 0x810000 to make room for the Wildfire's larger SRM console.
3879 If you're using aboot 0.7 or later, the bootloader will examine the
3880 ELF headers to determine where to transfer control. Unfortunately,
3881 most older bootloaders -- APB or MILO -- hardcoded the kernel start
3882 address rather than examining the ELF headers, and the result is a
3883 hard lockup.
3885 Say Y if you have a broken bootloader. Say N if you do not, or if
3886 you wish to run on Wildfire.
3888 Large VMALLOC support
3889 CONFIG_ALPHA_LARGE_VMALLOC
3890 Process creation and other aspects of virtual memory management can
3891 be streamlined if we restrict the kernel to one PGD for all vmalloc
3892 allocations. This equates to about 8GB.
3894 Under normal circumstances, this is so far and above what is needed
3895 as to be laughable. However, there are certain applications (such
3896 as benchmark-grade in-kernel web serving) that can make use of as
3897 much vmalloc space as is available.
3899 Say N unless you know you need gobs and gobs of vmalloc space.
3901 Non-standard serial port support
3902 CONFIG_SERIAL_NONSTANDARD
3903 Say Y here if you have any non-standard serial boards -- boards
3904 which aren't supported using the standard "dumb" serial driver.
3905 This includes intelligent serial boards such as Cyclades,
3906 Digiboards, etc. These are usually used for systems that need many
3907 serial ports because they serve many terminals or dial-in
3908 connections.
3910 Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
3911 kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
3912 the questions about non-standard serial boards.
3914 Most people can say N here.
3916 Extended dumb serial driver options
3917 CONFIG_SERIAL_EXTENDED
3918 If you wish to use any non-standard features of the standard "dumb"
3919 driver, say Y here. This includes HUB6 support, shared serial
3920 interrupts, special multiport support, support for more than the
3921 four COM 1/2/3/4 boards, etc.
3923 Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
3924 kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
3925 the questions about serial driver options. If unsure, say N.
3927 Support more than 4 serial ports
3928 CONFIG_SERIAL_MANY_PORTS
3929 Say Y here if you have dumb serial boards other than the four
3930 standard COM 1/2/3/4 ports. This may happen if you have an AST
3931 FourPort, Accent Async, Boca (read the Boca mini-HOWTO, available
3932 from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>), or other custom
3933 serial port hardware which acts similar to standard serial port
3934 hardware. If you only use the standard COM 1/2/3/4 ports, you can
3935 say N here to save some memory. You can also say Y if you have an
3936 "intelligent" multiport card such as Cyclades, Digiboards, etc.
3938 Support for sharing serial interrupts
3939 CONFIG_SERIAL_SHARE_IRQ
3940 Some serial boards have hardware support which allows multiple dumb
3941 serial ports on the same board to share a single IRQ. To enable
3942 support for this in the serial driver, say Y here.
3944 Auto-detect IRQ on standard ports (unsafe)
3945 CONFIG_SERIAL_DETECT_IRQ
3946 Say Y here if you want the kernel to try to guess which IRQ
3947 to use for your serial port.
3949 This is considered unsafe; it is far better to configure the IRQ in
3950 a boot script using the setserial command.
3952 If unsure, say N.
3954 Support special multiport boards
3955 CONFIG_SERIAL_MULTIPORT
3956 Some multiport serial ports have special ports which are used to
3957 signal when there are any serial ports on the board which need
3958 servicing. Say Y here to enable the serial driver to take advantage
3959 of those special I/O ports.
3961 SGI IP22 Zilog85C30 serial support
3962 CONFIG_IP22_SERIAL
3963 If you want to use your IP22's built-in serial ports under Linux,
3964 answer Y.
3966 SGI Newport Console support
3967 CONFIG_SGI_NEWPORT_CONSOLE
3968 Say Y here if you want the console on the Newport aka XL graphics
3969 card of your Indy. Most people say Y here.
3971 SGI DS1286 RTC support
3972 CONFIG_SGI_DS1286
3973 If you say Y here and create a character special file /dev/rtc with
3974 major number 10 and minor number 135 using mknod ("man mknod"), you
3975 will get access to the real time clock built into your computer.
3976 Every SGI has such a clock built in. It reports status information
3977 via the file /proc/rtc and its behaviour is set by various ioctls on
3978 /dev/rtc.
3980 Dallas DS1742 RTC Support
3981 CONFIG_DS1742
3982 If you say Y here and create a character special file /dev/rtc with
3983 major number 10 and minor number 135 using mknod ("man mknod"), you
3984 will get access to the real time clock present on various Toshiba
3985 MIPS-based boards. It reports status information via the file
3986 /proc/driver/rtc and its behaviour is set by various ioctls on
3987 /dev/rtc or /dev/misc/rtc if using devfs.
3989 For technical information and application notes, please see the
3990 Dallas Semiconductor website:
3991 <http://www.dalsemi.com/quick_view2.cfm?qv_pk=2768>.
3993 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
3994 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
3995 The module is called ds1742.o. If you want to compile it as a module,
3996 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
3998 Indy/I2 Hardware Watchdog
3999 CONFIG_INDYDOG
4000 Hardwaredriver for the Indy's/I2's watchdog. This is a
4001 watchdog timer that will reboot the machine after a 60 second
4002 timer expired and no process has written to /dev/watchdog during
4003 that time.
4005 Support the Bell Technologies HUB6 card
4006 CONFIG_HUB6
4007 Say Y here to enable support in the dumb serial driver to support
4008 the HUB6 card.
4010 PCMCIA serial device support
4011 CONFIG_PCMCIA_SERIAL_CS
4012 Say Y here to enable support for 16-bit PCMCIA serial devices,
4013 including serial port cards, modems, and the modem functions of
4014 multi-function Ethernet/modem cards. (PCMCIA- or PC-cards are
4015 credit-card size devices often used with laptops.)
4017 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4018 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4019 The module will be called serial_cs.o. If you want to compile it as
4020 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4021 If unsure, say N.
4023 CONFIG_SYNCLINK_CS
4024 Enable support for the SyncLink PC Card serial adapter, running
4025 asynchronous and HDLC communications up to 512Kbps. The port is
4026 selectable for RS-232, V.35, RS-449, RS-530, and X.21
4028 This driver may be built as a module ( = code which can be
4029 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4030 The module will be called synclinkmp.o. If you want to do that, say M
4031 here.
4033 ACP Modem (Mwave) support
4034 CONFIG_MWAVE
4035 The ACP modem (Mwave) for Linux is a WinModem. It is composed of a
4036 kernel driver and a user level application. Together these components
4037 support direct attachment to public switched telephone networks (PSTNs)
4038 and support selected world wide countries.
4040 This version of the ACP Modem driver supports the IBM Thinkpad 600E,
4041 600, and 770 that include on board ACP modem hardware.
4043 The modem also supports the standard communications port interface
4044 (ttySx) and is compatible with the Hayes AT Command Set.
4046 The user level application needed to use this driver can be found at
4047 the IBM Linux Technology Center (LTC) web site:
4048 <http://www.ibm.com/linux/ltc/>.
4050 If you own one of the above IBM Thinkpads which has the Mwave chipset
4051 in it, say Y.
4053 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4054 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4055 The module will be called mwave.o. If you want to compile it as
4056 a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt.
4058 /dev/agpgart (AGP Support)
4059 CONFIG_AGP
4060 AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) is a bus system mainly used to
4061 connect graphics cards to the rest of the system.
4063 If you have an AGP system and you say Y here, it will be possible to
4064 use the AGP features of your 3D rendering video card. This code acts
4065 as a sort of "AGP driver" for the motherboard's chipset.
4067 If you need more texture memory than you can get with the AGP GART
4068 (theoretically up to 256 MB, but in practice usually 64 or 128 MB
4069 due to kernel allocation issues), you could use PCI accesses
4070 and have up to a couple gigs of texture space.
4072 Note that this is the only means to have XFree4/GLX use
4073 write-combining with MTRR support on the AGP bus. Without it, OpenGL
4074 direct rendering will be a lot slower but still faster than PIO.
4076 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4077 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4079 This driver is available as a module. If you want to compile it as
4080 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The
4081 module will be called agpgart.o.
4083 Intel 440LX/BX/GX/815/820/830/840/845/850/860 support
4084 CONFIG_AGP_INTEL
4085 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
4086 XFree86 4.x on Intel 440LX/BX/GX, 815, 820, 830, 840, 845, 850 and 860 chipsets.
4088 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4089 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4091 Intel 460GX support
4092 CONFIG_AGP_I460
4093 This option gives you AGP support for the Intel 460GX chipset. This
4094 chipset, the first to support Intel Itanium processors, is new and
4095 this option is correspondingly a little experimental.
4097 If you don't have a 460GX based machine (such as BigSur) with an AGP
4098 slot then this option isn't going to do you much good. If you're
4099 dying to do Direct Rendering on IA-64, this is what you're looking for.
4101 Intel I810/I815 DC100/I810e support
4102 CONFIG_AGP_I810
4103 This option gives you AGP support for the Xserver on the Intel 810
4104 815 and 830m chipset boards for their on-board integrated graphics. This
4105 is required to do any useful video modes with these boards.
4107 VIA chipset support
4108 CONFIG_AGP_VIA
4109 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
4110 XFree86 4.x on VIA MPV3/Apollo Pro chipsets.
4112 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4113 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4115 AMD Irongate, 761, and 762 support
4116 CONFIG_AGP_AMD
4117 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
4118 XFree86 4.x on AMD Irongate, 761, and 762 chipsets.
4120 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4121 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4123 CONFIG_AGP_AMD_K8
4124 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of
4125 XFree86 on an AMD Opteron/Athlon64 using the on-CPU GART.
4127 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4128 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4130 Generic SiS support
4131 CONFIG_AGP_SIS
4132 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of
4133 XFree86 4.x on Silicon Integrated Systems [SiS] chipsets.
4135 Note that 5591/5592 AGP chipsets are NOT specifically supported;
4136 However, the driver works well on these, too.
4138 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4139 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4141 Serverworks LE/HE support
4142 CONFIG_AGP_SWORKS
4143 Say Y here to support the Serverworks AGP card. See
4144 <http://www.serverworks.com/> for product descriptions and images.
4146 NVIDIA chipset support
4147 CONFIG_AGP_NVIDIA
4148 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
4149 XFree86 4.x on NVIDIA nForce/nForce2 chipsets.
4151 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4152 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4154 ALI chipset support
4155 CONFIG_AGP_ALI
4156 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
4157 XFree86 4.x on the following ALi chipsets. The supported chipsets
4158 include M1541, M1621, M1631, M1632, M1641,M1647,and M1651.
4159 For the ALi-chipset question, ALi suggests you refer to
4160 <http://www.ali.com.tw/eng/support/index.shtml>.
4162 The M1541 chipset can do AGP 1x and 2x, but note that there is an
4163 acknowledged incompatibility with Matrox G200 cards. Due to
4164 timing issues, this chipset cannot do AGP 2x with the G200.
4165 This is a hardware limitation. AGP 1x seems to be fine, though.
4167 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4168 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4170 CONFIG_AGP_HP_ZX1
4171 This option gives you AGP GART support for the HP ZX1 chipset
4172 for IA64 processors.
4174 CONFIG_AGP_ATI
4175 This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of
4176 XFree86 4.x on the ATI RadeonIGP family of chipsets.
4178 You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
4179 use GLX or DRI. If unsure, say N.
4181 Support for ISA-bus hardware
4182 CONFIG_ISA
4183 Find out whether you have ISA slots on your motherboard. ISA is the
4184 name of a bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff
4185 inside your box. Other bus systems are PCI, EISA, MicroChannel
4186 (MCA) or VESA. ISA is an older system, now being displaced by PCI;
4187 newer boards don't support it. If you have ISA, say Y, otherwise N.
4189 Support for PCI bus hardware
4190 CONFIG_PCI
4191 Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
4192 bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
4193 your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
4194 VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
4196 The PCI-HOWTO, available from
4197 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
4198 information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
4199 doesn't.
4201 PCI support
4202 CONFIG_PCI_INTEGRATOR
4203 Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
4204 bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
4205 your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
4206 VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
4208 The PCI-HOWTO, available from
4209 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
4210 information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
4211 doesn't.
4213 QSpan PCI
4214 CONFIG_PCI_QSPAN
4215 Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
4216 bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
4217 your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
4218 VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
4220 The PCI-HOWTO, available from
4221 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
4222 information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
4223 doesn't.
4225 # Choice: pci_access
4226 PCI access mode
4227 CONFIG_PCI_GOBIOS
4228 On PCI systems, the BIOS can be used to detect the PCI devices and
4229 determine their configuration. However, some old PCI motherboards
4230 have BIOS bugs and may crash if this is done. Also, some embedded
4231 PCI-based systems don't have any BIOS at all. Linux can also try to
4232 detect the PCI hardware directly without using the BIOS.
4234 With this option, you can specify how Linux should detect the PCI
4235 devices. If you choose "BIOS", the BIOS will be used, if you choose
4236 "Direct", the BIOS won't be used, and if you choose "Any", the
4237 kernel will try the direct access method and falls back to the BIOS
4238 if that doesn't work. If unsure, go with the default, which is
4239 "Any".
4241 PCI device name database
4242 CONFIG_PCI_NAMES
4243 By default, the kernel contains a database of all known PCI device
4244 names to make the information in /proc/pci, /proc/ioports and
4245 similar files comprehensible to the user. This database increases
4246 size of the kernel image by about 80KB, but it gets freed after the
4247 system boots up, so it doesn't take up kernel memory. Anyway, if you
4248 are building an installation floppy or kernel for an embedded system
4249 where kernel image size really matters, you can disable this feature
4250 and you'll get device ID numbers instead of names.
4252 When in doubt, say Y.
4254 Generic PCI hotplug support
4255 CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI
4256 Say Y here if you have a motherboard with a PCI Hotplug controller.
4257 This allows you to add and remove PCI cards while the machine is
4258 powered up and running. The file system pcihpfs must be mounted
4259 in order to interact with any PCI Hotplug controllers.
4261 This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4262 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4263 The module will be called pci_hotplug.o. If you want to compile it
4264 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4266 When in doubt, say N.
4268 Compaq PCI Hotplug driver
4269 CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_COMPAQ
4270 Say Y here if you have a motherboard with a Compaq PCI Hotplug
4271 controller.
4273 This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4274 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4275 The module will be called cpqphp.o. If you want to compile it
4276 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4278 When in doubt, say N.
4280 PCI Compaq Hotplug controller NVRAM support
4281 CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_COMPAQ_NVRAM
4282 Say Y here if you have a Compaq server that has a PCI Hotplug
4283 controller. This will allow the PCI Hotplug driver to store the PCI
4284 system configuration options in NVRAM.
4286 When in doubt, say N.
4288 ACPI PCI Hotplug driver
4289 CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_ACPI
4290 Say Y here if you have a system that supports PCI Hotplug using
4291 ACPI.
4293 This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4294 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4295 The module will be called acpiphp.o. If you want to compile it
4296 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4298 MCA support
4299 CONFIG_MCA
4300 MicroChannel Architecture is found in some IBM PS/2 machines and
4301 laptops. It is a bus system similar to PCI or ISA. See
4302 <file:Documentation/mca.txt> (and especially the web page given
4303 there) before attempting to build an MCA bus kernel.
4305 Support for EISA-bus hardware
4306 CONFIG_EISA
4307 The Extended Industry Standard Architecture (EISA) bus was
4308 developed as an open alternative to the IBM MicroChannel bus.
4310 The EISA bus provided some of the features of the IBM MicroChannel
4311 bus while maintaining backward compatibility with cards made for
4312 the older ISA bus. The EISA bus saw limited use between 1988 and
4313 1995 when it was made obsolete by the PCI bus.
4315 Say Y here if you are building a kernel for an EISA-based machine.
4317 Otherwise, say N.
4319 SGI Visual Workstation support
4320 CONFIG_VISWS
4321 The SGI Visual Workstation series is an IA32-based workstation
4322 based on SGI systems chips with some legacy PC hardware attached.
4323 Say Y here to create a kernel to run on the SGI 320 or 540.
4324 A kernel compiled for the Visual Workstation will not run on other
4325 PC boards and vice versa.
4326 See <file:Documentation/sgi-visws.txt> for more.
4328 SGI Visual Workstation framebuffer support
4329 CONFIG_FB_SGIVW
4330 SGI Visual Workstation support for framebuffer graphics.
4332 I2O support
4333 CONFIG_I2O
4334 The Intelligent Input/Output (I2O) architecture allows hardware
4335 drivers to be split into two parts: an operating system specific
4336 module called the OSM and an hardware specific module called the
4337 HDM. The OSM can talk to a whole range of HDM's, and ideally the
4338 HDM's are not OS dependent. This allows for the same HDM driver to
4339 be used under different operating systems if the relevant OSM is in
4340 place. In order for this to work, you need to have an I2O interface
4341 adapter card in your computer. This card contains a special I/O
4342 processor (IOP), thus allowing high speeds since the CPU does not
4343 have to deal with I/O.
4345 If you say Y here, you will get a choice of interface adapter
4346 drivers and OSM's with the following questions.
4348 This support is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4349 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4350 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
4351 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. You will get modules called
4352 i2o_core.o and i2o_config.o.
4354 If unsure, say N.
4356 I2O PCI support
4357 CONFIG_I2O_PCI
4358 Say Y for support of PCI bus I2O interface adapters. Currently this
4359 is the only variety supported, so you should say Y.
4361 This support is also available as a module called i2o_pci.o ( = code
4362 which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
4363 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
4364 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4366 I2O Block OSM
4367 CONFIG_I2O_BLOCK
4368 Include support for the I2O Block OSM. The Block OSM presents disk
4369 and other structured block devices to the operating system.
4371 This support is also available as a module called i2o_block.o ( =
4372 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
4373 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
4374 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4376 I2O LAN OSM
4377 CONFIG_I2O_LAN
4378 Include support for the LAN OSM. You will also need to include
4379 support for token ring or FDDI if you wish to use token ring or FDDI
4380 I2O cards with this driver.
4382 This support is also available as a module called i2o_lan.o ( = code
4383 which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
4384 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
4385 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4387 I2O SCSI OSM
4388 CONFIG_I2O_SCSI
4389 Allows direct SCSI access to SCSI devices on a SCSI or FibreChannel
4390 I2O controller. You can use both the SCSI and Block OSM together if
4391 you wish.
4393 This support is also available as a module called i2o_scsi.o ( =
4394 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
4395 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
4396 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4398 I2O /proc support
4399 CONFIG_I2O_PROC
4400 If you say Y here and to "/proc file system support", you will be
4401 able to read I2O related information from the virtual directory
4402 /proc/i2o.
4404 This support is also available as a module called i2o_proc.o ( =
4405 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
4406 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
4407 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4409 Plug and Play support
4410 CONFIG_PNP
4411 Plug and Play (PnP) is a standard for peripherals which allows those
4412 peripherals to be configured by software, e.g. assign IRQ's or other
4413 parameters. No jumpers on the cards are needed, instead the values
4414 are provided to the cards from the BIOS, from the operating system,
4415 or using a user-space utility.
4417 Say Y here if you would like Linux to configure your Plug and Play
4418 devices. You should then also say Y to "ISA Plug and Play support",
4419 below. Alternatively, you can say N here and configure your PnP
4420 devices using the user space utilities contained in the isapnptools
4421 package.
4423 This support is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4424 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4425 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
4426 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4428 ISA Plug and Play support
4429 CONFIG_ISAPNP
4430 Say Y here if you would like support for ISA Plug and Play devices.
4431 Some information is in <file:Documentation/isapnp.txt>.
4433 This support is also available as a module called isapnp.o ( =
4434 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
4435 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
4436 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4438 If unsure, say Y.
4440 PNPBIOS support
4441 CONFIG_PNPBIOS
4442 Linux uses the PNPBIOS as defined in "Plug and Play BIOS
4443 Specification Version 1.0A May 5, 1994" to autodetect built-in
4444 mainboard resources (e.g. parallel port resources).
4446 Other features (e.g. change resources, ESCD, event notification,
4447 Docking station information, ISAPNP services) are not used.
4449 Note: ACPI is expected to supersede PNPBIOS some day, currently it
4450 co-exists nicely.
4452 See latest pcmcia-cs (stand-alone package) for a nice "lspnp" tools,
4453 or have a look at /proc/bus/pnp.
4455 If unsure, say Y.
4457 Support for hot-pluggable devices
4458 CONFIG_HOTPLUG
4459 Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while
4460 the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many
4461 cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.
4463 One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card
4464 size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are
4465 plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another
4466 example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.
4468 Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent
4469 software (at <http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/>) and install it.
4470 Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy
4471 agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed
4472 to use devices as you hotplug them.
4474 PCMCIA/CardBus support
4475 CONFIG_PCMCIA
4476 Say Y here if you want to attach PCMCIA- or PC-cards to your Linux
4477 computer. These are credit-card size devices such as network cards,
4478 modems or hard drives often used with laptops computers. There are
4479 actually two varieties of these cards: the older 16 bit PCMCIA cards
4480 and the newer 32 bit CardBus cards. If you want to use CardBus
4481 cards, you need to say Y here and also to "CardBus support" below.
4483 To use your PC-cards, you will need supporting software from David
4484 Hinds' pcmcia-cs package (see the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
4485 for location). Please also read the PCMCIA-HOWTO, available from
4486 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
4488 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4489 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4490 When compiled this way, there will be modules called pcmcia_core.o
4491 and ds.o. If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and
4492 read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4494 CardBus card and (Yenta) bridge support
4495 CONFIG_CARDBUS
4496 CardBus is a bus mastering architecture for PC-cards, which allows
4497 for 32 bit PC-cards (the original PCMCIA standard specifies only
4498 a 16 bit wide bus). Many newer PC-cards are actually CardBus cards.
4500 This option enables support for CardBus PC Cards, as well as support
4501 for CardBus host bridges. Virtually all modern PCMCIA bridges are
4502 CardBus compatible. A "bridge" is the hardware inside your computer
4503 that PCMCIA cards are plugged into.
4505 To use your PC-cards, you will need supporting software from David
4506 Hinds' pcmcia-cs package (see the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
4507 for location).
4509 If unsure, say Y.
4511 i82092 compatible bridge support
4512 CONFIG_I82092
4513 This provides support for the Intel I82092AA PCI-to-PCMCIA bridge device,
4514 found in some older laptops and more commonly in evaluation boards for the
4515 chip.
4517 i82365 compatible host bridge support
4518 CONFIG_I82365
4519 Say Y here to include support for ISA-bus PCMCIA host bridges that
4520 are register compatible with the Intel i82365. These are found on
4521 older laptops and ISA-bus card readers for desktop systems. A
4522 "bridge" is the hardware inside your computer that PCMCIA cards are
4523 plugged into. If unsure, say N.
4525 Databook TCIC host bridge support
4526 CONFIG_TCIC
4527 Say Y here to include support for the Databook TCIC family of PCMCIA
4528 host bridges. These are only found on a handful of old systems.
4529 "Bridge" is the name used for the hardware inside your computer that
4530 PCMCIA cards are plugged into. If unsure, say N.
4532 CONFIG_PCMCIA_SIBYTE
4533 Say Y here to include support for the SiByte SOC's built-in PCMCIA
4534 interface. Only ATA cards and CompactFlash are currently
4535 supported.
4537 System V IPC
4538 CONFIG_SYSVIPC
4539 Inter Process Communication is a suite of library functions and
4540 system calls which let processes (running programs) synchronize and
4541 exchange information. It is generally considered to be a good thing,
4542 and some programs won't run unless you say Y here. In particular, if
4543 you want to run the DOS emulator dosemu under Linux (read the
4544 DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from
4545 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>), you'll need to say Y
4546 here.
4548 You can find documentation about IPC with "info ipc" and also in
4549 section 6.4 of the Linux Programmer's Guide, available from
4550 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#guide>.
4552 BSD Process Accounting
4553 CONFIG_BSD_PROCESS_ACCT
4554 If you say Y here, a user level program will be able to instruct the
4555 kernel (via a special system call) to write process accounting
4556 information to a file: whenever a process exits, information about
4557 that process will be appended to the file by the kernel. The
4558 information includes things such as creation time, owning user,
4559 command name, memory usage, controlling terminal etc. (the complete
4560 list is in the struct acct in <file:include/linux/acct.h>). It is
4561 up to the user level program to do useful things with this
4562 information. This is generally a good idea, so say Y.
4564 Sysctl support
4565 CONFIG_SYSCTL
4566 The sysctl interface provides a means of dynamically changing
4567 certain kernel parameters and variables on the fly without requiring
4568 a recompile of the kernel or reboot of the system. The primary
4569 interface consists of a system call, but if you say Y to "/proc
4570 file system support", a tree of modifiable sysctl entries will be
4571 generated beneath the /proc/sys directory. They are explained in the
4572 files in <file:Documentation/sysctl/>. Note that enabling this
4573 option will enlarge the kernel by at least 8 KB.
4575 As it is generally a good thing, you should say Y here unless
4576 building a kernel for install/rescue disks or your system is very
4577 limited in memory.
4579 # Choice: kcore
4580 Kernel core (/proc/kcore) format
4581 CONFIG_KCORE_ELF
4582 If you enabled support for /proc file system then the file
4583 /proc/kcore will contain the kernel core image. This can be used
4584 in gdb:
4586 $ cd /usr/src/linux ; gdb vmlinux /proc/kcore
4588 You have two choices here: ELF and A.OUT. Selecting ELF will make
4589 /proc/kcore appear in ELF core format as defined by the Executable
4590 and Linking Format specification. Selecting A.OUT will choose the
4591 old "a.out" format which may be necessary for some old versions
4592 of binutils or on some architectures.
4594 This is especially useful if you have compiled the kernel with the
4595 "-g" option to preserve debugging information. It is mainly used
4596 for examining kernel data structures on the live kernel so if you
4597 don't understand what this means or are not a kernel hacker, just
4598 leave it at its default value ELF.
4600 Select a.out format for /proc/kcore
4601 CONFIG_KCORE_AOUT
4602 Not necessary unless you're using a very out-of-date binutils
4603 version. You probably want KCORE_ELF.
4605 Kernel support for ELF binaries
4606 CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF
4607 ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and
4608 executables used across different architectures and operating
4609 systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries
4610 and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all
4611 but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC)
4612 because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able
4613 to run executables from different architectures or operating systems
4614 however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new
4615 executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely
4616 want to say Y here.
4618 Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from
4619 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
4621 If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y
4622 here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then
4623 you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including
4624 ld.so (check the file <file:Documentation/Changes> for location and
4625 latest version).
4627 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
4628 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
4629 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
4630 will be called binfmt_elf.o. Saying M or N here is dangerous because
4631 some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.
4633 Kernel support for a.out binaries
4634 CONFIG_BINFMT_AOUT
4635 A.out (Assembler.OUTput) is a set of formats for libraries and
4636 executables used in the earliest versions of UNIX. Linux used the
4637 a.out formats QMAGIC and ZMAGIC until they were replaced with the
4638 ELF format.
4640 As more and more programs are converted to ELF, the use for a.out
4641 will gradually diminish. If you disable this option it will reduce
4642 your kernel by one page. This is not much and by itself does not
4643 warrant removing support. However its removal is a good idea if you
4644 wish to ensure that absolutely none of your programs will use this
4645 older executable format. If you don't know what to answer at this
4646 point then answer Y. If someone told you "You need a kernel with
4647 QMAGIC support" then you'll have to say Y here. You may answer M to
4648 compile a.out support as a module and later load the module when you
4649 want to use a program or library in a.out format. The module will be
4650 called binfmt_aout.o. Saying M or N here is dangerous though,
4651 because some crucial programs on your system might still be in A.OUT
4652 format.
4654 OSF/1 v4 readv/writev compatibility
4655 CONFIG_OSF4_COMPAT
4656 Say Y if you are using OSF/1 binaries (like Netscape and Acrobat)
4657 with v4 shared libraries freely available from Compaq. If you're
4658 going to use shared libraries from Tru64 version 5.0 or later, say N.
4660 Kernel support for Linux/Intel ELF binaries
4661 CONFIG_BINFMT_EM86
4662 Say Y here if you want to be able to execute Linux/Intel ELF
4663 binaries just like native Alpha binaries on your Alpha machine. For
4664 this to work, you need to have the emulator /usr/bin/em86 in place.
4666 You can get the same functionality by saying N here and saying Y to
4667 "Kernel support for MISC binaries".
4669 You may answer M to compile the emulation support as a module and
4670 later load the module when you want to use a Linux/Intel binary. The
4671 module will be called binfmt_em86.o. If unsure, say Y.
4673 Kernel support for SOM binaries
4674 CONFIG_BINFMT_SOM
4675 SOM is a binary executable format inherited from HP/UX. Say Y here
4676 to be able to load and execute SOM binaries directly.
4678 Kernel support for MISC binaries
4679 CONFIG_BINFMT_MISC
4680 If you say Y here, it will be possible to plug wrapper-driven binary
4681 formats into the kernel. You will like this especially when you use
4682 programs that need an interpreter to run like Java, Python or
4683 Emacs-Lisp. It's also useful if you often run DOS executables under
4684 the Linux DOS emulator DOSEMU (read the DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from
4685 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>). Once you have
4686 registered such a binary class with the kernel, you can start one of
4687 those programs simply by typing in its name at a shell prompt; Linux
4688 will automatically feed it to the correct interpreter.
4690 You can do other nice things, too. Read the file
4691 <file:Documentation/binfmt_misc.txt> to learn how to use this
4692 feature, and <file:Documentation/java.txt> for information about how
4693 to include Java support.
4695 You must say Y to "/proc file system support" (CONFIG_PROC_FS) to
4696 use this part of the kernel.
4698 You may say M here for module support and later load the module when
4699 you have use for it; the module is called binfmt_misc.o. If you
4700 don't know what to answer at this point, say Y.
4702 Kernel support for JAVA binaries
4703 CONFIG_BINFMT_JAVA
4704 If you say Y here, the kernel will load and execute Java J-code
4705 binaries directly. Note: this option is obsolete and scheduled for
4706 removal, use CONFIG_BINFMT_MISC instead.
4708 Solaris binary emulation
4709 CONFIG_SOLARIS_EMUL
4710 This is experimental code which will enable you to run (many)
4711 Solaris binaries on your SPARC Linux machine.
4713 This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4714 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4715 The module will be called solaris.o. If you want to compile it as a
4716 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4718 SUN SME environment monitoring
4719 CONFIG_ENVCTRL
4720 Kernel support for temperature and fan monitoring on Sun SME
4721 machines.
4723 This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4724 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
4725 The module will be called envctrl.o. If you want to compile it as a
4726 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4728 # Choice: x86type
4729 Processor family
4730 CONFIG_M386
4731 This is the processor type of your CPU. This information is used for
4732 optimizing purposes. In order to compile a kernel that can run on
4733 all x86 CPU types (albeit not optimally fast), you can specify
4734 "386" here.
4736 The kernel will not necessarily run on earlier architectures than
4737 the one you have chosen, e.g. a Pentium optimized kernel will run on
4738 a PPro, but not necessarily on a i486.
4740 Here are the settings recommended for greatest speed:
4741 - "386" for the AMD/Cyrix/Intel 386DX/DXL/SL/SLC/SX, Cyrix/TI
4742 486DLC/DLC2, UMC 486SX-S and NexGen Nx586. Only "386" kernels
4743 will run on a 386 class machine.
4744 - "486" for the AMD/Cyrix/IBM/Intel 486DX/DX2/DX4 or
4745 SL/SLC/SLC2/SLC3/SX/SX2 and UMC U5D or U5S.
4746 - "586" for generic Pentium CPUs, possibly lacking the TSC
4747 (time stamp counter) register.
4748 - "Pentium-Classic" for the Intel Pentium.
4749 - "Pentium-MMX" for the Intel Pentium MMX.
4750 - "Pentium-Pro" for the Intel Pentium Pro/Celeron/Pentium II.
4751 - "Pentium-III" for the Intel Pentium III
4752 and Celerons based on the Coppermine core.
4753 - "Pentium-4" for the Intel Pentium 4.
4754 - "K6" for the AMD K6, K6-II and K6-III (aka K6-3D).
4755 - "Athlon" for the AMD K7 family (Athlon/Duron/Thunderbird).
4756 - "Elan" for the AMD Elan family (Elan SC400/SC410).
4757 - "Crusoe" for the Transmeta Crusoe series.
4758 - "Winchip-C6" for original IDT Winchip.
4759 - "Winchip-2" for IDT Winchip 2.
4760 - "Winchip-2A" for IDT Winchips with 3dNow! capabilities.
4761 - "CyrixIII" for VIA Cyrix III or VIA C3.
4762 - "VIA C3-2 for VIA C3-2 "Nehemiah" (model 9 and above).
4764 If you don't know what to do, choose "386".
4766 486
4767 CONFIG_M486
4768 Select this for a x486 processor, ether Intel or one of the
4769 compatible processors from AMD, Cyrix, IBM, or Intel. Includes DX,
4770 DX2, and DX4 variants; also SL/SLC/SLC2/SLC3/SX/SX2 and UMC U5D or
4771 U5S.
4773 586/K5/5x86/6x86/6x86MX
4774 CONFIG_M586
4775 Select this for an x586 or x686 processor such as the AMD K5, the
4776 Intel 5x86 or 6x86, or the Intel 6x86MX. This choice does not
4777 assume the RDTSC instruction.
4779 Pentium Classic
4780 CONFIG_M586TSC
4781 Select this for a Pentium Classic processor with the RDTSC (Read
4782 Time Stamp Counter) instruction for benchmarking.
4784 VIA C3-2 (Nehemiah)
4785 CONFIG_MVIAC3_2
4786 Select this for a VIA C3 "Nehemiah". Selecting this enables usage of SSE
4787 and tells gcc to treat the CPU as a 686.
4789 Note, this kernel will not boot on older (pre model 9) C3s.
4791 32-bit PDC
4792 CONFIG_PDC_NARROW
4793 Saying Y here will allow developers with a C180, C200, C240, C360,
4794 J200, J210, and/or a J2240 to test 64-bit kernels by providing a
4795 wrapper for the 32-bit PDC calls. Since the machines which require
4796 this option do not support over 4G of RAM, this option is targeted
4797 for developers of these machines wishing to test changes on both
4798 32-bit and 64-bit configurations.
4800 If unsure, say N.
4802 VGA text console
4803 CONFIG_VGA_CONSOLE
4804 Saying Y here will allow you to use Linux in text mode through a
4805 display that complies with the generic VGA standard. Virtually
4806 everyone wants that.
4808 The program SVGATextMode can be used to utilize SVGA video cards to
4809 their full potential in text mode. Download it from
4810 <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/utils/console/>.
4812 Say Y.
4814 Distribute interrupts on all CPUs by default
4815 CONFIG_IRQ_ALL_CPUS
4816 This option gives the kernel permission to distribute IRQs across
4817 multiple CPUs. Saying N here will route all IRQs to the first
4818 CPU. Generally SMP PowerMacs can answer Y. SMP IBM CHRP boxes or
4819 Power3 boxes should say N for now.
4821 Video mode selection support
4822 CONFIG_VIDEO_SELECT
4823 This enables support for text mode selection on kernel startup. If
4824 you want to take advantage of some high-resolution text mode your
4825 card's BIOS offers, but the traditional Linux utilities like
4826 SVGATextMode don't, you can say Y here and set the mode using the
4827 "vga=" option from your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) or set
4828 "vga=ask" which brings up a video mode menu on kernel startup. (Try
4829 "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader about
4830 how to pass options to the kernel.)
4832 Read the file <file:Documentation/svga.txt> for more information
4833 about the Video mode selection support. If unsure, say N.
4835 Support for frame buffer devices
4836 CONFIG_FB
4837 The frame buffer device provides an abstraction for the graphics
4838 hardware. It represents the frame buffer of some video hardware and
4839 allows application software to access the graphics hardware through
4840 a well-defined interface, so the software doesn't need to know
4841 anything about the low-level (hardware register) stuff.
4843 Frame buffer devices work identically across the different
4844 architectures supported by Linux and make the implementation of
4845 application programs easier and more portable; at this point, an X
4846 server exists which uses the frame buffer device exclusively.
4847 On several non-X86 architectures, the frame buffer device is the
4848 only way to use the graphics hardware.
4850 The device is accessed through special device nodes, usually located
4851 in the /dev directory, i.e. /dev/fb*.
4853 You need an utility program called fbset to make full use of frame
4854 buffer devices. Please read <file:Documentation/fb/framebuffer.txt>
4855 and the Framebuffer-HOWTO at
4856 <http://www.tahallah.demon.co.uk/programming/prog.html> for more
4857 information.
4859 Say Y here and to the driver for your graphics board below if you
4860 are compiling a kernel for a non-x86 architecture.
4862 If you are compiling for the x86 architecture, you can say Y if you
4863 want to play with it, but it is not essential. Please note that
4864 running graphical applications that directly touch the hardware
4865 (e.g. an accelerated X server) and that are not frame buffer
4866 device-aware may cause unexpected results. If unsure, say N.
4868 Acorn VIDC support
4869 CONFIG_FB_ACORN
4870 This is the frame buffer device driver for the Acorn VIDC graphics
4871 hardware found in Acorn RISC PCs and other ARM-based machines. If
4872 unsure, say N.
4874 Permedia2 support
4875 CONFIG_FB_PM2
4876 This is the frame buffer device driver for the Permedia2 AGP frame
4877 buffer card from ASK, aka `Graphic Blaster Exxtreme'. There is a
4878 product page at
4879 <http://www.ask.com.hk/product/Permedia%202/permedia2.htm>.
4881 Enable FIFO disconnect feature
4882 CONFIG_FB_PM2_FIFO_DISCONNECT
4883 Support the Permedia2 FIFOI disconnect feature (see CONFIG_FB_PM2).
4885 Generic Permedia2 PCI board support
4886 CONFIG_FB_PM2_PCI
4887 Say Y to enable support for Permedia2 AGP frame buffer card from
4888 3Dlabs (aka `Graphic Blaster Exxtreme') on the PCI bus.
4890 Phase5 CVisionPPC/BVisionPPC support
4891 CONFIG_FB_PM2_CVPPC
4892 Say Y to enable support for the Amiga Phase 5 CVisionPPC BVisionPPC
4893 framebuffer cards. Phase 5 is no longer with us, alas.
4895 Amiga native chipset support
4896 CONFIG_FB_AMIGA
4897 This is the frame buffer device driver for the builtin graphics
4898 chipset found in Amigas.
4900 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
4901 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
4902 module will be called amifb.o. If you want to compile it as a
4903 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
4905 Amiga OCS chipset support
4906 CONFIG_FB_AMIGA_OCS
4907 This enables support for the original Agnus and Denise video chips,
4908 found in the Amiga 1000 and most A500's and A2000's. If you intend
4909 to run Linux on any of these systems, say Y; otherwise say N.
4911 Amiga ECS chipset support
4912 CONFIG_FB_AMIGA_ECS
4913 This enables support for the Enhanced Chip Set, found in later
4914 A500's, later A2000's, the A600, the A3000, the A3000T and CDTV. If
4915 you intend to run Linux on any of these systems, say Y; otherwise
4916 say N.
4918 Amiga AGA chipset support
4919 CONFIG_FB_AMIGA_AGA
4920 This enables support for the Advanced Graphics Architecture (also
4921 known as the AGA or AA) Chip Set, found in the A1200, A4000, A4000T
4922 and CD32. If you intend to run Linux on any of these systems, say Y;
4923 otherwise say N.
4925 Amiga CyberVision support
4926 CONFIG_FB_CYBER
4927 This enables support for the Cybervision 64 graphics card from
4928 Phase5. Please note that its use is not all that intuitive (i.e. if
4929 you have any questions, be sure to ask!). Say N unless you have a
4930 Cybervision 64 or plan to get one before you next recompile the
4931 kernel. Please note that this driver DOES NOT support the
4932 Cybervision 64 3D card, as they use incompatible video chips.
4934 CyberPro 20x0 support
4935 CONFIG_FB_CYBER2000
4936 This enables support for the Integraphics CyberPro 20x0 and 5000
4937 VGA chips used in the Rebel.com Netwinder and other machines.
4938 Say Y if you have a NetWinder or a graphics card containing this
4939 device, otherwise say N.
4941 Amiga CyberVision3D support
4942 CONFIG_FB_VIRGE
4943 This enables support for the Cybervision 64/3D graphics card from
4944 Phase5. Please note that its use is not all that intuitive (i.e. if
4945 you have any questions, be sure to ask!). Say N unless you have a
4946 Cybervision 64/3D or plan to get one before you next recompile the
4947 kernel. Please note that this driver DOES NOT support the older
4948 Cybervision 64 card, as they use incompatible video chips.
4950 Amiga RetinaZ3 support
4951 CONFIG_FB_RETINAZ3
4952 This enables support for the Retina Z3 graphics card. Say N unless
4953 you have a Retina Z3 or plan to get one before you next recompile
4954 the kernel.
4956 Cirrus Logic generic driver
4957 CONFIG_FB_CLGEN
4958 This enables support for Cirrus Logic GD542x/543x based boards on
4959 Amiga: SD64, Piccolo, Picasso II/II+, Picasso IV, or EGS Spectrum.
4961 If you have a PCI-based system, this enables support for these
4962 chips: GD-543x, GD-544x, GD-5480.
4964 Please read the file <file:Documentation/fb/clgenfb.txt>.
4966 Say N unless you have such a graphics board or plan to get one
4967 before you next recompile the kernel.
4969 Apollo support
4970 CONFIG_APOLLO
4971 Say Y here if you want to run Linux on an MC680x0-based Apollo
4972 Domain workstation such as the DN3500.
4974 Apollo 3c505 "EtherLink Plus" support
4975 CONFIG_APOLLO_ELPLUS
4976 Say Y or M here if your Apollo has a 3Com 3c505 ISA Ethernet card.
4977 If you don't have one made for Apollos, you can use one from a PC,
4978 except that your Apollo won't be able to boot from it (because the
4979 code in the ROM will be for a PC).
4981 Atari native chipset support
4982 CONFIG_FB_ATARI
4983 This is the frame buffer device driver for the builtin graphics
4984 chipset found in Ataris.
4986 Amiga FrameMaster II/Rainbow II support
4987 CONFIG_FB_FM2
4988 This is the frame buffer device driver for the Amiga FrameMaster
4989 card from BSC (exhibited 1992 but not shipped as a CBM product).
4991 Open Firmware frame buffer device support
4992 CONFIG_FB_OF
4993 Say Y if you want support with Open Firmware for your graphics
4994 board.
4996 S3 Trio frame buffer device support
4997 CONFIG_FB_S3TRIO
4998 If you have a S3 Trio say Y. Say N for S3 Virge.
5000 3Dfx Banshee/Voodoo3 display support
5001 CONFIG_FB_3DFX
5002 This driver supports graphics boards with the 3Dfx Banshee/Voodoo3
5003 chips. Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
5005 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5006 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5007 module will be called tdfxfb.o. If you want to compile it as a
5008 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5010 nVidia Riva support
5011 CONFIG_FB_RIVA
5012 This driver supports graphics boards with the nVidia Riva/Geforce
5013 chips.
5014 Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
5016 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5017 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5018 module will be called rivafb.o. If you want to compile it as a
5019 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5021 Trident Blade/Image support
5022 CONFIG_FB_TRIDENT
5023 This driver is supposed to support graphics boards with the
5024 Trident CyberXXXX/Image/CyberBlade chips mostly found in laptops
5025 but also on some motherboards.Read <file:Documentation/fb/tridentfb.txt>
5027 Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
5029 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5030 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5031 module will be called tridentfb.o. If you want to compile it as a
5032 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5034 ATI Mach64 display support
5035 CONFIG_FB_ATY
5036 This driver supports graphics boards with the ATI Mach64 chips.
5037 Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
5039 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5040 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5041 module will be called atyfb.o. If you want to compile it as a
5042 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5044 ATI Rage128 display support
5045 CONFIG_FB_ATY128
5046 This driver supports graphics boards with the ATI Rage128 chips.
5047 Say Y if you have such a graphics board and read
5048 <file:Documentation/fb/aty128fb.txt>.
5050 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5051 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5052 module will be called aty128fb.o. If you want to compile it as a
5053 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5055 Maxine (Personal DECstation) onboard framebuffer support
5056 CONFIG_FB_MAXINE
5057 Support for the onboard framebuffer (1024x768x8) in the Personal
5058 DECstation series (Personal DECstation 5000/20, /25, /33, /50,
5059 Codename "Maxine").
5061 PMAG-AA TURBOchannel framebuffer support
5062 CONFIG_FB_PMAG_AA
5063 Support for the PMAG-AA TURBOchannel framebuffer card (1280x1024x1)
5064 used mainly in the MIPS-based DECstation series.
5066 PMAG-BA TURBOchannel framebuffer support
5067 CONFIG_FB_PMAG_BA
5068 Support for the PMAG-BA TURBOchannel framebuffer card (1024x864x8)
5069 used mainly in the MIPS-based DECstation series.
5071 PMAGB-B TURBOchannel framebuffer support
5072 CONFIG_FB_PMAGB_B
5073 Support for the PMAGB-B TURBOchannel framebuffer card used mainly
5074 in the MIPS-based DECstation series. The card is currently only
5075 supported in 1280x1024x8 mode.
5077 FutureTV PCI card
5078 CONFIG_ARCH_FTVPCI
5079 Say Y here if you intend to run this kernel on a FutureTV (nee Nexus
5080 Electronics) StrongARM PCI card.
5082 ANAKIN Vehicle Telematics Platform
5083 CONFIG_ARCH_ANAKIN
5084 The Anakin is a StrongArm based SA110 - 2 DIN Vehicle Telematics Platform.
5085 64MB SDRAM - 4 Mb Flash - Compact Flash Interface - 1 MB VRAM
5087 On board peripherals:
5088 * Front display: 400x234 16 bit TFT touchscreen
5089 * External independent second screen interface
5090 * CAN controller SJA1000
5091 * USB host controller
5092 * 6 channel video codec with hardware overlay
5093 * Smartcard reader
5094 * IrDa
5096 Modules interfaced over the Multi Media Extension slots:
5097 * A communication card
5098 Wavecom GPRS modem
5099 uBlock GPS
5100 Bosch DAB module
5101 * An audio card ( 4 * 40W, AC97 Codec, I2S)
5103 Altera Excalibur XA10 Dev Board
5104 ARCH_CAMELOT
5105 This enables support for Altera's Excalibur XA10 development board.
5106 If you would like to build your kernel to run on one of these boards
5107 then you must say 'Y' here. Otherwise say 'N'
5109 Link-Up Systems LCD support
5110 CONFIG_FB_L7200
5111 This driver supports the L7200 Color LCD.
5112 Say Y if you want graphics support.
5114 NeoMagic display support (EXPERIMENTAL)
5115 CONFIG_FB_NEOMAGIC
5116 This driver supports notebooks with NeoMagic PCI chips.
5117 Say Y if you have such a graphics card.
5119 The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5120 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5121 module will be called neofb.o. If you want to compile it as a
5122 module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt.
5124 PowerMac "control" frame buffer device support
5125 CONFIG_FB_CONTROL
5126 This driver supports a frame buffer for the graphics adapter in the
5127 Power Macintosh 7300 and others.
5129 PowerMac "platinum" frame buffer device support
5130 CONFIG_FB_PLATINUM
5131 This driver supports a frame buffer for the "platinum" graphics
5132 adapter in some Power Macintoshes.
5134 PowerMac "valkyrie" frame buffer device support
5135 CONFIG_FB_VALKYRIE
5136 This driver supports a frame buffer for the "valkyrie" graphics
5137 adapter in some Power Macintoshes.
5139 Chips 65550 display support
5140 CONFIG_FB_CT65550
5141 This is the frame buffer device driver for the Chips & Technologies
5142 65550 graphics chip in PowerBooks.
5144 TGA frame buffer support
5145 CONFIG_FB_TGA
5146 This is the frame buffer device driver for generic TGA graphic
5147 cards. Say Y if you have one of those.
5149 VESA VGA graphics console
5150 CONFIG_FB_VESA
5151 This is the frame buffer device driver for generic VESA 2.0
5152 compliant graphic cards. The older VESA 1.2 cards are not supported.
5153 You will get a boot time penguin logo at no additional cost. Please
5154 read <file:Documentation/fb/vesafb.txt>. If unsure, say Y.
5156 VGA 16-color planar support
5157 CONFIG_FBCON_VGA_PLANES
5158 This low level frame buffer console driver enable the kernel to use
5159 the 16-color planar modes of the old VGA cards where the bits of
5160 each pixel are separated into 4 planes.
5162 Only answer Y here if you have a (very old) VGA card that isn't VESA
5163 2 compatible.
5165 VGA 16-color graphics console
5166 CONFIG_FB_VGA16
5167 This is the frame buffer device driver for VGA 16 color graphic
5168 cards. Say Y if you have such a card.
5170 This code is also available as a module. If you want to compile it
5171 as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the
5172 running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read
5173 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
5174 vga16fb.o.
5176 Generic STI frame buffer device support
5177 CONFIG_FB_STI
5178 STI refers to the HP "Standard Text Interface" which is a set of
5179 BIOS routines contained in a ROM chip in HP PA-RISC based machines.
5180 Enabling this option will implement the linux framebuffer device and
5181 an fbcon color text console using calls to the STI BIOS routines.
5182 The HP framebuffer device is sometimes planar, using a strange memory
5183 layout, and changing the plane mask to create colored pixels
5184 can require a call to the STI routines, so /dev/fb may not actually
5185 be useful. However, on some systems packed pixel formats are supported.
5186 It is sufficient for basic text console functions, including fonts.
5188 You should probably enable this option, unless you are having
5189 trouble getting video when booting the kernel (make sure it isn't
5190 just that you are running the console on the serial port, though).
5191 Really old HP boxes may not have STI, and must use the PDC BIOS
5192 console or the IODC BIOS.
5194 Select other compiled-in fonts
5195 CONFIG_FBCON_FONTS
5196 Say Y here if you would like to use fonts other than the default
5197 your frame buffer console usually use.
5199 Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
5200 kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
5201 the questions about foreign fonts.
5203 If unsure, say N (the default choices are safe).
5205 VGA 8x16 font
5206 CONFIG_FONT_8x16
5207 This is the "high resolution" font for the VGA frame buffer (the one
5208 provided by the VGA text console 80x25 mode.
5210 If unsure, say Y.
5212 Support only 8 pixels wide fonts
5213 CONFIG_FBCON_FONTWIDTH8_ONLY
5214 Answer Y here will make the kernel provide only the 8x8 fonts (these
5215 are the less readable).
5217 If unsure, say N.
5219 Sparc console 8x16 font
5220 CONFIG_FONT_SUN8x16
5221 This is the high resolution console font for Sun machines. Say Y.
5223 Sparc console 12x22 font (not supported by all drivers)
5224 CONFIG_FONT_SUN12x22
5225 This is the high resolution console font for Sun machines with very
5226 big letters (like the letters used in the SPARC PROM). If the
5227 standard font is unreadable for you, say Y, otherwise say N.
5229 VGA 8x8 font
5230 CONFIG_FONT_8x8
5231 This is the "high resolution" font for the VGA frame buffer (the one
5232 provided by the text console 80x50 (and higher) modes).
5234 Note that this is a poor quality font. The VGA 8x16 font is quite a
5235 lot more readable.
5237 Given the resolution provided by the frame buffer device, answer N
5238 here is safe.
5240 Mac console 6x11 font (not supported by all drivers)
5241 CONFIG_FONT_6x11
5242 Small console font with Macintosh-style high-half glyphs. Some Mac
5243 framebuffer drivers don't support this one at all.
5245 Pearl (old m68k) console 8x8 font
5246 CONFIG_FONT_PEARL_8x8
5247 Small console font with PC-style control-character and high-half
5248 glyphs.
5250 Acorn console 8x8 font
5251 CONFIG_FONT_ACORN_8x8
5252 Small console font with PC-style control characters and high-half
5253 glyphs.
5255 Backward compatibility mode for Xpmac
5256 CONFIG_FB_COMPAT_XPMAC
5257 If you use the Xpmac X server (common with mklinux), you'll need to
5258 say Y here to use X. You should consider changing to XFree86 which
5259 includes a server that supports the frame buffer device directly
5260 (XF68_FBDev).
5262 Hercules (HGA) mono graphics support
5263 CONFIG_FB_HGA
5264 Say Y here if you have a Hercules mono graphics card.
5266 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5267 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
5268 The module will be called hgafb.o. If you want to compile it as
5269 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5271 As this card technology is 15 years old, most people will answer N
5272 here.
5274 Epson 1355 framebuffer support
5275 CONFIG_FB_E1355
5276 Build in support for the SED1355 Epson Research Embedded RAMDAC
5277 LCD/CRT Controller (since redesignated as the S1D13505) as a
5278 framebuffer. Product specs at
5279 <http://www.erd.epson.com/vdc/html/products.htm>.
5281 Dreamcast Frame Buffer support
5282 CONFIG_FB_DC
5283 Say Y here to enable support for the framebuffer on the Sega
5284 Dreamcast. This driver is also available as a module, dcfb.o.
5286 Register Base Address
5287 CONFIG_E1355_REG_BASE
5288 Epson SED1355/S1D13505 LCD/CRT controller register base address.
5289 See the manuals at
5290 <http://www.erd.epson.com/vdc/html/contents/S1D13505.htm> for
5291 discussion.
5293 Framebuffer Base Address
5294 CONFIG_E1355_FB_BASE
5295 Epson SED1355/S1D13505 LCD/CRT controller memory base address. See
5296 the manuals at
5297 <http://www.erd.epson.com/vdc/html/contents/S1D13505.htm> for
5298 discussion.
5300 NEC PowerVR 2 display support
5301 CONFIG_FB_PVR2
5302 Say Y here if you have a PowerVR 2 card in your box. If you plan to
5303 run linux on your Dreamcast, you will have to say Y here.
5304 This driver may or may not work on other PowerVR 2 cards, but is
5305 totally untested. Use at your own risk. If unsure, say N.
5307 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5308 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
5309 The module will be called pvr2fb.o. If you want to compile it as
5310 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5312 You can pass several parameters to the driver at boot time or at
5313 module load time. The parameters look like "video=pvr2:XXX", where
5314 the meaning of XXX can be found at the end of the main source file
5315 (<file:drivers/video/pvr2fb.c>). Please see the file
5316 <file:Documentation/fb/pvr2fb.txt>.
5318 Debug pvr2fb
5319 CONFIG_FB_PVR2_DEBUG
5320 Say Y here if you wish for the pvr2fb driver to print out debugging
5321 messages. Most people will want to say N here. If unsure, you will
5322 also want to say N.
5324 Matrox unified accelerated driver
5325 CONFIG_FB_MATROX
5326 Say Y here if you have a Matrox Millennium, Millennium II, Mystique,
5327 Mystique 220, Productiva G100, Mystique G200, Millennium G200,
5328 Matrox G400, G450 or G550 card in your box. At this time, support for
5329 the G-series digital output is almost non-existant.
5331 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5332 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
5333 The module will be called matroxfb.o. If you want to compile it as
5334 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5336 You can pass several parameters to the driver at boot time or at
5337 module load time. The parameters look like "video=matrox:XXX", and
5338 are described in <file:Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt>.
5340 Matrox Millennium I/II support
5341 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MILLENIUM
5342 Say Y here if you have a Matrox Millennium or Matrox Millennium II
5343 video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options" below,
5344 you should check 4 bpp packed pixel, 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp
5345 packed pixel, 24 bpp packed pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can
5346 also use font widths different from 8.
5348 Matrox Mystique support
5349 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MYSTIQUE
5350 Say Y here if you have a Matrox Mystique or Matrox Mystique 220
5351 video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options" below,
5352 you should check 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp packed pixel, 24 bpp
5353 packed pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can also use font widths
5354 different from 8.
5356 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_G450
5357 Say Y here if you have a Matrox G100, G200, G400, G450 or G550 based
5358 video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options", you
5359 should check 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp packed pixel, 24 bpp packed
5360 pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can also use font widths
5361 different from 8.
5363 If you need support for G400 secondary head, you must first say Y to
5364 "I2C support" and "I2C bit-banging support" in the character devices
5365 section, and then to "Matrox I2C support" and "G400 second head
5366 support" here in the framebuffer section. G450/G550 secondary head
5367 and digital output are supported without additional modules.
5369 The driver starts in monitor mode. You must use the matroxset tool
5370 (available at <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/matrox-latest/>) to
5371 swap primary and secondary head outputs, or to change output mode.
5372 Secondary head driver always start in 640x480 resolution and you
5373 must use fbset to change it.
5375 Do not forget that second head supports only 16 and 32 bpp
5376 packed pixels, so it is a good idea to compile them into the kernel
5377 too. You can use only some font widths, as the driver uses generic
5378 painting procedures (the secondary head does not use acceleration
5379 engine).
5381 G450/G550 hardware can display TV picture only from secondary CRTC,
5382 and it performs no scaling, so picture must have 525 or 625 lines.
5384 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_G100A
5385 Say Y here if you have a Matrox G100, G200 or G400 based
5386 video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options", you
5387 should check 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp packed pixel, 24 bpp packed
5388 pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can also use font widths
5389 different from 8.
5391 If you need support for G400 secondary head, you must first say Y to
5392 "I2C support" and "I2C bit-banging support" in the character devices
5393 section, and then to "Matrox I2C support" and "G400 second head
5394 support" here in the framebuffer section.
5396 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_I2C
5397 This drivers creates I2C buses which are needed for accessing the
5398 DDC (I2C) bus present on all Matroxes, an I2C bus which
5399 interconnects Matrox optional devices, like MGA-TVO on G200 and
5400 G400, and the secondary head DDC bus, present on G400 only.
5402 You can say Y or M here if you want to experiment with monitor
5403 detection code. You must say Y or M here if you want to use either
5404 second head of G400 or MGA-TVO on G200 or G400.
5406 If you compile it as module, it will create a module named
5407 i2c-matroxfb.o.
5409 Matrox G400 second head support
5410 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MAVEN
5411 WARNING !!! This support does not work with G450 !!!
5413 Say Y or M here if you want to use a secondary head (meaning two
5414 monitors in parallel) on G400 or MGA-TVO add-on on G200. Secondary
5415 head is not compatible with accelerated XFree 3.3.x SVGA servers -
5416 secondary head output is blanked while you are in X. With XFree
5417 3.9.17 preview you can use both heads if you use SVGA over fbdev or
5418 the fbdev driver on first head and the fbdev driver on second head.
5420 If you compile it as module, two modules are created,
5421 matroxfb_crtc2.o and matroxfb_maven.o. Matroxfb_maven is needed for
5422 both G200 and G400, matroxfb_crtc2 is needed only by G400. You must
5423 also load i2c-matroxfb to get it to run.
5425 The driver starts in monitor mode and you must use the matroxset
5426 tool (available at
5427 <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/matrox-latest/>) to switch it to
5428 PAL or NTSC or to swap primary and secondary head outputs.
5429 Secondary head driver also always start in 640x480 resolution, you
5430 must use fbset to change it.
5432 Also do not forget that second head supports only 16 and 32 bpp
5433 packed pixels, so it is a good idea to compile them into the kernel
5434 too. You can use only some font widths, as the driver uses generic
5435 painting procedures (the secondary head does not use acceleration
5436 engine).
5438 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_PROC
5439 Say Y or M here if you want to access some informations about driver
5440 state through /proc interface.
5442 You should download matrox_pins tool (available at
5443 <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/matrox-latest/>) to get human
5444 readable output.
5446 CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MULTIHEAD
5447 Say Y here if you have more than one (supported) Matrox device in
5448 your computer and you want to use all of them for different monitors
5449 ("multihead"). If you have only one device, you should say N because
5450 the driver compiled with Y is larger and a bit slower, especially on
5451 ia32 (ix86).
5453 If you said M to "Matrox unified accelerated driver" and N here, you
5454 will still be able to use several Matrox devices simultaneously:
5455 insert several instances of the module matroxfb.o into the kernel
5456 with insmod, supplying the parameter "dev=N" where N is 0, 1, etc.
5457 for the different Matrox devices. This method is slightly faster but
5458 uses 40 KB of kernel memory per Matrox card.
5460 There is no need for enabling 'Matrox multihead support' if you have
5461 only one Matrox card in the box.
5463 3Dfx Voodoo Graphics / Voodoo2 frame buffer support
5464 CONFIG_FB_VOODOO1
5465 Say Y here if you have a 3Dfx Voodoo Graphics (Voodoo1/sst1) or
5466 Voodoo2 (cvg) based graphics card.
5468 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5469 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
5470 The module will be called sstfb.o. If you want to compile it as
5471 a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt.
5473 WARNING: Do not use any application that uses the 3D engine
5474 (namely glide) while using this driver.
5475 Please read the file Documentation/fb/README-sstfb.txt for supported
5476 options and other important info support.
5478 MDA text console (dual-headed)
5479 CONFIG_MDA_CONSOLE
5480 Say Y here if you have an old MDA or monochrome Hercules graphics
5481 adapter in your system acting as a second head ( = video card). You
5482 will then be able to use two monitors with your Linux system. Do not
5483 say Y here if your MDA card is the primary card in your system; the
5484 normal VGA driver will handle it.
5486 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5487 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
5488 The module will be called mdacon.o. If you want to compile it as
5489 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5491 If unsure, say N.
5493 SBUS and UPA framebuffers
5494 CONFIG_FB_SBUS
5495 Say Y if you want support for SBUS or UPA based frame buffer device.
5497 Creator/Creator3D support
5498 CONFIG_FB_CREATOR
5499 This is the frame buffer device driver for the Creator and Creator3D
5500 graphics boards.
5502 CGsix (GX,TurboGX) support
5503 CONFIG_FB_CGSIX
5504 This is the frame buffer device driver for the CGsix (GX, TurboGX)
5505 frame buffer.
5507 BWtwo support
5508 CONFIG_FB_BWTWO
5509 This is the frame buffer device driver for the BWtwo frame buffer.
5511 CGthree support
5512 CONFIG_FB_CGTHREE
5513 This is the frame buffer device driver for the CGthree frame buffer.
5515 CGfourteen (SX) support
5516 CONFIG_FB_CGFOURTEEN
5517 This is the frame buffer device driver for the CGfourteen frame
5518 buffer on Desktop SPARCsystems with the SX graphics option.
5520 P9100 (Sparcbook 3 only) support
5521 CONFIG_FB_P9100
5522 This is the frame buffer device driver for the P9100 card
5523 supported on Sparcbook 3 machines.
5525 Leo (ZX) support
5526 CONFIG_FB_LEO
5527 This is the frame buffer device driver for the SBUS-based Sun ZX
5528 (leo) frame buffer cards.
5530 IGA 168x display support
5531 CONFIG_FB_IGA
5532 This is the framebuffer device for the INTERGRAPHICS 1680 and
5533 successor frame buffer cards.
5535 TCX (SS4/SS5 only) support
5536 CONFIG_FB_TCX
5537 This is the frame buffer device driver for the TCX 24/8bit frame
5538 buffer.
5540 HD64461 Frame Buffer support
5541 CONFIG_FB_HIT
5542 This is the frame buffer device driver for the Hitachi HD64461 LCD
5543 frame buffer card.
5545 SIS display support
5546 CONFIG_FB_SIS
5547 This is the frame buffer device driver for the SiS 300, 315 and 330
5548 series chipsets. Documentation available at the maintainer's site
5549 at <http://www.winischhofer.net/linuxsisvga.shtml>.
5551 SIS 300 series support
5552 CONFIG_FB_SIS_300
5553 This enables support for SiS 300 series chipsets (300/305, 540, 630,
5554 730). Documentation available at the maintainer's website at
5555 <http://www.winischhofer.net/linuxsisvga.shtml>.
5557 SIS 315/330 series support
5558 CONFIG_FB_SIS_315
5559 This enables support for SiS 315/330 series chipsets (315, 550, 650,
5560 M650, 651, 661FX, M661FX, 740, 741, 330). Documentation available at
5561 the maintainer's site <http://www.winischhofer.net/linuxsisvga.shtml>.
5563 IMS Twin Turbo display support
5564 CONFIG_FB_IMSTT
5565 The IMS Twin Turbo is a PCI-based frame buffer card bundled with
5566 many Macintosh and compatible computers.
5568 CONFIG_FB_TX3912
5569 The TX3912 is a Toshiba RISC processor based on the MIPS 3900 core;
5570 see <http://www.toshiba.com/taec/components/Generic/risc/tx3912.htm>.
5572 Say Y here to enable kernel support for the on-board framebuffer.
5574 Virtual Frame Buffer support (ONLY FOR TESTING!)
5575 CONFIG_FB_VIRTUAL
5576 This is a `virtual' frame buffer device. It operates on a chunk of
5577 unswappable kernel memory instead of on the memory of a graphics
5578 board. This means you cannot see any output sent to this frame
5579 buffer device, while it does consume precious memory. The main use
5580 of this frame buffer device is testing and debugging the frame
5581 buffer subsystem. Do NOT enable it for normal systems! To protect
5582 the innocent, it has to be enabled explicitly at boot time using the
5583 kernel option `video=vfb:'.
5585 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5586 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
5587 module will be called vfb.o. If you want to compile it as a module,
5588 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5590 If unsure, say N.
5592 Mach64 CT/VT/GT/LT (incl. 3D RAGE) support
5593 CONFIG_FB_ATY_CT
5594 Say Y here to support use of ATI's 64-bit Rage boards (or other
5595 boards based on the Mach64 CT, VT, GT, and LT chipsets) as a
5596 framebuffer device. The ATI product support page for these boards
5597 is at <http://support.ati.com/products/pc/mach64/>.
5599 Sony Vaio Picturebook laptop LCD panel support
5600 CONFIG_FB_ATY_CT_VAIO_LCD
5601 Say Y here if you want to use the full width of the Sony Vaio
5602 Picturebook laptops LCD panels (you will get a 128x30 console).
5604 Note that you need to activate this mode using the 'vga=0x301'
5605 option from your boot loader (lilo or loadlin). See the
5606 documentation of your boot loader about how to pass options to the
5607 kernel.
5609 Mach64 GX support
5610 CONFIG_FB_ATY_GX
5611 Say Y here to support use of the ATI Mach64 Graphics Expression
5612 board (or other boards based on the Mach64 GX chipset) as a
5613 framebuffer device. The ATI product support page for these boards
5614 is at
5615 <http://support.ati.com/products/pc/mach64/graphics_xpression.html>.
5617 Mach64 Generic LCD support
5618 CONFIG_FB_ATY_GENERIC_LCD
5619 Enabling this option enables the Atyfb driver to drive LCD panels. It
5620 will autodetect the resulution and format of your display and emulate
5621 other resolutions using the hardware stretcher on the chip.
5622 Say Y here if you have computer with a Rage LT Pro, Rage Mobility M1,
5623 Rage XC or Rage XL chip and a laptop LCD display or any other LCD display
5624 that needs to be digitally driven. It is not necessary to enable this
5625 option if you are using an LCD display with a normal VGA connector,
5626 but it won't hurt if you do.
5628 ATI Radeon display support
5629 CONFIG_FB_RADEON
5630 Choose this option if you want to use an ATI Radeon graphics card as
5631 a framebuffer device. There are both PCI and AGP versions. You
5632 don't need to choose this to run the Radeon in plain VGA mode.
5633 There is a product page at
5634 <http://www.ati.com/na/pages/products/pc/radeon32/index.html>.
5636 SA-1100 LCD support
5637 CONFIG_FB_SA1100
5638 This is a framebuffer device for the SA-1100 LCD Controller.
5639 See <http://www.linux-fbdev.org/> for information on framebuffer
5640 devices.
5642 If you plan to use the LCD display with your SA-1100 system, say
5643 Y here.
5645 Advanced low level driver options
5646 CONFIG_FBCON_ADVANCED
5647 The frame buffer console uses character drawing routines that are
5648 tailored to the specific organization of pixels in the memory of
5649 your graphics hardware. These are called the low level frame buffer
5650 console drivers. Note that they are used for text console output
5651 only; they are NOT needed for graphical applications.
5653 If you say N here, the needed low level drivers are automatically
5654 enabled, depending on what frame buffer devices you selected above.
5655 This is recommended for most users.
5657 If you say Y here, you have more fine-grained control over which low
5658 level drivers are enabled. You can e.g. leave out low level drivers
5659 for color depths you do not intend to use for text consoles.
5661 Low level frame buffer console drivers can be modules ( = code which
5662 can be inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you
5663 want). The modules will be called fbcon-*.o. If you want to compile
5664 (some of) them as modules, read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
5666 If unsure, say N.
5668 Monochrome support
5669 CONFIG_FBCON_MFB
5670 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for monochrome
5671 (2 colors) packed pixels.
5673 2 bpp packed pixels support
5674 CONFIG_FBCON_CFB2
5675 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 2 bits per
5676 pixel (4 colors) packed pixels.
5678 4 bpp packed pixels support
5679 CONFIG_FBCON_CFB4
5680 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 4 bits per
5681 pixel (16 colors) packed pixels.
5683 8 bpp packed pixels support
5684 CONFIG_FBCON_CFB8
5685 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 8 bits per
5686 pixel (256 colors) packed pixels.
5688 16 bpp packed pixels support
5689 CONFIG_FBCON_CFB16
5690 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 15 or 16 bits
5691 per pixel (32K or 64K colors, also known as `hicolor') packed
5692 pixels.
5694 24 bpp packed pixels support
5695 CONFIG_FBCON_CFB24
5696 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 24 bits per
5697 pixel (16M colors, also known as `truecolor') packed pixels. It is
5698 NOT for `sparse' 32 bits per pixel mode.
5700 32 bpp packed pixels support
5701 CONFIG_FBCON_CFB32
5702 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 32 bits per
5703 pixel (16M colors, also known as `truecolor') sparse packed pixels.
5705 Amiga bitplanes support
5706 CONFIG_FBCON_AFB
5707 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 1 to 8
5708 bitplanes (2 to 256 colors) on Amiga.
5710 Amiga interleaved bitplanes support
5711 CONFIG_FBCON_ILBM
5712 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 1 to 8
5713 interleaved bitplanes (2 to 256 colors) on Amiga.
5715 Atari interleaved bitplanes (2 planes) support
5716 CONFIG_FBCON_IPLAN2P2
5717 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 2 interleaved
5718 bitplanes (4 colors) on Atari.
5720 Atari interleaved bitplanes (4 planes) support
5721 CONFIG_FBCON_IPLAN2P4
5722 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 4 interleaved
5723 bitplanes (16 colors) on Atari.
5725 Atari interleaved bitplanes (8 planes) support
5726 CONFIG_FBCON_IPLAN2P8
5727 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 8 interleaved
5728 bitplanes (256 colors) on Atari.
5730 Mac variable bpp packed pixels support
5731 CONFIG_FBCON_MAC
5732 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 1/2/4/8/16/32
5733 bits per pixel packed pixels on Mac. It supports variable font
5734 widths for low resolution screens.
5736 Permedia3 support (EXPERIMENTAL)
5737 CONFIG_FB_PM3
5738 This is the frame buffer device driver for the 3DLabs Permedia3
5739 chipset, used in Formac ProFormance III, 3DLabs Oxygen VX1 &
5740 similar boards, 3DLabs Permedia3 Create!, Appian Jeronimo 2000
5741 and maybe other boards.
5743 HGA monochrome support
5744 CONFIG_FBCON_HGA
5745 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for Hercules mono
5746 graphics cards.
5748 VGA characters/attributes support
5749 CONFIG_FBCON_VGA
5750 This is the low level frame buffer console driver for VGA text mode;
5751 it is used by frame buffer device drivers that support VGA text
5752 mode.
5754 Parallel-port support
5755 CONFIG_PARPORT
5756 If you want to use devices connected to your machine's parallel port
5757 (the connector at the computer with 25 holes), e.g. printer, ZIP
5758 drive, PLIP link (Parallel Line Internet Protocol is mainly used to
5759 create a mini network by connecting the parallel ports of two local
5760 machines) etc., then you need to say Y here; please read
5761 <file:Documentation/parport.txt> and
5762 <file:drivers/parport/BUGS-parport>.
5764 For extensive information about drivers for many devices attaching
5765 to the parallel port see <http://www.torque.net/linux-pp.html> on
5766 the WWW.
5768 It is possible to share a single parallel port among several devices
5769 and it is safe to compile all the corresponding drivers into the
5770 kernel. If you want to compile parallel port support as a module
5771 ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running
5772 kernel whenever you want), say M here and read
5773 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
5774 parport.o. If you have more than one parallel port and want to
5775 specify which port and IRQ to be used by this driver at module load
5776 time, take a look at <file:Documentation/parport.txt>.
5778 If unsure, say Y.
5780 PC-style hardware
5781 CONFIG_PARPORT_PC
5782 You should say Y here if you have a PC-style parallel port. All IBM
5783 PC compatible computers and some Alphas have PC-style parallel
5784 ports.
5786 This code is also available as a module. If you want to compile it
5787 as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the
5788 running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read
5789 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
5790 parport_pc.o.
5792 If unsure, say Y.
5794 Parallel+serial PCI multi-IO card support
5795 CONFIG_PARPORT_SERIAL
5796 This adds support for multi-IO PCI cards that have parallel and
5797 serial ports. You should say Y or M here. If you say M, the module
5798 will be called parport_serial.o.
5800 Use FIFO/DMA if available
5801 CONFIG_PARPORT_PC_FIFO
5802 Many parallel port chipsets provide hardware that can speed up
5803 printing. Say Y here if you want to take advantage of that.
5805 As well as actually having a FIFO, or DMA capability, the kernel
5806 will need to know which IRQ the parallel port has. By default,
5807 parallel port interrupts will not be used, and so neither will the
5808 FIFO. See <file:Documentation/parport.txt> to find out how to
5809 specify which IRQ/DMA to use.
5811 SuperIO chipset support
5812 CONFIG_PARPORT_PC_SUPERIO
5813 Saying Y here enables some probes for Super-IO chipsets in order to
5814 find out things like base addresses, IRQ lines and DMA channels. It
5815 is safe to say N.
5817 Support for PCMCIA management for PC-style ports
5818 CONFIG_PARPORT_PC_PCMCIA
5819 Say Y here if you need PCMCIA support for your PC-style parallel
5820 ports. If unsure, say N.
5822 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
5823 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
5824 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
5825 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
5826 parport_cs.o
5828 Support foreign hardware
5829 CONFIG_PARPORT_OTHER
5830 Say Y here if you want to be able to load driver modules to support
5831 other non-standard types of parallel ports. This causes a
5832 performance loss, so most people say N.
5834 Amiga built-in parallel port support
5835 CONFIG_PARPORT_AMIGA
5836 Say Y here if you need support for the parallel port hardware on
5837 Amiga machines. This code is also available as a module (say M),
5838 called parport_amiga.o. If in doubt, saying N is the safe plan.
5840 Atari built-in parallel port support
5841 CONFIG_PARPORT_ATARI
5842 Say Y here if you need support for the parallel port hardware on
5843 Atari machines. This code is also available as a module (say M),
5844 called parport_atari.o. If in doubt, saying N is the safe plan.
5846 Multiface III parallel port support
5847 CONFIG_PARPORT_MFC3
5848 Say Y here if you need parallel port support for the MFC3 card.
5849 This code is also available as a module (say M), called
5850 parport_mfc3.o. If in doubt, saying N is the safe plan.
5852 Support IEEE 1284 status readback
5853 CONFIG_PRINTER_READBACK
5854 If you have a device on your parallel port that support this
5855 protocol, this option will allow the device to report its status. It
5856 is safe to say Y.
5858 IEEE 1284 transfer modes
5859 CONFIG_PARPORT_1284
5860 If you have a printer that supports status readback or device ID, or
5861 want to use a device that uses enhanced parallel port transfer modes
5862 such as EPP and ECP, say Y here to enable advanced IEEE 1284
5863 transfer modes. Also say Y if you want device ID information to
5864 appear in /proc/sys/dev/parport/*/autoprobe*. It is safe to say N.
5866 Enable loadable module support
5867 CONFIG_MODULES
5868 Kernel modules are small pieces of compiled code which can be
5869 inserted in or removed from the running kernel, using the programs
5870 insmod and rmmod. This is described in the file
5871 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>, including the fact that you have
5872 to say "make modules" in order to compile the modules that you chose
5873 during kernel configuration. Modules can be device drivers, file
5874 systems, binary executable formats, and so on. If you think that you
5875 may want to make use of modules with this kernel in the future, then
5876 say Y here. If unsure, say Y.
5878 Set version information on all symbols for modules
5879 CONFIG_MODVERSIONS
5880 Usually, modules have to be recompiled whenever you switch to a new
5881 kernel. Saying Y here makes it possible, and safe, to use the
5882 same modules even after compiling a new kernel; this requires the
5883 program modprobe. All the software needed for module support is in
5884 the modutils package (check the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
5885 for location and latest version). NOTE: if you say Y here but don't
5886 have the program genksyms (which is also contained in the above
5887 mentioned modutils package), then the building of your kernel will
5888 fail. If you are going to use modules that are generated from
5889 non-kernel sources, you would benefit from this option. Otherwise
5890 it's not that important. So, N ought to be a safe bet.
5892 Kernel module loader support
5893 CONFIG_KMOD
5894 Normally when you have selected some drivers and/or file systems to
5895 be created as loadable modules, you also have the responsibility to
5896 load the corresponding modules (using the programs insmod or
5897 modprobe) before you can use them. If you say Y here however, the
5898 kernel will be able to load modules for itself: when a part of the
5899 kernel needs a module, it runs modprobe with the appropriate
5900 arguments, thereby loading the module if it is available. (This is a
5901 replacement for kerneld.) Say Y here and read about configuring it
5902 in <file:Documentation/kmod.txt>.
5904 ARP daemon support
5905 CONFIG_ARPD
5906 Normally, the kernel maintains an internal cache which maps IP
5907 addresses to hardware addresses on the local network, so that
5908 Ethernet/Token Ring/ etc. frames are sent to the proper address on
5909 the physical networking layer. For small networks having a few
5910 hundred directly connected hosts or less, keeping this address
5911 resolution (ARP) cache inside the kernel works well. However,
5912 maintaining an internal ARP cache does not work well for very large
5913 switched networks, and will use a lot of kernel memory if TCP/IP
5914 connections are made to many machines on the network.
5916 If you say Y here, the kernel's internal ARP cache will never grow
5917 to more than 256 entries (the oldest entries are expired in a LIFO
5918 manner) and communication will be attempted with the user space ARP
5919 daemon arpd. Arpd then answers the address resolution request either
5920 from its own cache or by asking the net.
5922 This code is experimental and also obsolete. If you want to use it,
5923 you need to find a version of the daemon arpd on the net somewhere,
5924 and you should also say Y to "Kernel/User network link driver",
5925 below. If unsure, say N.
5927 TCP/IP networking
5928 CONFIG_INET
5929 These are the protocols used on the Internet and on most local
5930 Ethernets. It is highly recommended to say Y here (this will enlarge
5931 your kernel by about 144 KB), since some programs (e.g. the X window
5932 system) use TCP/IP even if your machine is not connected to any
5933 other computer. You will get the so-called loopback device which
5934 allows you to ping yourself (great fun, that!).
5936 For an excellent introduction to Linux networking, please read the
5937 NET-3-HOWTO, available from
5938 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
5940 This option is also necessary if you want to use the full power of
5941 term (term is a program which gives you almost full Internet
5942 connectivity if you have a regular dial up shell account on some
5943 Internet connected Unix computer; for more information, read
5944 <http://www.bart.nl/~patrickr/term-howto/Term-HOWTO.html>).
5946 If you say Y here and also to "/proc file system support" and
5947 "Sysctl support" below, you can change various aspects of the
5948 behaviour of the TCP/IP code by writing to the (virtual) files in
5949 /proc/sys/net/ipv4/*; the options are explained in the file
5950 <file:Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt>.
5952 Short answer: say Y.
5954 IP multicasting
5955 CONFIG_IP_MULTICAST
5956 This is code for addressing several networked computers at once,
5957 enlarging your kernel by about 2 KB. You need multicasting if you
5958 intend to participate in the MBONE, a high bandwidth network on top
5959 of the Internet which carries audio and video broadcasts. More
5960 information about the MBONE is on the WWW at
5961 <http://www-itg.lbl.gov/mbone/>. Information about the multicast
5962 capabilities of the various network cards is contained in
5963 <file:Documentation/networking/multicast.txt>. For most people, it's
5964 safe to say N.
5966 Advanced router
5967 CONFIG_IP_ADVANCED_ROUTER
5968 If you intend to run your Linux box mostly as a router, i.e. as a
5969 computer that forwards and redistributes network packets, say Y; you
5970 will then be presented with several options that allow more precise
5971 control about the routing process.
5973 The answer to this question won't directly affect the kernel:
5974 answering N will just cause the configurator to skip all the
5975 questions about advanced routing.
5977 Note that your box can only act as a router if you enable IP
5978 forwarding in your kernel; you can do that by saying Y to "/proc
5979 file system support" and "Sysctl support" below and executing the
5980 line
5982 echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
5984 at boot time after the /proc file system has been mounted.
5986 If you turn on IP forwarding, you will also get the rp_filter, which
5987 automatically rejects incoming packets if the routing table entry
5988 for their source address doesn't match the network interface they're
5989 arriving on. This has security advantages because it prevents the
5990 so-called IP spoofing, however it can pose problems if you use
5991 asymmetric routing (packets from you to a host take a different path
5992 than packets from that host to you) or if you operate a non-routing
5993 host which has several IP addresses on different interfaces. To turn
5994 rp_filter off use:
5996 echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/<device>/rp_filter
5997 or
5998 echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
6000 If unsure, say N here.
6002 Policy routing
6003 CONFIG_IP_MULTIPLE_TABLES
6004 Normally, a router decides what to do with a received packet based
6005 solely on the packet's final destination address. If you say Y here,
6006 the Linux router will also be able to take the packet's source
6007 address into account. Furthermore, if you also say Y to "Use TOS
6008 value as routing key" below, the TOS (Type-Of-Service) field of the
6009 packet can be used for routing decisions as well. In addition, if
6010 you say Y here and to "Fast network address translation" below,
6011 the router will also be able to modify source and destination
6012 addresses of forwarded packets.
6014 If you are interested in this, please see the preliminary
6015 documentation at <http://www.compendium.com.ar/policy-routing.txt>
6016 and <ftp://post.tepkom.ru/pub/vol2/Linux/docs/advanced-routing.tex>.
6017 You will need supporting software from
6018 <ftp://ftp.inr.ac.ru/ip-routing/>.
6020 If unsure, say N.
6022 Equal cost multipath
6023 CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_MULTIPATH
6024 Normally, the routing tables specify a single action to be taken in
6025 a deterministic manner for a given packet. If you say Y here
6026 however, it becomes possible to attach several actions to a packet
6027 pattern, in effect specifying several alternative paths to travel
6028 for those packets. The router considers all these paths to be of
6029 equal "cost" and chooses one of them in a non-deterministic fashion
6030 if a matching packet arrives.
6032 Use TOS value as routing key
6033 CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_TOS
6034 The header of every IP packet carries a TOS (Type Of Service) value
6035 with which the packet requests a certain treatment, e.g. low
6036 latency (for interactive traffic), high throughput, or high
6037 reliability. If you say Y here, you will be able to specify
6038 different routes for packets with different TOS values.
6040 Use netfilter MARK value as routing key
6041 CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_FWMARK
6042 If you say Y here, you will be able to specify different routes for
6043 packets with different mark values (see iptables(8), MARK target).
6045 Verbose route monitoring
6046 CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_VERBOSE
6047 If you say Y here, which is recommended, then the kernel will print
6048 verbose messages regarding the routing, for example warnings about
6049 received packets which look strange and could be evidence of an
6050 attack or a misconfigured system somewhere. The information is
6051 handled by the klogd daemon which is responsible for kernel messages
6052 ("man klogd").
6054 Fast network address translation
6055 CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_NAT
6056 If you say Y here, your router will be able to modify source and
6057 destination addresses of packets that pass through it, in a manner
6058 you specify. General information about Network Address Translation
6059 can be gotten from the document
6060 <http://www.csn.tu-chemnitz.de/~mha/linux-ip-nat/diplom/nat.html>.
6062 Kernel level IP autoconfiguration
6063 CONFIG_IP_PNP
6064 This enables automatic configuration of IP addresses of devices and
6065 of the routing table during kernel boot, based on either information
6066 supplied on the kernel command line or by BOOTP or RARP protocols.
6067 You need to say Y only for diskless machines requiring network
6068 access to boot (in which case you want to say Y to "Root file system
6069 on NFS" as well), because all other machines configure the network
6070 in their startup scripts.
6072 BOOTP support
6073 CONFIG_IP_PNP_BOOTP
6074 If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
6075 one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
6076 net via NFS and you want the IP address of your computer to be
6077 discovered automatically at boot time using the BOOTP protocol (a
6078 special protocol designed for doing this job), say Y here. In case
6079 the boot ROM of your network card was designed for booting Linux and
6080 does BOOTP itself, providing all necessary information on the kernel
6081 command line, you can say N here. If unsure, say Y. Note that if you
6082 want to use BOOTP, a BOOTP server must be operating on your network.
6083 Read <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for details.
6085 DHCP support
6086 CONFIG_IP_PNP_DHCP
6087 If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
6088 one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
6089 net via NFS and you want the IP address of your computer to be
6090 discovered automatically at boot time using the DHCP protocol (a
6091 special protocol designed for doing this job), say Y here. In case
6092 the boot ROM of your network card was designed for booting Linux and
6093 does DHCP itself, providing all necessary information on the kernel
6094 command line, you can say N here.
6096 If unsure, say Y. Note that if you want to use DHCP, a DHCP server
6097 must be operating on your network. Read
6098 <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for details.
6100 RARP support
6101 CONFIG_IP_PNP_RARP
6102 If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
6103 one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
6104 net via NFS and you want the IP address of your computer to be
6105 discovered automatically at boot time using the RARP protocol (an
6106 older protocol which is being obsoleted by BOOTP and DHCP), say Y
6107 here. Note that if you want to use RARP, a RARP server must be
6108 operating on your network. Read <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for
6109 details.
6111 IP tunneling
6112 CONFIG_NET_IPIP
6113 Tunneling means encapsulating data of one protocol type within
6114 another protocol and sending it over a channel that understands the
6115 encapsulating protocol. This particular tunneling driver implements
6116 encapsulation of IP within IP, which sounds kind of pointless, but
6117 can be useful if you want to make your (or some other) machine
6118 appear on a different network than it physically is, or to use
6119 mobile-IP facilities (allowing laptops to seamlessly move between
6120 networks without changing their IP addresses; check out
6121 <http://anchor.cs.binghamton.edu/~mobileip/LJ/index.html>).
6123 Saying Y to this option will produce two modules ( = code which can
6124 be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
6125 want). Most people won't need this and can say N.
6127 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6128 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6129 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
6130 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
6131 ipip.o
6133 GRE tunnels over IP
6134 CONFIG_NET_IPGRE
6135 Tunneling means encapsulating data of one protocol type within
6136 another protocol and sending it over a channel that understands the
6137 encapsulating protocol. This particular tunneling driver implements
6138 GRE (Generic Routing Encapsulation) and at this time allows
6139 encapsulating of IPv4 or IPv6 over existing IPv4 infrastructure.
6140 This driver is useful if the other endpoint is a Cisco router: Cisco
6141 likes GRE much better than the other Linux tunneling driver ("IP
6142 tunneling" above). In addition, GRE allows multicast redistribution
6143 through the tunnel.
6145 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6146 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6147 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
6148 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
6149 ip_gre.o
6151 Broadcast GRE over IP
6152 CONFIG_NET_IPGRE_BROADCAST
6153 One application of GRE/IP is to construct a broadcast WAN (Wide Area
6154 Network), which looks like a normal Ethernet LAN (Local Area
6155 Network), but can be distributed all over the Internet. If you want
6156 to do that, say Y here and to "IP multicast routing" below.
6158 IP multicast routing
6159 CONFIG_IP_MROUTE
6160 This is used if you want your machine to act as a router for IP
6161 packets that have several destination addresses. It is needed on the
6162 MBONE, a high bandwidth network on top of the Internet which carries
6163 audio and video broadcasts. In order to do that, you would most
6164 likely run the program mrouted. Information about the multicast
6165 capabilities of the various network cards is contained in
6166 <file:Documentation/networking/multicast.txt>. If you haven't heard
6167 about it, you don't need it.
6169 PIM-SM version 1 support
6170 CONFIG_IP_PIMSM_V1
6171 Kernel side support for Sparse Mode PIM (Protocol Independent
6172 Multicast) version 1. This multicast routing protocol is used widely
6173 because Cisco supports it. You need special software to use it
6174 (pimd-v1). Please see <http://netweb.usc.edu/pim/> for more
6175 information about PIM.
6177 Say Y if you want to use PIM-SM v1. Note that you can say N here if
6178 you just want to use Dense Mode PIM.
6180 PIM-SM version 2 support
6181 CONFIG_IP_PIMSM_V2
6182 Kernel side support for Sparse Mode PIM version 2. In order to use
6183 this, you need an experimental routing daemon supporting it (pimd or
6184 gated-5). This routing protocol is not used widely, so say N unless
6185 you want to play with it.
6187 Unix domain sockets
6188 CONFIG_UNIX
6189 If you say Y here, you will include support for Unix domain sockets;
6190 sockets are the standard Unix mechanism for establishing and
6191 accessing network connections. Many commonly used programs such as
6192 the X Window system and syslog use these sockets even if your
6193 machine is not connected to any network. Unless you are working on
6194 an embedded system or something similar, you therefore definitely
6195 want to say Y here.
6197 However, the socket support is also available as a module ( = code
6198 which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
6199 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
6200 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be
6201 called unix.o. If you try building this as a module and you have
6202 said Y to "Kernel module loader support" above, be sure to add
6203 'alias net-pf-1 unix' to your /etc/modules.conf file. Note that
6204 several important services won't work correctly if you say M here
6205 and then neglect to load the module.
6207 Say Y unless you know what you are doing.
6209 The IPv6 protocol
6210 CONFIG_IPV6
6211 This is experimental support for the next version of the Internet
6212 Protocol: IP version 6 (also called IPng "IP next generation").
6213 Features of this new protocol include: expanded address space,
6214 authentication and privacy, and seamless interoperability with the
6215 current version of IP (IP version 4). For general information about
6216 IPv6, see <http://playground.sun.com/pub/ipng/html/ipng-main.html>;
6217 for specific information about IPv6 under Linux read the HOWTO at
6218 <http://www.bieringer.de/linux/IPv6/> and the file net/ipv6/README
6219 in the kernel source.
6221 If you want to use IPv6, please upgrade to the newest net-tools as
6222 given in <file:Documentation/Changes>. You will still be able to do
6223 regular IPv4 networking as well.
6225 This protocol support is also available as a module ( = code which
6226 can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
6227 want). The module will be called ipv6.o. If you want to compile it
6228 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
6230 It is safe to say N here for now.
6232 The SCTP Protocol (EXPERIMENTAL)
6233 CONFIG_IP_SCTP
6234 Stream Control Transmission Protocol
6236 From RFC 2960 (http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2960.txt)
6238 "SCTP is a reliable transport protocol operating on top of a
6239 connectionless packet network such as IP. It offers the following
6240 services to its users:
6242 -- acknowledged error-free non-duplicated transfer of user data,
6243 -- data fragmentation to conform to discovered path MTU size,
6244 -- sequenced delivery of user messages within multiple streams,
6245 with an option for order-of-arrival delivery of individual user
6246 messages,
6247 -- optional bundling of multiple user messages into a single SCTP
6248 packet, and
6249 -- network-level fault tolerance through supporting of multi-
6250 homing at either or both ends of an association."
6252 This protocol support is also available as a module ( = code which
6253 can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
6254 want). The module will be called sctp. If you want to compile it
6255 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
6257 If in doubt, say N.
6259 SCTP: Debug messages
6260 CONFIG_SCTP_DBG_MSG
6261 If you say Y, this will enable verbose debugging messages.
6263 If unsure, say N. However, if you are running into problems, use
6264 this option to gather detailed trace information
6266 SCTP: Debug object counts
6267 CONFIG_SCTP_DBG_OBJCNT
6268 If you say Y, this will enable debugging support for counting the
6269 type of objects that are currently allocated. This is useful for
6270 identifying memory leaks. If the /proc filesystem is enabled this
6271 debug information can be viewed by
6272 'cat /proc/net/sctp/sctp_dbg_objcnt'
6274 If unsure, say N
6276 #choice
6277 SCTP: HMAC algorithm
6278 CONFIG_SCTP_HMAC_NONE
6279 Choose an HMAC algorithm to be used during association establishment.
6280 It can be one of SHA1, MD5 or NONE. It is advised to use either HMAC-MD5
6281 or HMAC-SHA1.
6282 See configuration for Cryptographic API and enable these algorithms
6283 to make usable by SCTP.
6285 SCTP: SHA1 HMAC algorithm
6286 CONFIG_SCTP_HMAC_SHA1
6287 Enable the use of HMAC-SHA1 during association establishment. It
6288 is advised to use either HMAC-MD5 or HMAC-SHA1.
6289 See configuration for Cryptographic API and enable these algorithms
6290 to make usable by SCTP.
6292 SCTP: MD5 HMAC algorithm
6293 config SCTP_HMAC_MD5
6294 Enable the use of HMAC-MD5 during association establishment. It is
6295 advised to use either HMAC-MD5 or HMAC-SHA1.
6296 See configuration for Cryptographic API and enable these algorithms
6297 to make usable by SCTP.
6299 Kernel httpd acceleration
6300 CONFIG_KHTTPD
6301 The kernel httpd acceleration daemon (kHTTPd) is a (limited) web
6302 server built into the kernel. It is limited since it can only serve
6303 files from the file system and cannot deal with executable content
6304 such as CGI scripts. Serving files is sped up if you use kHTTPd.
6305 If kHTTPd is not able to fulfill a request, it can transparently
6306 pass it through to a user space web server such as apache.
6308 Saying "M" here builds the kHTTPd module; this is NOT enough to have
6309 a working kHTTPd. For safety reasons, the module has to be activated
6310 by doing a "echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/khttpd/start" after inserting the
6311 module.
6313 Before using this, read the README in net/khttpd !
6315 The kHTTPd is experimental. Be careful when using it on a production
6316 machine. Also note that kHTTPd doesn't support virtual servers yet.
6318 The IPX protocol
6319 CONFIG_IPX
6320 This is support for the Novell networking protocol, IPX, commonly
6321 used for local networks of Windows machines. You need it if you
6322 want to access Novell NetWare file or print servers using the Linux
6323 Novell client ncpfs (available from
6324 <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/ncpfs/>) or from
6325 within the Linux DOS emulator DOSEMU (read the DOSEMU-HOWTO,
6326 available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>). In order
6327 to do the former, you'll also have to say Y to "NCP file system
6328 support", below.
6330 IPX is similar in scope to IP, while SPX, which runs on top of IPX,
6331 is similar to TCP. There is also experimental support for SPX in
6332 Linux (see "SPX networking", below).
6334 To turn your Linux box into a fully featured NetWare file server and
6335 IPX router, say Y here and fetch either lwared from
6336 <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/network/daemons/> or
6337 mars_nwe from <ftp://www.compu-art.de/mars_nwe/>. For more
6338 information, read the IPX-HOWTO available from
6339 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
6341 General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
6342 Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.
6344 The IPX driver would enlarge your kernel by about 16 KB. This driver
6345 is also available as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and
6346 removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The module will
6347 be called ipx.o. If you want to compile it as a module, say M here
6348 and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. Unless you want to
6349 integrate your Linux box with a local Novell network, say N.
6351 Full internal IPX network
6352 CONFIG_IPX_INTERN
6353 Every IPX network has an address that identifies it. Sometimes it is
6354 useful to give an IPX "network" address to your Linux box as well
6355 (for example if your box is acting as a file server for different
6356 IPX networks: it will then be accessible from everywhere using the
6357 same address). The way this is done is to create a virtual internal
6358 "network" inside your box and to assign an IPX address to this
6359 network. Say Y here if you want to do this; read the IPX-HOWTO at
6360 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto> for details.
6362 The full internal IPX network enables you to allocate sockets on
6363 different virtual nodes of the internal network. This is done by
6364 evaluating the field sipx_node of the socket address given to the
6365 bind call. So applications should always initialize the node field
6366 to 0 when binding a socket on the primary network. In this case the
6367 socket is assigned the default node that has been given to the
6368 kernel when the internal network was created. By enabling the full
6369 internal IPX network the cross-forwarding of packets targeted at
6370 'special' sockets to sockets listening on the primary network is
6371 disabled. This might break existing applications, especially RIP/SAP
6372 daemons. A RIP/SAP daemon that works well with the full internal net
6373 can be found on <ftp://ftp.gwdg.de/pub/linux/misc/ncpfs/>.
6375 If you don't know what you are doing, say N.
6377 #(We're told this will come back someday)
6379 SPX networking
6380 CONFIG_SPX
6381 * Orphaned entry retained 20 April 2001 by Petr Vandrovec *
6382 * If you read this note from the configurator, please contact *
6383 * the Configure.help maintainers. *
6384 The Sequenced Packet eXchange protocol is a transport layer protocol
6385 built on top of IPX. It is used in Novell NetWare systems for
6386 client-server applications and is similar to TCP (which runs on top
6387 of IP).
6389 Note that Novell NetWare file sharing does not use SPX; it uses a
6390 protocol called NCP, for which separate Linux support is available
6391 ("NCP file system support" below for the client side, and the user
6392 space programs lwared or mars_nwe for the server side).
6394 Say Y here if you have use for SPX; read the IPX-HOWTO at
6395 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto> for details.
6397 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6398 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6399 The module will be called af_spx.o. If you want to compile it as a
6400 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
6402 DECnet networking
6403 CONFIG_DECNET
6404 The DECnet networking protocol was used in many products made by
6405 Digital (now Compaq). It provides reliable stream and sequenced
6406 packet communications over which run a variety of services similar
6407 to those which run over TCP/IP.
6409 To find some tools to use with the kernel layer support, please
6410 look at Patrick Caulfield's web site:
6411 <http://linux.dreamtime.org/decnet/>.
6413 More detailed documentation is available in
6414 <file:Documentation/networking/decnet.txt>.
6416 Be sure to say Y to "/proc file system support" and "Sysctl support"
6417 below when using DECnet, since you will need sysctl support to aid
6418 in configuration at run time.
6420 The DECnet code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6421 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6422 The module is called decnet.o.
6424 DECnet SIOCFIGCONF support
6425 CONFIG_DECNET_SIOCGIFCONF
6426 This option should only be turned on if you are really sure that
6427 you know what you are doing. It can break other applications which
6428 use this system call and the proper way to get the information
6429 provided by this call is to use rtnetlink.
6431 If unsure, say N.
6433 DECnet router support
6434 CONFIG_DECNET_ROUTER
6435 Add support for turning your DECnet Endnode into a level 1 or 2
6436 router. This is an unfinished option for developers only. If you
6437 do say Y here, then make sure that you also say Y to "Kernel/User
6438 network link driver", "Routing messages" and "Network packet
6439 filtering". The first two are required to allow configuration via
6440 rtnetlink (currently you need Alexey Kuznetsov's iproute2 package
6441 from <ftp://ftp.inr.ac.ru/>). The "Network packet filtering" option
6442 will be required for the forthcoming routing daemon to work.
6444 See <file:Documentation/networking/decnet.txt> for more information.
6446 Use FWMARK value as DECnet routing key
6447 CONFIG_DECNET_ROUTE_FWMARK
6448 If you say Y here, you will be able to specify different routes for
6449 packets with different FWMARK ("firewalling mark") values
6450 (see ipchains(8), "-m" argument).
6452 AppleTalk interfaces support
6453 CONFIG_DEV_APPLETALK
6454 AppleTalk is the protocol that Apple computers can use to communicate
6455 on a network. If your Linux box is connected to such a network, and wish
6456 to do IP over it, or you have a LocalTalk card and wish to use it to
6457 connect to the AppleTalk network, say Y.
6459 AppleTalk protocol support
6460 CONFIG_ATALK
6461 AppleTalk is the protocol that Apple computers can use to communicate
6462 on a network. If your Linux box is connected to such a network and you
6463 wish to connect to it, say Y. You will need to use the netatalk package
6464 so that your Linux box can act as a print and file server for Macs as
6465 well as access AppleTalk printers. Check out
6466 <http://www.zettabyte.net/netatalk/> on the WWW for details.
6467 EtherTalk is the name used for AppleTalk over Ethernet and the
6468 cheaper and slower LocalTalk is AppleTalk over a proprietary Apple
6469 network using serial links. EtherTalk and LocalTalk are fully
6470 supported by Linux.
6472 General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
6473 Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>. The
6474 NET-3-HOWTO, available from
6475 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
6476 information as well.
6478 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6479 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6480 The module is called appletalk.o. If you want to compile it as a
6481 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. You
6482 almost certainly want to compile it as a module so you can restart
6483 your AppleTalk stack without rebooting your machine. I hear that
6484 the GNU boycott of Apple is over, so even politically correct people
6485 are allowed to say Y here.
6487 AppleTalk-IP driver support
6488 CONFIG_IPDDP
6489 This allows IP networking for users who only have AppleTalk
6490 networking available. This feature is experimental. With this
6491 driver, you can encapsulate IP inside AppleTalk (e.g. if your Linux
6492 box is stuck on an AppleTalk only network) or decapsulate (e.g. if
6493 you want your Linux box to act as an Internet gateway for a zoo of
6494 AppleTalk connected Macs). Please see the file
6495 <file:Documentation/networking/ipddp.txt> for more information.
6497 If you say Y here, the AppleTalk-IP support will be compiled into
6498 the kernel. In this case, you can either use encapsulation or
6499 decapsulation, but not both. With the following two questions, you
6500 decide which one you want.
6502 If you say M here, the AppleTalk-IP support will be compiled as a
6503 module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the
6504 running kernel whenever you want, read
6505 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>). The module is called ipddp.o.
6506 In this case, you will be able to use both encapsulation and
6507 decapsulation simultaneously, by loading two copies of the module
6508 and specifying different values for the module option ipddp_mode.
6510 IP to AppleTalk-IP Encapsulation support
6511 CONFIG_IPDDP_ENCAP
6512 If you say Y here, the AppleTalk-IP code will be able to encapsulate
6513 IP packets inside AppleTalk frames; this is useful if your Linux box
6514 is stuck on an AppleTalk network (which hopefully contains a
6515 decapsulator somewhere). Please see
6516 <file:Documentation/networking/ipddp.txt> for more information. If
6517 you said Y to "AppleTalk-IP driver support" above and you say Y
6518 here, then you cannot say Y to "AppleTalk-IP to IP Decapsulation
6519 support", below.
6521 AppleTalk-IP to IP Decapsulation support
6522 CONFIG_IPDDP_DECAP
6523 If you say Y here, the AppleTalk-IP code will be able to decapsulate
6524 AppleTalk-IP frames to IP packets; this is useful if you want your
6525 Linux box to act as an Internet gateway for an AppleTalk network.
6526 Please see <file:Documentation/networking/ipddp.txt> for more
6527 information. If you said Y to "AppleTalk-IP driver support" above
6528 and you say Y here, then you cannot say Y to "IP to AppleTalk-IP
6529 Encapsulation support", above.
6531 Apple/Farallon LocalTalk PC card support
6532 CONFIG_LTPC
6533 This allows you to use the AppleTalk PC card to connect to LocalTalk
6534 networks. The card is also known as the Farallon PhoneNet PC card.
6535 If you are in doubt, this card is the one with the 65C02 chip on it.
6536 You also need version 1.3.3 or later of the netatalk package.
6537 This driver is experimental, which means that it may not work.
6538 See the file <file:Documentation/networking/ltpc.txt>.
6540 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6541 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6542 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
6543 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
6544 ltpc.o
6546 COPS LocalTalk PC card support
6547 CONFIG_COPS
6548 This allows you to use COPS AppleTalk cards to connect to LocalTalk
6549 networks. You also need version 1.3.3 or later of the netatalk
6550 package. This driver is experimental, which means that it may not
6551 work. This driver will only work if you choose "AppleTalk DDP"
6552 networking support, above.
6553 Please read the file <file:Documentation/networking/cops.txt>.
6555 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6556 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6557 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
6558 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
6559 cops.o
6561 Dayna firmware support
6562 CONFIG_COPS_DAYNA
6563 Support COPS compatible cards with Dayna style firmware (Dayna
6564 DL2000/ Daynatalk/PC (half length), COPS LT-95, Farallon PhoneNET PC
6565 III, Farallon PhoneNET PC II).
6567 Tangent firmware support
6568 CONFIG_COPS_TANGENT
6569 Support COPS compatible cards with Tangent style firmware (Tangent
6570 ATB_II, Novell NL-1000, Daystar Digital LT-200.
6572 Amateur Radio support
6573 CONFIG_HAMRADIO
6574 If you want to connect your Linux box to an amateur radio, answer Y
6575 here. You want to read <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html> and
6576 the AX25-HOWTO, available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
6578 Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
6579 kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
6580 the questions about amateur radio.
6582 Amateur Radio AX.25 Level 2 protocol
6583 CONFIG_AX25
6584 This is the protocol used for computer communication over amateur
6585 radio. It is either used by itself for point-to-point links, or to
6586 carry other protocols such as tcp/ip. To use it, you need a device
6587 that connects your Linux box to your amateur radio. You can either
6588 use a low speed TNC (a Terminal Node Controller acts as a kind of
6589 modem connecting your computer's serial port to your radio's
6590 microphone input and speaker output) supporting the KISS protocol or
6591 one of the various SCC cards that are supported by the generic Z8530
6592 or the DMA SCC driver. Another option are the Baycom modem serial
6593 and parallel port hacks or the sound card modem (supported by their
6594 own drivers). If you say Y here, you also have to say Y to one of
6595 those drivers.
6597 Information about where to get supporting software for Linux amateur
6598 radio as well as information about how to configure an AX.25 port is
6599 contained in the AX25-HOWTO, available from
6600 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You might also want to
6601 check out the file <file:Documentation/networking/ax25.txt> in the
6602 kernel source. More information about digital amateur radio in
6603 general is on the WWW at
6604 <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html>.
6606 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6607 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6608 The module will be called ax25.o. If you want to compile it as a
6609 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
6611 AX.25 DAMA Slave support
6612 CONFIG_AX25_DAMA_SLAVE
6613 DAMA is a mechanism to prevent collisions when doing AX.25
6614 networking. A DAMA server (called "master") accepts incoming traffic
6615 from clients (called "slaves") and redistributes it to other slaves.
6616 If you say Y here, your Linux box will act as a DAMA slave; this is
6617 transparent in that you don't have to do any special DAMA
6618 configuration. (Linux cannot yet act as a DAMA server.) If unsure,
6619 say N.
6621 AX.25 DAMA Master support
6622 CONFIG_AX25_DAMA_MASTER
6623 DAMA is a mechanism to prevent collisions when doing AX.25
6624 networking. A DAMA server (called "master") accepts incoming traffic
6625 from clients (called "slaves") and redistributes it to other
6626 slaves. If you say Y here, your Linux box will act as a DAMA server.
6627 If unsure, say N.
6629 Amateur Radio NET/ROM support
6630 CONFIG_NETROM
6631 NET/ROM is a network layer protocol on top of AX.25 useful for
6632 routing.
6634 A comprehensive listing of all the software for Linux amateur radio
6635 users as well as information about how to configure an AX.25 port is
6636 contained in the AX25-HOWTO, available from
6637 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You also might want to
6638 check out the file <file:Documentation/networking/ax25.txt>. More
6639 information about digital amateur radio in general is on the WWW at
6640 <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html>.
6642 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6643 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6644 The module will be called netrom.o. If you want to compile it as a
6645 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
6647 Amateur Radio X.25 PLP (Rose)
6648 CONFIG_ROSE
6649 The Packet Layer Protocol (PLP) is a way to route packets over X.25
6650 connections in general and amateur radio AX.25 connections in
6651 particular, essentially an alternative to NET/ROM.
6653 A comprehensive listing of all the software for Linux amateur radio
6654 users as well as information about how to configure an AX.25 port is
6655 contained in the AX25-HOWTO, available from
6656 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You also might want to
6657 check out the file <file:Documentation/networking/ax25.txt>. More
6658 information about digital amateur radio in general is on the WWW at
6659 <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html>.
6661 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
6662 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
6663 The module will be called rose.o. If you want to compile it as a
6664 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
6666 Serial port KISS driver for AX.25
6667 CONFIG_MKISS
6668 KISS is a protocol used for the exchange of data between a computer
6669 and a Terminal Node Controller (a small embedded system commonly
6670 used for networking over AX.25 amateur radio connections; it
6671 connects the computer's serial port with the radio's microphone
6672 input and speaker output).
6674 Although KISS is less advanced than the 6pack protocol, it has
6675 the advantage that it is already supported by most modern TNCs
6676 without the need for a firmware upgrade.
6678 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6679 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6680 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
6681 will be called mkiss.o.
6683 Serial port 6PACK driver for AX.25
6684 CONFIG_6PACK
6685 6pack is a transmission protocol for the data exchange between your
6686 PC and your TNC (the Terminal Node Controller acts as a kind of
6687 modem connecting your computer's serial port to your radio's
6688 microphone input and speaker output). This protocol can be used as
6689 an alternative to KISS for networking over AX.25 amateur radio
6690 connections, but it has some extended functionality.
6692 Note that this driver is still experimental and might cause
6693 problems. For details about the features and the usage of the
6694 driver, read <file:Documentation/networking/6pack.txt>.
6696 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6697 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6698 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
6699 will be called 6pack.o.
6701 BPQ Ethernet driver
6702 CONFIG_BPQETHER
6703 AX.25 is the protocol used for computer communication over amateur
6704 radio. If you say Y here, you will be able to send and receive AX.25
6705 traffic over Ethernet (also called "BPQ AX.25"), which could be
6706 useful if some other computer on your local network has a direct
6707 amateur radio connection.
6709 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
6710 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6711 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
6712 will be called bpqether.o.
6714 High-speed (DMA) SCC driver for AX.25
6715 CONFIG_DMASCC
6716 This is a driver for high-speed SCC boards, i.e. those supporting
6717 DMA on one port. You usually use those boards to connect your
6718 computer to an amateur radio modem (such as the WA4DSY 56kbps
6719 modem), in order to send and receive AX.25 packet radio network
6720 traffic.
6722 Currently, this driver supports Ottawa PI/PI2, Paccomm/Gracilis
6723 PackeTwin, and S5SCC/DMA boards. They are detected automatically.
6724 If you have one of these cards, say Y here and read the AX25-HOWTO,
6725 available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
6727 This driver can operate multiple boards simultaneously. If you
6728 compile it as a module (by saying M instead of Y), it will be called
6729 dmascc.o. If you don't pass any parameter to the driver, all
6730 possible I/O addresses are probed. This could irritate other devices
6731 that are currently not in use. You may specify the list of addresses
6732 to be probed by "dmascc=addr1,addr2,..." (when compiled into the
6733 kernel image) or "io=addr1,addr2,..." (when loaded as a module). The
6734 network interfaces will be called dmascc0 and dmascc1 for the board
6735 detected first, dmascc2 and dmascc3 for the second one, and so on.
6737 Before you configure each interface with ifconfig, you MUST set
6738 certain parameters, such as channel access timing, clock mode, and
6739 DMA channel. This is accomplished with a small utility program,
6740 dmascc_cfg, available at
6741 <http://www.nt.tuwien.ac.at/~kkudielk/Linux/>. Please be sure to get
6742 at least version 1.27 of dmascc_cfg, as older versions will not
6743 work with the current driver.
6745 Z8530 SCC driver for AX.25
6746 CONFIG_SCC
6747 These cards are used to connect your Linux box to an amateur radio
6748 in order to communicate with other computers. If you want to use
6749 this, read <file:Documentation/networking/z8530drv.txt> and the
6750 AX25-HOWTO, available from
6751 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Also make sure to say Y
6752 to "Amateur Radio AX.25 Level 2" support.
6754 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
6755 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6756 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
6757 will be called scc.o.
6759 Support for TRX that feedback the tx signal to rx
6760 CONFIG_SCC_TRXECHO
6761 Some transmitters feed the transmitted signal back to the receive
6762 line. Say Y here to foil this by explicitly disabling the receiver
6763 during data transmission. If in doubt, say Y.
6765 Additional delay for PA0HZP OptoSCC compatible boards
6766 CONFIG_SCC_DELAY
6767 Say Y here if you experience problems with the SCC driver not
6768 working properly; please read
6769 <file:Documentation/networking/z8530drv.txt> for details. If unsure,
6770 say N.
6772 YAM driver for AX.25
6773 CONFIG_YAM
6774 The YAM is a modem for packet radio which connects to the serial
6775 port and includes some of the functions of a Terminal Node
6776 Controller. If you have one of those, say Y here.
6778 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
6779 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6780 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
6781 will be called yam.o.
6783 BAYCOM picpar and par96 driver for AX.25
6784 CONFIG_BAYCOM_PAR
6785 This is a driver for Baycom style simple amateur radio modems that
6786 connect to a parallel interface. The driver supports the picpar and
6787 par96 designs. To configure the driver, use the sethdlc utility
6788 available in the standard ax25 utilities package. For information on
6789 the modems, see <http://www.baycom.de/> and the file
6790 <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
6792 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6793 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6794 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. This is
6795 recommended. The module will be called baycom_par.o.
6797 BAYCOM EPP driver for AX.25
6798 CONFIG_BAYCOM_EPP
6799 This is a driver for Baycom style simple amateur radio modems that
6800 connect to a parallel interface. The driver supports the EPP
6801 designs. To configure the driver, use the sethdlc utility available
6802 in the standard ax25 utilities package. For information on the
6803 modems, see <http://www.baycom.de/> and the file
6804 <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
6806 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6807 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6808 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. This is
6809 recommended. The module will be called baycom_par.o.
6811 BAYCOM ser12 full-duplex driver for AX.25
6812 CONFIG_BAYCOM_SER_FDX
6813 This is one of two drivers for Baycom style simple amateur radio
6814 modems that connect to a serial interface. The driver supports the
6815 ser12 design in full-duplex mode. In addition, it allows the
6816 baudrate to be set between 300 and 4800 baud (however not all modems
6817 support all baudrates). This is the preferred driver. The next
6818 driver, "BAYCOM ser12 half-duplex driver for AX.25" is the old
6819 driver and still provided in case this driver does not work with
6820 your serial interface chip. To configure the driver, use the sethdlc
6821 utility available in the standard ax25 utilities package. For
6822 information on the modems, see <http://www.baycom.de/> and
6823 <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
6825 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6826 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6827 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. This is
6828 recommended. The module will be called baycom_ser_fdx.o.
6830 BAYCOM ser12 half-duplex driver for AX.25
6831 CONFIG_BAYCOM_SER_HDX
6832 This is one of two drivers for Baycom style simple amateur radio
6833 modems that connect to a serial interface. The driver supports the
6834 ser12 design in full-duplex mode. This is the old driver. It is
6835 still provided in case your serial interface chip does not work with
6836 the full-duplex driver. This driver is depreciated. To configure
6837 the driver, use the sethdlc utility available in the standard ax25
6838 utilities package. For information on the modems, see
6839 <http://www.baycom.de/> and
6840 <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
6842 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6843 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6844 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. This is
6845 recommended. The module will be called baycom_ser_hdx.o.
6847 Sound card modem driver for AX.25
6848 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM
6849 This experimental driver allows a standard Sound Blaster or
6850 WindowsSoundSystem compatible sound card to be used as a packet
6851 radio modem (NOT as a telephone modem!), to send digital traffic
6852 over amateur radio.
6854 To configure the driver, use the sethdlc, smdiag and smmixer
6855 utilities available in the standard ax25 utilities package. For
6856 information on how to key the transmitter, see
6857 <http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/~sailer/pcf/ptt_circ/ptt.html> and
6858 <file:Documentation/networking/soundmodem.txt>.
6860 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6861 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6862 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. This is
6863 recommended. The module will be called soundmodem.o.
6865 Sound card modem support for Sound Blaster and compatible cards
6866 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_SBC
6867 This option enables the soundmodem driver to use Sound Blaster and
6868 compatible cards. If you have a dual mode card (i.e. a WSS cards
6869 with a Sound Blaster emulation) you should say N here and Y to
6870 "Sound card modem support for WSS and Crystal cards", below, because
6871 this usually results in better performance. This option also
6872 supports SB16/32/64 in full-duplex mode.
6874 Sound card modem support for WSS and Crystal cards
6875 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_WSS
6876 This option enables the soundmodem driver to use WindowsSoundSystem
6877 compatible cards. These cards feature a codec chip from either
6878 Analog Devices (such as AD1848, AD1845, AD1812) or Crystal
6879 Semiconductors (such as CS4248, CS423x). This option also supports
6880 the WSS full-duplex operation which currently works with Crystal
6881 CS423x chips. If you don't need full-duplex operation, do not enable
6882 it to save performance.
6884 Sound card modem support for 1200 baud AFSK modulation
6885 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK1200
6886 This option enables the soundmodem driver 1200 baud AFSK modem,
6887 compatible to popular modems using TCM3105 or AM7911. The
6888 demodulator requires about 12% of the CPU power of a Pentium 75 CPU
6889 per channel.
6891 Sound card modem support for 2400 baud AFSK modulation (7.3728MHz crystal)
6892 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK2400_7
6893 This option enables the soundmodem driver 2400 baud AFSK modem,
6894 compatible to TCM3105 modems (over-)clocked with a 7.3728MHz
6895 crystal. Note that the availability of this driver does _not_ imply
6896 that I recommend building such links. It is only here since users
6897 especially in eastern Europe have asked me to do so. In fact this
6898 modulation scheme has many disadvantages, mainly its incompatibility
6899 with many transceiver designs and the fact that the TCM3105 (if
6900 used) is operated widely outside its specifications.
6902 Sound card modem support for 2400 baud AFSK modulation (8MHz crystal)
6903 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK2400_8
6904 This option enables the soundmodem driver 2400 baud AFSK modem,
6905 compatible to TCM3105 modems (over-)clocked with an 8MHz crystal.
6906 Note that the availability of this driver does _not_ imply that I
6907 recommend building such links. It is only here since users
6908 especially in eastern Europe have asked me to do so. In fact this
6909 modulation scheme has many disadvantages, mainly its incompatibility
6910 with many transceiver designs and the fact that the TCM3105 (if
6911 used) is operated widely outside its specifications.
6913 Sound card modem support for 2666 baud AFSK modulation
6914 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK2666
6915 This option enables the soundmodem driver 2666 baud AFSK modem.
6916 This modem is experimental, and not compatible to anything
6917 else I know of.
6919 Sound card modem support for 4800 baud 8PSK modulation
6920 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_PSK4800
6921 This option enables the soundmodem driver 4800 baud 8PSK modem.
6922 This modem is experimental, and not compatible to anything
6923 else I know of.
6925 Sound card modem support for 4800 baud HAPN-1 modulation
6926 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_HAPN4800
6927 This option enables the soundmodem driver 4800 baud HAPN-1
6928 compatible modem. This modulation seems to be widely used 'down
6929 under' and in the Netherlands. Here, nobody uses it, so I could not
6930 test if it works. It is compatible to itself, however :-)
6932 Sound card modem support for 9600 baud FSK G3RUH modulation
6933 CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_FSK9600
6934 This option enables the soundmodem driver 9600 baud FSK modem,
6935 compatible to the G3RUH standard. The demodulator requires about 4%
6936 of the CPU power of a Pentium 75 CPU per channel. You can say Y to
6937 both 1200 baud AFSK and 9600 baud FSK if you want (but obviously you
6938 can only use one protocol at a time, depending on what the other end
6939 can understand).
6941 CCITT X.25 Packet Layer
6942 CONFIG_X25
6943 X.25 is a set of standardized network protocols, similar in scope to
6944 frame relay; the one physical line from your box to the X.25 network
6945 entry point can carry several logical point-to-point connections
6946 (called "virtual circuits") to other computers connected to the X.25
6947 network. Governments, banks, and other organizations tend to use it
6948 to connect to each other or to form Wide Area Networks (WANs). Many
6949 countries have public X.25 networks. X.25 consists of two
6950 protocols: the higher level Packet Layer Protocol (PLP) (say Y here
6951 if you want that) and the lower level data link layer protocol LAPB
6952 (say Y to "LAPB Data Link Driver" below if you want that).
6954 You can read more about X.25 at <http://www.sangoma.com/x25.htm> and
6955 <http://www.cisco.com/univercd/data/doc/software/11_0/rpcg/cx25.htm>.
6956 Information about X.25 for Linux is contained in the files
6957 <file:Documentation/networking/x25.txt> and
6958 <file:Documentation/networking/x25-iface.txt>.
6960 One connects to an X.25 network either with a dedicated network card
6961 using the X.21 protocol (not yet supported by Linux) or one can do
6962 X.25 over a standard telephone line using an ordinary modem (say Y
6963 to "X.25 async driver" below) or over Ethernet using an ordinary
6964 Ethernet card and either the 802.2 LLC protocol (say Y to "802.2
6965 LLC" below) or LAPB over Ethernet (say Y to "LAPB Data Link Driver"
6966 and "LAPB over Ethernet driver" below).
6968 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
6969 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
6970 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
6971 will be called x25.o. If unsure, say N.
6973 LAPB Data Link Driver
6974 CONFIG_LAPB
6975 Link Access Procedure, Balanced (LAPB) is the data link layer (i.e.
6976 the lower) part of the X.25 protocol. It offers a reliable
6977 connection service to exchange data frames with one other host, and
6978 it is used to transport higher level protocols (mostly X.25 Packet
6979 Layer, the higher part of X.25, but others are possible as well).
6980 Usually, LAPB is used with specialized X.21 network cards, but Linux
6981 currently supports LAPB only over Ethernet connections. If you want
6982 to use LAPB connections over Ethernet, say Y here and to "LAPB over
6983 Ethernet driver" below. Read
6984 <file:Documentation/networking/lapb-module.txt> for technical
6985 details.
6987 If you want to compile this driver as a module though ( = code which
6988 can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
6989 want), say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The
6990 module will be called lapb.o. If unsure, say N.
6992 802.2 LLC
6993 CONFIG_LLC
6994 This is a Logical Link Layer protocol used for X.25 connections over
6995 Ethernet, using ordinary Ethernet cards.
6997 Frame Diverter
6998 CONFIG_NET_DIVERT
6999 The Frame Diverter allows you to divert packets from the
7000 network, that are not aimed at the interface receiving it (in
7001 promisc. mode). Typically, a Linux box setup as an Ethernet bridge
7002 with the Frames Diverter on, can do some *really* transparent www
7003 caching using a Squid proxy for example.
7005 This is very useful when you don't want to change your router's
7006 config (or if you simply don't have access to it).
7008 The other possible usages of diverting Ethernet Frames are
7009 numberous:
7010 - reroute smtp traffic to another interface
7011 - traffic-shape certain network streams
7012 - transparently proxy smtp connections
7013 - etc...
7015 For more informations, please refer to:
7016 <http://diverter.sourceforge.net/>
7017 <http://perso.wanadoo.fr/magpie/EtherDivert.html>
7019 If unsure, say N.
7021 802.1d Ethernet Bridging
7022 CONFIG_BRIDGE
7023 If you say Y here, then your Linux box will be able to act as an
7024 Ethernet bridge, which means that the different Ethernet segments it
7025 is connected to will appear as one Ethernet to the participants.
7026 Several such bridges can work together to create even larger
7027 networks of Ethernets using the IEEE 802.1 spanning tree algorithm.
7028 As this is a standard, Linux bridges will cooperate properly with
7029 other third party bridge products.
7031 In order to use the Ethernet bridge, you'll need the bridge
7032 configuration tools; see <file:Documentation/networking/bridge.txt>
7033 for location. Please read the Bridge mini-HOWTO for more
7034 information.
7036 Note that if your box acts as a bridge, it probably contains several
7037 Ethernet devices, but the kernel is not able to recognize more than
7038 one at boot time without help; for details read the Ethernet-HOWTO,
7039 available from in <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
7041 If you want to compile this code as a module ( = code which can be
7042 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
7043 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
7044 will be called bridge.o.
7046 If unsure, say N.
7048 Packet socket
7049 CONFIG_PACKET
7050 The Packet protocol is used by applications which communicate
7051 directly with network devices without an intermediate network
7052 protocol implemented in the kernel, e.g. tcpdump. If you want them
7053 to work, choose Y.
7055 This driver is also available as a module called af_packet.o ( =
7056 code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
7057 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
7058 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>; if you use modprobe
7059 or kmod, you may also want to add "alias net-pf-17 af_packet" to
7060 /etc/modules.conf.
7062 If unsure, say Y.
7064 Packet socket: mmapped IO
7065 CONFIG_PACKET_MMAP
7066 If you say Y here, the Packet protocol driver can use a faster and
7067 more efficient capture method. This feature also allows bigger
7068 receive buffers. To take advantage of this method who have to use
7069 a libpcap library that supports it. For more info see
7070 <file:Documentation/networking/packet_mmap.txt>.
7072 If unsure, say N.
7074 Netlink device emulation
7075 CONFIG_NETLINK_DEV
7076 This option will be removed soon. Any programs that want to use
7077 character special nodes like /dev/tap0 or /dev/route (all with major
7078 number 36) need this option, and need to be rewritten soon to use
7079 the real netlink socket.
7080 This is a backward compatibility option, choose Y for now.
7082 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7083 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7084 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
7085 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
7086 netlink_dev.o
7088 Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
7089 CONFIG_ATM
7090 ATM is a high-speed networking technology for Local Area Networks
7091 and Wide Area Networks. It uses a fixed packet size and is
7092 connection oriented, allowing for the negotiation of minimum
7093 bandwidth requirements.
7095 In order to participate in an ATM network, your Linux box needs an
7096 ATM networking card. If you have that, say Y here and to the driver
7097 of your ATM card below.
7099 Note that you need a set of user-space programs to actually make use
7100 of ATM. See the file <file:Documentation/networking/atm.txt> for
7101 further details.
7103 Classical IP over ATM
7104 CONFIG_ATM_CLIP
7105 Classical IP over ATM for PVCs and SVCs, supporting InARP and
7106 ATMARP. If you want to communication with other IP hosts on your ATM
7107 network, you will typically either say Y here or to "LAN Emulation
7108 (LANE)" below.
7110 Do NOT send ICMP if no neighbour
7111 CONFIG_ATM_CLIP_NO_ICMP
7112 Normally, an "ICMP host unreachable" message is sent if a neighbour
7113 cannot be reached because there is no VC to it in the kernel's
7114 ATMARP table. This may cause problems when ATMARP table entries are
7115 briefly removed during revalidation. If you say Y here, packets to
7116 such neighbours are silently discarded instead.
7118 RFC1483/2684 Bridged protocols
7119 CONFIG_ATM_BR2684
7120 ATM PVCs can carry ethernet PDUs according to rfc2684 (formerly 1483)
7121 This device will act like an ethernet from the kernels point of view,
7122 with the traffic being carried by ATM PVCs (currently 1 PVC/device).
7123 This is sometimes used over DSL lines. If in doubt, say N.
7125 Per-VC IP filter kludge
7126 CONFIG_ATM_BR2684_IPFILTER
7127 This is an experimental mechanism for users who need to terminating a
7128 large number of IP-only vcc's. Do not enable this unless you are sure
7129 you know what you are doing.
7131 LAN Emulation (LANE) support
7132 CONFIG_ATM_LANE
7133 LAN Emulation emulates services of existing LANs across an ATM
7134 network. Besides operating as a normal ATM end station client, Linux
7135 LANE client can also act as an proxy client bridging packets between
7136 ELAN and Ethernet segments. You need LANE if you want to try MPOA.
7138 Multi-Protocol Over ATM (MPOA) support
7139 CONFIG_ATM_MPOA
7140 Multi-Protocol Over ATM allows ATM edge devices such as routers,
7141 bridges and ATM attached hosts establish direct ATM VCs across
7142 subnetwork boundaries. These shortcut connections bypass routers
7143 enhancing overall network performance.
7145 ATM over TCP
7146 CONFIG_ATM_TCP
7147 ATM over TCP driver. Useful mainly for development and for
7148 experiments. If unsure, say N.
7150 Efficient Networks ENI155P
7151 CONFIG_ATM_ENI
7152 Driver for the Efficient Networks ENI155p series and SMC ATM
7153 Power155 155 Mbps ATM adapters. Both, the versions with 512KB and
7154 2MB on-board RAM (Efficient calls them "C" and "S", respectively),
7155 and the FPGA and the ASIC Tonga versions of the board are supported.
7156 The driver works with MMF (-MF or ...F) and UTP-5 (-U5 or ...D)
7157 adapters.
7159 This driver is also available as a module. If you want to compile
7160 it as a module, say M here and read
7161 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called eni.o.
7163 Enable extended debugging
7164 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_DEBUG
7165 Extended debugging records various events and displays that list
7166 when an inconsistency is detected. This mechanism is faster than
7167 generally using printks, but still has some impact on performance.
7168 Note that extended debugging may create certain race conditions
7169 itself. Enable this ONLY if you suspect problems with the driver.
7171 Fine-tune burst settings
7172 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_TUNE_BURST
7173 In order to obtain good throughput, the ENI NIC can transfer
7174 multiple words of data per PCI bus access cycle. Such a multi-word
7175 transfer is called a burst.
7177 The default settings for the burst sizes are suitable for most PCI
7178 chipsets. However, in some cases, large bursts may overrun buffers
7179 in the PCI chipset and cause data corruption. In such cases, large
7180 bursts must be disabled and only (slower) small bursts can be used.
7181 The burst sizes can be set independently in the send (TX) and
7182 receive (RX) direction.
7184 Note that enabling many different burst sizes in the same direction
7185 may increase the cost of setting up a transfer such that the
7186 resulting throughput is lower than when using only the largest
7187 available burst size.
7189 Also, sometimes larger bursts lead to lower throughput, e.g. on an
7190 Intel 440FX board, a drop from 135 Mbps to 103 Mbps was observed
7191 when going from 8W to 16W bursts.
7193 Enable 16W TX bursts (discouraged)
7194 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_16W
7195 Burst sixteen words at once in the send direction. This may work
7196 with recent PCI chipsets, but is known to fail with older chipsets.
7198 Enable 8W TX bursts (recommended)
7199 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_8W
7200 Burst eight words at once in the send direction. This is the default
7201 setting.
7203 Enable 4W TX bursts (optional)
7204 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_4W
7205 Burst four words at once in the send direction. You may want to try
7206 this if you have disabled 8W bursts. Enabling 4W if 8W is also set
7207 may or may not improve throughput.
7209 Enable 2W TX bursts (optional)
7210 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_2W
7211 Burst two words at once in the send direction. You may want to try
7212 this if you have disabled 4W and 8W bursts. Enabling 2W if 4W or 8W
7213 are also set may or may not improve throughput.
7215 Enable 16W RX bursts (discouraged)
7216 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_16W
7217 Burst sixteen words at once in the receive direction. This may work
7218 with recent PCI chipsets, but is known to fail with older chipsets.
7220 Enable 8W RX bursts (discouraged)
7221 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_8W
7222 Burst eight words at once in the receive direction. This may work
7223 with recent PCI chipsets, but is known to fail with older chipsets,
7224 such as the Intel Neptune series.
7226 Enable 4W RX bursts (recommended)
7227 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_4W
7228 Burst four words at once in the receive direction. This is the
7229 default setting. Enabling 4W if 8W is also set may or may not
7230 improve throughput.
7232 Enable 2W RX bursts (optional)
7233 CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_2W
7234 Burst two words at once in the receive direction. You may want to
7235 try this if you have disabled 4W and 8W bursts. Enabling 2W if 4W or
7236 8W are also set may or may not improve throughput.
7238 ZeitNet ZN1221/ZN1225
7239 CONFIG_ATM_ZATM
7240 Driver for the ZeitNet ZN1221 (MMF) and ZN1225 (UTP-5) 155 Mbps ATM
7241 adapters.
7243 This driver is also available as a module. If you want to compile
7244 it as a module, say M here and read
7245 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called zatm.o.
7247 Enable extended debugging
7248 CONFIG_ATM_ZATM_DEBUG
7249 Extended debugging records various events and displays that list
7250 when an inconsistency is detected. This mechanism is faster than
7251 generally using printks, but still has some impact on performance.
7252 Note that extended debugging may create certain race conditions
7253 itself. Enable this ONLY if you suspect problems with the driver.
7255 Fujitsu FireStream (FS50/FS155)
7256 CONFIG_ATM_FIRESTREAM
7257 Driver for the Fujitsu FireStream 155 (MB86697) and
7258 FireStream 50 (MB86695) ATM PCI chips.
7260 This driver is also available as a module. If you want to compile
7261 it as a module, say M here and read
7262 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
7263 firestream.o.
7265 Enable usec resolution timestamps
7266 CONFIG_ATM_ZATM_EXACT_TS
7267 The uPD98401 SAR chip supports a high-resolution timer (approx. 30
7268 MHz) that is used for very accurate reception timestamps. Because
7269 that timer overflows after 140 seconds, and also to avoid timer
7270 drift, time measurements need to be periodically synchronized with
7271 the normal system time. Enabling this feature will add some general
7272 overhead for timer synchronization and also per-packet overhead for
7273 time conversion.
7275 IDT 77201/11 (NICStAR) (ForeRunnerLE)
7276 CONFIG_ATM_NICSTAR
7277 The NICStAR chipset family is used in a large number of ATM NICs for
7278 25 and for 155 Mbps, including IDT cards and the Fore ForeRunnerLE
7279 series. Say Y if you have one of those.
7281 This driver is also available as a module. If you want to compile
7282 it as a module, say M here and read
7283 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
7284 nicstar.o.
7286 Use suni PHY driver (155Mbps)
7287 CONFIG_ATM_NICSTAR_USE_SUNI
7288 Support for the S-UNI and compatible PHYsical layer chips. These are
7289 found in most 155Mbps NICStAR based ATM cards, namely in the
7290 ForeRunner LE155 cards. This driver provides detection of cable~
7291 removal and reinsertion and provides some statistics. This driver
7292 doesn't have removal capability when compiled as a module, so if you
7293 need that capability don't include S-UNI support (it's not needed to
7294 make the card work).
7296 Use IDT77015 PHY driver (25Mbps)
7297 CONFIG_ATM_NICSTAR_USE_IDT77105
7298 Support for the PHYsical layer chip in ForeRunner LE25 cards. In
7299 addition to cable removal/reinsertion detection, this driver allows
7300 you to control the loopback mode of the chip via a dedicated IOCTL.
7301 This driver is required for proper handling of temporary carrier
7302 loss, so if you have a 25Mbps NICStAR based ATM card you must say Y.
7304 IDT 77252 (NICStAR II)
7305 CONFIG_ATM_IDT77252
7306 Driver for the IDT 77252 ATM PCI chips.
7308 This driver is also available as a module. If you want to compile
7309 it as a module, say M here and read
7310 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called idt77252.o
7312 Enable debugging messages
7313 CONFIG_ATM_IDT77252_DEBUG
7314 Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
7315 messages is controlled by a bitmap. This may be specified as a
7316 module argument. See the file <file:drivers/atm/idt77252.h> for
7317 the meanings of the bits in the mask.
7319 When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
7320 speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
7321 inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
7323 Receive ALL cells in raw queue
7324 CONFIG_ATM_IDT77252_RCV_ALL
7325 Enable receiving of all cells on the ATM link, that do not match
7326 an open connection in the raw cell queue of the driver. Useful
7327 for debugging or special applications only, so the safe answer is N.
7329 Madge Ambassador (Collage PCI 155 Server)
7330 CONFIG_ATM_AMBASSADOR
7331 This is a driver for ATMizer based ATM card produced by Madge
7332 Networks Ltd. Say Y (or M to compile as a module named ambassador.o)
7333 here if you have one of these cards.
7335 Enable debugging messages
7336 CONFIG_ATM_AMBASSADOR_DEBUG
7337 Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
7338 messages is controlled by a bitmap. This may be specified as a
7339 module argument (kernel command line argument as well?), changed
7340 dynamically using an ioctl (not yet) or changed by sending the
7341 string "Dxxxx" to VCI 1023 (where x is a hex digit). See the file
7342 <file:drivers/atm/ambassador.h> for the meanings of the bits in the
7343 mask.
7345 When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
7346 speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
7347 inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
7349 Madge Horizon [Ultra] (Collage PCI 25 and Collage PCI 155 Client)
7350 CONFIG_ATM_HORIZON
7351 This is a driver for the Horizon chipset ATM adapter cards once
7352 produced by Madge Networks Ltd. Say Y (or M to compile as a module
7353 named horizon.o) here if you have one of these cards.
7355 Enable debugging messages
7356 CONFIG_ATM_HORIZON_DEBUG
7357 Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
7358 messages is controlled by a bitmap. This may be specified as a
7359 module argument (kernel command line argument as well?), changed
7360 dynamically using an ioctl (not yet) or changed by sending the
7361 string "Dxxxx" to VCI 1023 (where x is a hex digit). See the file
7362 <file:drivers/atm/horizon.h> for the meanings of the bits in the
7363 mask.
7365 When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
7366 speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
7367 inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
7369 Interphase ATM PCI x575/x525/x531
7370 CONFIG_ATM_IA
7371 This is a driver for the Interphase (i)ChipSAR adapter cards
7372 which include a variety of variants in term of the size of the
7373 control memory (128K-1KVC, 512K-4KVC), the size of the packet
7374 memory (128K, 512K, 1M), and the PHY type (Single/Multi mode OC3,
7375 UTP155, UTP25, DS3 and E3). Go to:
7376 <http://www.iphase.com/products/ClassSheet.cfm?ClassID=ATM>
7377 for more info about the cards. Say Y (or M to compile as a module
7378 named iphase.o) here if you have one of these cards.
7380 See the file <file:Documentation/networking/iphase.txt> for further
7381 details.
7383 Enable debugging messages
7384 CONFIG_ATM_IA_DEBUG
7385 Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
7386 messages is controlled by a bitmap. This may be specified as a
7387 module argument (kernel command line argument as well?), changed
7388 dynamically using an ioctl (Get the debug utility, iadbg, from
7389 <ftp://ftp.iphase.com/pub/atm/pci/>).
7391 See the file <file:drivers/atm/iphase.h> for the meanings of the
7392 bits in the mask.
7394 When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
7395 speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
7396 inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
7398 Efficient Networks Speedstream 3010
7399 CONFIG_ATM_LANAI
7400 Supports ATM cards based on the Efficient Networks "Lanai"
7401 chipset such as the Speedstream 3010 and the ENI-25p. The
7402 Speedstream 3060 is currently not supported since we don't
7403 have the code to drive the on-board Alcatel DSL chipset (yet).
7405 Linux telephony support
7406 CONFIG_PHONE
7407 Say Y here if you have a telephony card, which for example allows
7408 you to use a regular phone for voice-over-IP applications.
7410 Note: this has nothing to do with modems. You do not need to say Y
7411 here in order to be able to use a modem under Linux.
7413 This support is also available as a module. If you want to compile
7414 it as a module, say M here and read
7415 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
7416 phonedev.o.
7418 Compaq Smart Array support
7419 CONFIG_BLK_CPQ_CISS_DA
7420 This is the driver for Compaq Smart Array 5xxx controllers.
7421 Everyone using these boards should say Y here.
7422 See <file:Documentation/cciss.txt> for the current list of
7423 boards supported by this driver, and for further information
7424 on the use of this driver.
7426 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7427 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7428 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
7429 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
7430 cciss.o
7432 SCSI tape drive support for Smart Array 5xxx
7433 CONFIG_CISS_SCSI_TAPE
7434 When enabled (Y), this option allows SCSI tape drives and SCSI medium
7435 changers (tape robots) to be accessed via a Compaq 5xxx array
7436 controller. (See <file:Documentation/cciss.txt> for more details.)
7438 "SCSI support" and "SCSI tape support" must also be enabled for this
7439 option to work.
7441 When this option is disabled (N), the SCSI portion of the driver
7442 is not compiled.
7444 Enable monitor thread
7445 CONFIG_CISS_MONITOR_THREAD
7446 Intended for use with multipath configurations (see the md driver).
7447 This option allows a per-adapter monitoring thread to periodically
7448 poll the adapter to detect failure modes in which the processor
7449 is unable to receive interrupts from the adapter, thus enabling
7450 fail-over to an alternate adapter in such situations. See
7451 <file:Documentation/cciss.txt> for more details.
7453 QuickNet Internet LineJack/PhoneJack support
7454 CONFIG_PHONE_IXJ
7455 Say M if you have a telephony card manufactured by Quicknet
7456 Technologies, Inc. These include the Internet PhoneJACK and
7457 Internet LineJACK Telephony Cards. You will get a module called
7458 ixj.o.
7460 For the ISA versions of these products, you can configure the
7461 cards using the isapnp tools (pnpdump/isapnp) or you can use the
7462 isapnp support. Please read <file:Documentation/telephony/ixj.txt>.
7464 For more information on these cards, see Quicknet's web site at:
7465 <http://www.quicknet.net/>.
7467 If you do not have any Quicknet telephony cards, you can safely
7468 say N here.
7470 QuickNet Internet LineJack/PhoneJack PCMCIA support
7471 CONFIG_PHONE_IXJ_PCMCIA
7472 Say Y here to configure in PCMCIA service support for the Quicknet
7473 cards manufactured by Quicknet Technologies, Inc. This builds an
7474 additional support module for the PCMCIA version of the card.
7476 FORE Systems 200E-series
7477 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_MAYBE
7478 This is a driver for the FORE Systems 200E-series ATM adapter
7479 cards. It simultaneously supports PCA-200E and SBA-200E models
7480 on PCI and SBUS hosts. Say Y (or M to compile as a module
7481 named fore_200e.o) here if you have one of these ATM adapters.
7483 Note that the driver will actually be compiled only if you
7484 additionally enable the support for PCA-200E and/or SBA-200E
7485 cards.
7487 See the file <file:Documentation/networking/fore200e.txt> for
7488 further details.
7490 Enable PCA-200E card support on PCI-based hosts
7491 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_PCA
7492 Say Y here if you want your PCA-200E cards to be probed.
7494 Use default PCA-200E firmware
7495 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_PCA_DEFAULT_FW
7496 Use the default PCA-200E firmware data shipped with the driver.
7498 Normal users do not have to deal with the firmware stuff, so
7499 they should say Y here.
7501 Pathname of user-supplied binary firmware
7502 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_PCA_FW
7503 This defines the pathname of an alternative PCA-200E binary
7504 firmware image supplied by the user. This pathname may be
7505 absolute or relative to the drivers/atm directory.
7507 The driver comes with an adequate firmware image, so normal users do
7508 not have to supply an alternative one. They just say Y to "Use
7509 default PCA-200E firmware" instead.
7511 Enable SBA-200E card support on SBUS-based hosts
7512 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_SBA
7513 Say Y here if you want your SBA-200E cards to be probed.
7515 Use default SBA-200E firmware
7516 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_SBA_DEFAULT_FW
7517 Use the default SBA-200E firmware data shipped with the driver.
7519 Normal users do not have to deal with the firmware stuff, so
7520 they should say Y here.
7522 Pathname of user-supplied binary firmware
7523 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_SBA_FW
7524 This defines the pathname of an alternative SBA-200E binary
7525 firmware image supplied by the user. This pathname may be
7526 absolute or relative to the drivers/atm directory.
7528 The driver comes with an adequate firmware image, so normal users do
7529 not have to supply an alternative one. They just say Y to "Use
7530 default SBA-200E firmware", above.
7532 Maximum number of tx retries
7533 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_TX_RETRY
7534 Specifies the number of times the driver attempts to transmit
7535 a message before giving up, if the transmit queue of the ATM card
7536 is transiently saturated.
7538 Saturation of the transmit queue may occur only under extreme
7539 conditions, e.g. when a fast host continuously submits very small
7540 frames (<64 bytes) or raw AAL0 cells (48 bytes) to the ATM adapter.
7542 Note that under common conditions, it is unlikely that you encounter
7543 a saturation of the transmit queue, so the retry mechanism never
7544 comes into play.
7546 Debugging level (0-3)
7547 CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_DEBUG
7548 Specifies the level of debugging messages issued by the driver.
7549 The verbosity of the driver increases with the value of this
7550 parameter.
7552 When active, these messages can have a significant impact on
7553 the performances of the driver, and the size of your syslog files!
7554 Keep the debugging level to 0 during normal operations.
7556 ForeRunner HE Series
7557 CONFIG_ATM_HE
7558 This is a driver for the Marconi ForeRunner HE-series ATM adapter
7559 cards. It simultaneously supports the 155 and 622 versions.
7561 Use S/UNI PHY driver
7562 Support for the S/UNI-Ultra and S/UNI-622 found in the ForeRunner
7563 HE cards. This driver provides carrier detection some statistics.
7565 PPP over ATM
7566 CONFIG_PPPOATM
7567 Support PPP (Point to Point Protocol) encapsulated in ATM frames.
7568 This implementation does not yet comply with section 8 of RFC2364,
7569 which can lead to bad results idf the ATM peer loses state and
7570 changes its encapsulation unilaterally.
7572 Fusion MPT device support
7573 CONFIG_FUSION
7574 LSI Logic Fusion(TM) Message Passing Technology (MPT) device support
7575 provides high performance SCSI host initiator, and LAN [1] interface
7576 services to a host system. The Fusion architecture is capable of
7577 duplexing these protocols on high-speed Fibre Channel
7578 (up to 2 GHz x 2 ports = 4 GHz) and parallel SCSI (up to Ultra-320)
7579 physical medium.
7581 [1] LAN is not supported on parallel SCSI medium.
7583 These drivers require a Fusion MPT compatible PCI adapter installed
7584 in the host system. MPT adapters contain specialized I/O processors
7585 to handle I/O workload, and more importantly to offload this work
7586 from the host CPU(s).
7588 If you have Fusion MPT hardware and want to use it, you can say
7589 Y or M here to add MPT (base + ScsiHost) drivers.
7590 <Y> = build lib (fusion.o), and link [static] into the kernel [2]
7591 proper
7592 <M> = compiled as [dynamic] modules [3] named: (mptbase.o,
7593 mptscsih.o)
7595 [2] In order enable capability to boot the linux kernel
7596 natively from a Fusion MPT target device, you MUST
7597 answer Y here! (currently requires CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SD)
7598 [3] This support is also available as a module ( = code
7599 which can be inserted in and removed from the running
7600 kernel whenever you want). If you want to compile as
7601 modules, say M here and read
7602 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
7604 If unsure, say N.
7606 If you say Y or M here you will get a choice of these
7607 additional protocol and support module options: Module Name:
7608 <M> Enhanced SCSI error reporting (isense.o)
7609 <M> Fusion MPT misc device (ioctl) driver (mptctl.o)
7610 <M> Fusion MPT LAN driver (mptlan.o)
7612 ---
7613 Fusion MPT is trademark of LSI Logic Corporation, and its
7614 architecture is based on LSI Logic's Message Passing Interface (MPI)
7615 specification.
7617 Maximum number of scatter gather entries
7618 CONFIG_FUSION_MAX_SGE
7619 This option allows you to specify the maximum number of scatter-
7620 gather entries per I/O. The driver defaults to 40, a reasonable number
7621 for most systems. However, the user may increase this up to 128.
7622 Increasing this parameter will require significantly more memory
7623 on a per controller instance. Increasing the parameter is not
7624 necessary (or recommended) unless the user will be running
7625 large I/O's via the raw interface.
7627 Fusion MPT enhanced SCSI error reporting [optional] module
7628 CONFIG_FUSION_ISENSE
7629 The isense module (roughly stands for Interpret SENSE data) is
7630 completely optional. It simply provides extra English readable
7631 strings in SCSI Error Report(s) that might be generated from the
7632 Fusion MPT SCSI Host driver, for example when a target device
7633 returns a SCSI check condition on a I/O. Without this module
7634 loaded you might see:
7636 SCSI Error Report =-=-= (ioc0,scsi5:0)
7637 SCSI_Status=02h (CHECK_CONDITION)
7638 Original_CDB[]: 2A 00 00 00 00 41 00 00 02 00
7639 SenseData[12h]: 70 00 02 00 00 00 00 0A 00 00 00 00 04 02 02 00 00 00
7640 SenseKey=2h (NOT READY); FRU=02h
7641 ASC/ASCQ=29h/00h
7643 Where otherwise, if this module had been loaded, you would see:
7645 SCSI Error Report =-=-= (ioc0,scsi5:0)
7646 SCSI_Status=02h (CHECK_CONDITION)
7647 Original_CDB[]: 2A 00 00 00 00 41 00 00 02 00 - "WRITE(10)"
7648 SenseData[12h]: 70 00 02 00 00 00 00 0A 00 00 00 00 04 02 02 00 00 00
7649 SenseKey=2h (NOT READY); FRU=02h
7650 ASC/ASCQ=29h/00h "LOGICAL UNIT NOT READY, INITIALIZING CMD. REQUIRED"
7652 Say M for "Enhanced SCSI error reporting" to compile this optional module,
7653 creating a driver named: isense.o.
7655 NOTE: Support for building this feature into the kernel is not
7656 available, due to kernel size considerations.
7658 Fusion MPT misc device (ioctl) driver [optional] module
7659 CONFIG_FUSION_CTL
7660 The Fusion MPT misc device driver provides specialized control
7661 of MPT adapters via system ioctl calls. Use of ioctl calls to
7662 the MPT driver requires that you create and use a misc device
7663 node ala:
7664 mknod /dev/mptctl c 10 240
7666 One use of this ioctl interface is to perform an upgrade (reflash)
7667 of the MPT adapter firmware. Refer to readme file(s) distributed
7668 with the Fusion MPT linux driver for additional details.
7670 If enabled by saying M to this, a driver named: mptctl.o
7671 will be compiled.
7673 If unsure whether you really want or need this, say N.
7675 Fusion MPT LAN driver [optional]
7676 CONFIG_FUSION_LAN
7677 This module supports LAN IP traffic over Fibre Channel port(s)
7678 on Fusion MPT compatible hardware (LSIFC9xx chips).
7679 The physical interface used is defined in RFC 2625.
7680 Please refer to that document for details.
7682 Installing this driver requires the knowledge to configure and
7683 activate a new network interface, "fc0", using standard Linux tools.
7685 If enabled by saying M to this, a driver named: mptlan.o
7686 will be compiled.
7688 If unsure whether you really want or need this, say N.
7690 NOTES: This feature is NOT available nor supported for linux-2.2.x
7691 kernels. You must be building a linux-2.3.x or linux-2.4.x kernel
7692 in order to configure this option.
7693 Support for building this feature into the linux kernel is not
7694 yet available.
7696 SCSI support
7697 CONFIG_SCSI
7698 If you want to use a SCSI hard disk, SCSI tape drive, SCSI CD-ROM or
7699 any other SCSI device under Linux, say Y and make sure that you know
7700 the name of your SCSI host adapter (the card inside your computer
7701 that "speaks" the SCSI protocol, also called SCSI controller),
7702 because you will be asked for it.
7704 You also need to say Y here if you want support for the parallel
7705 port version of the 100 MB IOMEGA ZIP drive.
7707 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7708 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7709 The module will be called scsi_mod.o. If you want to compile it as
7710 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
7711 <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>. However, do not compile this as a
7712 module if your root file system (the one containing the directory /)
7713 is located on a SCSI device.
7715 SCSI disk support
7716 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SD
7717 If you want to use a SCSI hard disk or the SCSI or parallel port
7718 version of the IOMEGA ZIP drive under Linux, say Y and read the
7719 SCSI-HOWTO, the Disk-HOWTO and the Multi-Disk-HOWTO, available from
7720 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. This is NOT for SCSI
7721 CD-ROMs.
7723 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7724 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7725 The module will be called sd_mod.o. If you want to compile it as a
7726 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
7727 <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>. Do not compile this driver as a
7728 module if your root file system (the one containing the directory /)
7729 is located on a SCSI disk. In this case, do not compile the driver
7730 for your SCSI host adapter (below) as a module either.
7732 Maximum number of SCSI disks that can be loaded as modules
7733 CONFIG_SD_EXTRA_DEVS
7734 This controls the amount of additional space allocated in tables for
7735 drivers that are loaded as modules after the kernel is booted. In
7736 the event that the SCSI core itself was loaded as a module, this
7737 value is the number of additional disks that can be loaded after the
7738 first host driver is loaded.
7740 Admittedly this isn't pretty, but there are tons of race conditions
7741 involved with resizing the internal arrays on the fly. Someday this
7742 flag will go away, and everything will work automatically.
7744 If you don't understand what's going on, go with the default.
7746 Maximum number of SCSI tapes that can be loaded as modules
7747 CONFIG_ST_EXTRA_DEVS
7748 This controls the amount of additional space allocated in tables for
7749 drivers that are loaded as modules after the kernel is booted. In
7750 the event that the SCSI core itself was loaded as a module, this
7751 value is the number of additional tapes that can be loaded after the
7752 first host driver is loaded.
7754 Admittedly this isn't pretty, but there are tons of race conditions
7755 involved with resizing the internal arrays on the fly. Someday this
7756 flag will go away, and everything will work automatically.
7758 If you don't understand what's going on, go with the default.
7760 SCSI tape support
7761 CONFIG_CHR_DEV_ST
7762 If you want to use a SCSI tape drive under Linux, say Y and read the
7763 SCSI-HOWTO, available from
7764 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, and
7765 <file:drivers/scsi/README.st> in the kernel source. This is NOT for
7766 SCSI CD-ROMs.
7768 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7769 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7770 The module will be called st.o. If you want to compile it as a
7771 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
7772 <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.
7774 OnStream SC-x0 SCSI tape support
7775 CONFIG_CHR_DEV_OSST
7776 The OnStream SC-x0 SCSI tape drives can not be driven by the
7777 standard st driver, but instead need this special osst driver and
7778 use the /dev/osstX char device nodes (major 206). Via usb-storage
7779 and ide-scsi, you may be able to drive the USB-x0 and DI-x0 drives
7780 as well. Note that there is also a second generation of OnStream
7781 tape drives (ADR-x0) that supports the standard SCSI-2 commands for
7782 tapes (QIC-157) and can be driven by the standard driver st.
7783 For more information, you may have a look at the SCSI-HOWTO
7784 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto> and
7785 <file:drivers/scsi/README.osst> in the kernel source.
7786 More info on the OnStream driver may be found on
7787 <http://linux1.onstream.nl/test/>
7788 Please also have a look at the standard st docu, as most of it
7789 applies to osst as well.
7791 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7792 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7793 The module will be called osst.o. If you want to compile it as a
7794 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
7795 <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.
7797 SCSI CD-ROM support
7798 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SR
7799 If you want to use a SCSI CD-ROM under Linux, say Y and read the
7800 SCSI-HOWTO and the CD-ROM-HOWTO at
7801 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Also make sure to say Y
7802 or M to "ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system support" later.
7804 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7805 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7806 The module will be called sr_mod.o. If you want to compile it as a
7807 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
7808 <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.
7810 Maximum number of CD-ROM devices that can be loaded as modules
7811 CONFIG_SR_EXTRA_DEVS
7812 This controls the amount of additional space allocated in tables for
7813 drivers that are loaded as modules after the kernel is booted. In
7814 the event that the SCSI core itself was loaded as a module, this
7815 value is the number of additional CD-ROMs that can be loaded after
7816 the first host driver is loaded.
7818 Admittedly this isn't pretty, but there are tons of race conditions
7819 involved with resizing the internal arrays on the fly. Someday this
7820 flag will go away, and everything will work automatically.
7822 If you don't understand what's going on, go with the default.
7824 Enable vendor-specific extensions (for SCSI CD-ROM)
7825 CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SR_VENDOR
7826 This enables the usage of vendor specific SCSI commands. This is
7827 required to support multisession CDs with old NEC/TOSHIBA cdrom
7828 drives (and HP Writers). If you have such a drive and get the first
7829 session only, try saying Y here; everybody else says N.
7831 SCSI generic support
7832 CONFIG_CHR_DEV_SG
7833 If you want to use SCSI scanners, synthesizers or CD-writers or just
7834 about anything having "SCSI" in its name other than hard disks,
7835 CD-ROMs or tapes, say Y here. These won't be supported by the kernel
7836 directly, so you need some additional software which knows how to
7837 talk to these devices using the SCSI protocol:
7839 For scanners, look at SANE (<http://www.mostang.com/sane/>). For CD
7840 writer software look at Cdrtools
7841 (<http://www.fokus.gmd.de/research/cc/glone/employees/joerg.schilling/private/cdrecord.html>)
7842 and for burning a "disk at once": CDRDAO
7843 (<http://cdrdao.sourceforge.net/>). Cdparanoia is a high
7844 quality digital reader of audio CDs (<http://www.xiph.org/paranoia/>).
7845 For other devices, it's possible that you'll have to write the
7846 driver software yourself. Please read the file
7847 <file:Documentation/scsi-generic.txt> for more information.
7849 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
7850 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
7851 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
7852 <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>. The module will be called sg.o. If unsure,
7853 say N.
7855 Probe all LUNs on each SCSI device
7856 CONFIG_SCSI_MULTI_LUN
7857 If you have a SCSI device that supports more than one LUN (Logical
7858 Unit Number), e.g. a CD jukebox, and only one LUN is detected, you
7859 can say Y here to force the SCSI driver to probe for multiple LUNs.
7860 A SCSI device with multiple LUNs acts logically like multiple SCSI
7861 devices. The vast majority of SCSI devices have only one LUN, and
7862 so most people can say N here and should in fact do so, because it
7863 is safer.
7865 Verbose SCSI error reporting (kernel size +=12K)
7866 CONFIG_SCSI_CONSTANTS
7867 The error messages regarding your SCSI hardware will be easier to
7868 understand if you say Y here; it will enlarge your kernel by about
7869 12 KB. If in doubt, say Y.
7871 SCSI logging facility
7872 CONFIG_SCSI_LOGGING
7873 This turns on a logging facility that can be used to debug a number
7874 of SCSI related problems.
7876 If you say Y here, no logging output will appear by default, but you
7877 can enable logging by saying Y to "/proc file system support" and
7878 "Sysctl support" below and executing the command
7880 echo "scsi log token [level]" > /proc/scsi/scsi
7882 at boot time after the /proc file system has been mounted.
7884 There are a number of things that can be used for 'token' (you can
7885 find them in the source: <file:drivers/scsi/scsi.c>), and this
7886 allows you to select the types of information you want, and the
7887 level allows you to select the level of verbosity.
7889 If you say N here, it may be harder to track down some types of SCSI
7890 problems. If you say Y here your kernel will be somewhat larger, but
7891 there should be no noticeable performance impact as long as you have
7892 logging turned off.
7894 QDIO base support for IBM S/390 and zSeries
7895 CONFIG_QDIO
7896 This driver provides the Queued Direct I/O base support for the
7897 IBM S/390 (G5 and G6) and eServer zSeries (z800 and z900).
7899 For details please refer to the documentation provided by IBM at
7900 <http://www10.software.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/linux390>
7902 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7903 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7904 The module will be called qdio.o. If you want to compile it as a
7905 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
7907 If unsure, say Y.
7909 Performance statistics for QDIO base support
7910 CONFIG_QDIO_PERF_STATS
7911 Say Y here to get performance statistics in /proc/qdio_perf
7913 If unsure, say N.
7915 SGI WD93C93 SCSI Driver
7916 CONFIG_SCSI_SGIWD93
7917 Say Y here to support the on-board WD93C93 SCSI controller found (a)
7918 on the Indigo2 and other MIPS-based SGI machines, and (b) on ARCS
7919 ARM-based machines.
7921 DEC NCR53C94 SCSI Driver
7922 CONFIG_SCSI_DECNCR
7923 Say Y here to support the NCR53C94 SCSI controller chips on IOASIC
7924 based TURBOchannel DECstations and TURBOchannel PMAZ-A cards.
7926 AdvanSys SCSI support
7927 CONFIG_SCSI_ADVANSYS
7928 This is a driver for all SCSI host adapters manufactured by
7929 AdvanSys. It is documented in the kernel source in
7930 <file:drivers/scsi/advansys.c>.
7932 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7933 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7934 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
7935 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
7936 advansys.o.
7938 Adaptec AHA152X/2825 support
7939 CONFIG_SCSI_AHA152X
7940 This is a driver for the AHA-1510, AHA-1520, AHA-1522, and AHA-2825
7941 SCSI host adapters. It also works for the AVA-1505, but the IRQ etc.
7942 must be manually specified in this case.
7944 It is explained in section 3.3 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
7945 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You might also want to
7946 read the file <file:drivers/scsi/README.aha152x>.
7948 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7949 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7950 The module will be called aha152x.o. If you want to compile it as a
7951 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
7953 Adaptec AHA1542 support
7954 CONFIG_SCSI_AHA1542
7955 This is support for a SCSI host adapter. It is explained in section
7956 3.4 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
7957 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Note that Trantor was
7958 purchased by Adaptec, and some former Trantor products are being
7959 sold under the Adaptec name. If it doesn't work out of the box, you
7960 may have to change some settings in <file:drivers/scsi/aha1542.h>.
7962 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
7963 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
7964 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
7965 will be called aha1542.o.
7967 Adaptec AHA1740 support
7968 CONFIG_SCSI_AHA1740
7969 This is support for a SCSI host adapter. It is explained in section
7970 3.5 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
7971 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. If it doesn't work out
7972 of the box, you may have to change some settings in
7973 <file:drivers/scsi/aha1740.h>.
7975 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
7976 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
7977 The module will be called aha1740.o. If you want to compile it as a
7978 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
7980 Adaptec AIC7xxx support
7981 CONFIG_SCSI_AIC7XXX
7982 This driver supports all of Adaptec's Fast through Ultra 160 PCI
7983 based SCSI controllers as well as the aic7770 based EISA and VLB
7984 SCSI controllers (the 274x and 284x series). For AAA and ARO based
7985 configurations, only SCSI functionality is provided.
7987 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
7988 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
7989 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
7990 will be called aic7xxx.o.
7992 Maximum number of TCQ commands per device
7993 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_CMDS_PER_DEVICE
7994 Specify the number of commands you would like to allocate per SCSI
7995 device when Tagged Command Queueing (TCQ) is enabled on that device.
7997 This is an upper bound value for the number of tagged transactions
7998 to be used for any device. The aic7xxx driver will automatically
7999 vary this number based on device behavior. For devices with a
8000 fixed maximum, the driver will eventually lock to this maximum
8001 and display a console message indicating this value.
8003 Due to resource allocation issues in the Linux SCSI mid-layer, using
8004 a high number of commands per device may result in memory allocation
8005 failures when many devices are attached to the system. For this reason,
8006 the default is set to 32. Higher values may result in higer performance
8007 on some devices. The upper bound is 253. 0 disables tagged queueing.
8009 Per device tag depth can be controlled via the kernel command line
8010 "tag_info" option. See drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/README.aic7xxx
8011 for details.
8013 Default: 32
8015 Initial bus reset delay in milli-seconds
8016 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_RESET_DELAY_MS
8017 The number of milliseconds to delay after an initial bus reset.
8018 The bus settle delay following all error recovery actions is
8019 dictated by the SCSI layer and is not affected by this value.
8021 Default: 15000 (15 seconds)
8023 Probe for EISA and VL AIC7XXX Adapters
8024 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_PROBE_EISA_VL
8025 Probe for EISA and VLB Aic7xxx controllers. In many newer systems,
8026 the invasive probes necessary to detect these controllers can cause
8027 other devices to fail. For this reason, the non-PCI probe code is
8028 disabled by default. The current value of this option can be "toggled"
8029 via the no_probe kernel command line option.
8031 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_BUILD_FIRMWARE
8032 This option should only be enabled if you are modifying the firmware
8033 source to the aic7xxx driver and wish to have the generated firmware
8034 include files updated during a normal kernel build. The assembler
8035 for the firmware requires lex and yacc or their equivalents, as well
8036 as the db v1 library. You may have to install additional packages
8037 or modify the assembler Makefile or the files it includes if your
8038 build environment is different than that of the author.
8040 Compile in Debugging Code
8041 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_DEBUG_ENABLE
8042 Compile in aic7xxx debugging code that can be useful in diagnosing
8043 driver errors.
8045 Debug code enable mask (2048 for all debugging)
8046 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_DEBUG_MASK
8047 Bit mask of debug options that is only valid if the
8048 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_DEBUG_ENBLE option is enabled. The bits in this mask
8049 are defined in the drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx.h - search for the
8050 variable ahc_debug in that file to find them.
8052 Default: 0
8054 Decode registers during diagnostics
8055 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_REG_PRETTY_PRINT
8056 Compile in register value tables for the output of expanded register
8057 contents in diagnostics. This make it much easier to understand debug
8058 output without having to refer to a data book and/or the aic7xxx.reg file.
8060 Old Adaptec AIC7xxx support
8061 CONFIG_SCSI_AIC7XXX_OLD
8062 WARNING This driver is an older aic7xxx driver and is no longer
8063 under active development. Adaptec, Inc. is writing a new driver to
8064 take the place of this one, and it is recommended that whenever
8065 possible, people should use the new Adaptec written driver instead
8066 of this one. This driver will eventually be phased out entirely.
8068 This is support for the various aic7xxx based Adaptec SCSI
8069 controllers. These include the 274x EISA cards; 284x VLB cards;
8070 2902, 2910, 293x, 294x, 394x, 3985 and several other PCI and
8071 motherboard based SCSI controllers from Adaptec. It does not support
8072 the AAA-13x RAID controllers from Adaptec, nor will it likely ever
8073 support them. It does not support the 2920 cards from Adaptec that
8074 use the Future Domain SCSI controller chip. For those cards, you
8075 need the "Future Domain 16xx SCSI support" driver.
8077 In general, if the controller is based on an Adaptec SCSI controller
8078 chip from the aic777x series or the aic78xx series, this driver
8079 should work. The only exception is the 7810 which is specifically
8080 not supported (that's the RAID controller chip on the AAA-13x
8081 cards).
8083 Note that the AHA2920 SCSI host adapter is *not* supported by this
8084 driver; choose "Future Domain 16xx SCSI support" instead if you have
8085 one of those.
8087 Information on the configuration options for this controller can be
8088 found by checking the help file for each of the available
8089 configuration options. You should read
8090 <file:drivers/scsi/aic7xxx_old/README.aic7xxx> at a minimum before
8091 contacting the maintainer with any questions. The SCSI-HOWTO,
8092 available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, can also
8093 be of great help.
8095 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
8096 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8097 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8098 will be called aic7xxx_old.o.
8100 Enable tagged command queueing (TCQ) by default
8101 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_OLD_TCQ_ON_BY_DEFAULT
8102 This option causes the aic7xxx driver to attempt to use Tagged
8103 Command Queueing (TCQ) on all devices that claim to support it.
8105 TCQ is a feature of SCSI-2 which improves performance: the host
8106 adapter can send several SCSI commands to a device's queue even if
8107 previous commands haven't finished yet. Because the device is
8108 intelligent, it can optimize its operations (like head positioning)
8109 based on its own request queue. Not all devices implement this
8110 correctly.
8112 If you say Y here, you can still turn off TCQ on troublesome devices
8113 with the use of the tag_info boot parameter. See the file
8114 <file:drivers/scsi/README.aic7xxx> for more information on that and
8115 other aic7xxx setup commands. If this option is turned off, you may
8116 still enable TCQ on known good devices by use of the tag_info boot
8117 parameter.
8119 If you are unsure about your devices then it is safest to say N
8120 here.
8122 However, TCQ can increase performance on some hard drives by as much
8123 as 50% or more, so it is recommended that if you say N here, you
8124 should at least read the <file:drivers/scsi/README.aic7xxx> file so
8125 you will know how to enable this option manually should your drives
8126 prove to be safe in regards to TCQ.
8128 Conversely, certain drives are known to lock up or cause bus resets
8129 when TCQ is enabled on them. If you have a Western Digital
8130 Enterprise SCSI drive for instance, then don't even bother to enable
8131 TCQ on it as the drive will become unreliable, and it will actually
8132 reduce performance.
8134 Default number of TCQ commands per device
8135 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_OLD_CMDS_PER_DEVICE
8136 Specify the number of commands you would like to allocate per SCSI
8137 device when Tagged Command Queueing (TCQ) is enabled on that device.
8139 Reasonable figures are in the range of 8 to 24 commands per device,
8140 but depending on hardware could be increased or decreased from that
8141 figure. If the number is too high for any particular device, the
8142 driver will automatically compensate usually after only 10 minutes
8143 of uptime. It will not hinder performance if some of your devices
8144 eventually have their command depth reduced, but is a waste of
8145 memory if all of your devices end up reducing this number down to a
8146 more reasonable figure.
8148 NOTE: Certain very broken drives are known to lock up when given
8149 more commands than they like to deal with. Quantum Fireball drives
8150 are the most common in this category. For the Quantum Fireball
8151 drives it is suggested to use no more than 8 commands per device.
8153 Default: 8
8155 Collect statistics to report in /proc
8156 CONFIG_AIC7XXX_OLD_PROC_STATS
8157 This option tells the driver to keep track of how many commands have
8158 been sent to each particular device and report that information to
8159 the user via the /proc/scsi/aic7xxx/n file, where n is the number of
8160 the aic7xxx controller you want the information on. This adds a
8161 small amount of overhead to each and every SCSI command the aic7xxx
8162 driver handles, so if you aren't really interested in this
8163 information, it is best to leave it disabled. This will only work if
8164 you also say Y to "/proc file system support", below.
8166 If unsure, say N.
8168 CONFIG_SCSI_AIC79XX
8169 This driver supports all of Adaptec's Ultra 320 PCI-X based SCSI controllers.
8171 CONFIG_AIC79XX_CMDS_PER_DEVICE 32
8172 Specify the number of commands you would like to allocate per SCSI
8173 device when Tagged Command Queueing (TCQ) is enabled on that device.
8175 This is an upper bound value for the number of tagged transactions
8176 to be used for any device. The aic7xxx driver will automatically
8177 vary this number based on device behavior. For devices with a
8178 fixed maximum, the driver will eventually lock to this maximum
8179 and display a console message indicating this value.
8181 Due to resource allocation issues in the Linux SCSI mid-layer, using
8182 a high number of commands per device may result in memory allocation
8183 failures when many devices are attached to the system. For this reason,
8184 the default is set to 32. Higher values may result in higer performance
8185 on some devices. The upper bound is 253.
8187 Per device tag depth can be controlled via the kernel command line
8188 "tag_info" option. See drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/README.aic79xx
8189 for details.
8191 Default: 32
8193 CONFIG_AIC79XX_RESET_DELAY_MS 15000
8194 The number of milliseconds to delay after an initial bus reset.
8195 The bus settle delay following all error recovery actions is
8196 dictated by the SCSI layer and is not affected by this value.
8198 Default: 15000 (15 seconds)
8200 CONFIG_AIC79XX_BUILD_FIRMWARE
8201 This option should only be enabled if you are modifying the firmware
8202 source to the aic7xxx driver and wish to have the generated firmware
8203 include files updated during a normal kernel build. The assembler
8204 for the firmware requires lex and yacc or their equivalents, as well
8205 as the db v1 library. You may have to install additional packages
8206 or modify the assembler Makefile or the files it includes if your
8207 build environment is different than that of the author.
8209 CONFIG_AIC79XX_ENABLE_RD_STRM
8210 Read Streaming is a U320 protocol option that should enhance performance.
8211 Early U320 drive firmware actually performs slower with read streaming
8212 enabled so it is disabled by default. Read Streaming can be configured
8213 in much the same way as tagged queueing using the "rd_strm" command line
8214 option. See drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/README.aic79xx for details.
8216 CONFIG_AIC79XX_DEBUG_ENABLE
8217 Compile in aic79xx debugging code that can be useful in diagnosing
8218 driver errors.
8220 CONFIG_AIC79XX_DEBUG_MASK
8221 Bit mask of debug options that is only valid if the
8222 CONFIG_AIC79XX_DEBUG_ENBLE option is enabled. The bits in this mask
8223 are defined in the drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx.h - search for the
8224 variable ahd_debug in that file to find them.
8226 Default: 0
8228 CONFIG_AIC79XX_REG_PRETTY_PRINT
8229 Compile in register value tables for the output of expanded register
8230 contents in diagnostics. This make it much easier to understand debug
8231 output without having to refer to a data book and/or the aic7xxx.reg file.
8233 Adaptec I2O RAID support
8234 CONFIG_SCSI_DPT_I2O
8235 This driver supports all of Adaptec's I2O based RAID controllers as
8236 well as the DPT SmartRaid V cards. This is an Adaptec maintained
8237 driver by Deanna Bonds. See <file:drivers/scsi/README.dpti>.
8239 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8240 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8241 If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
8242 <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
8243 dpt_i2o.o.
8245 IBM ServeRAID support
8246 CONFIG_SCSI_IPS
8247 This is support for the IBM ServeRAID hardware RAID controllers.
8248 See <http://www.developer.ibm.com/welcome/netfinity/serveraid.html>
8249 for more information. If this driver does not work correctly
8250 without modification please contact the author by email at
8251 ipslinux@us.ibm.com.
8253 You can build this driver as a module ( = code which can be
8254 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8255 but only a single instance may be loaded. If you want to compile it
8256 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8257 The module will be called ips.o.
8259 BusLogic SCSI support
8260 CONFIG_SCSI_BUSLOGIC
8261 This is support for BusLogic MultiMaster and FlashPoint SCSI Host
8262 Adapters. Consult the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8263 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, and the files
8264 <file:drivers/scsi/README.BusLogic> and
8265 <file:drivers/scsi/README.FlashPoint> for more information. If this
8266 driver does not work correctly without modification, please contact
8267 the author, Leonard N. Zubkoff, by email to lnz@dandelion.com.
8269 You can also build this driver as a module ( = code which can be
8270 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8271 but only a single instance may be loaded. If you want to compile it
8272 as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8273 The module will be called BusLogic.o.
8275 Omit BusLogic SCSI FlashPoint support
8276 CONFIG_SCSI_OMIT_FLASHPOINT
8277 This option allows you to omit the FlashPoint support from the
8278 BusLogic SCSI driver. The FlashPoint SCCB Manager code is
8279 substantial, so users of MultiMaster Host Adapters may wish to omit
8280 it.
8282 Compaq Fibre Channel 64-bit/66Mhz HBA support
8283 CONFIG_SCSI_CPQFCTS
8284 Say Y here to compile in support for the Compaq StorageWorks Fibre
8285 Channel 64-bit/66Mhz Host Bus Adapter.
8287 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
8288 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8289 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8290 will be called cpqfc.o.
8292 DMX3191D SCSI support
8293 CONFIG_SCSI_DMX3191D
8294 This is support for Domex DMX3191D SCSI Host Adapters.
8296 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8297 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8298 The module will be called dmx3191d.o. If you want to compile it as
8299 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8301 DTC3180/3280 SCSI support
8302 CONFIG_SCSI_DTC3280
8303 This is support for DTC 3180/3280 SCSI Host Adapters. Please read
8304 the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8305 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, and the file
8306 <file:drivers/scsi/README.dtc3x80>.
8308 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8309 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8310 The module will be called dtc.o. If you want to compile it as a
8311 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8313 EATA-DMA [Obsolete] (DPT, NEC, AT&T, SNI, AST, Olivetti, Alphatronix) support
8314 CONFIG_SCSI_EATA_DMA
8315 This is support for the EATA-DMA protocol compliant SCSI Host
8316 Adapters like the SmartCache III/IV, SmartRAID controller families
8317 and the DPT PM2011B and PM2012B controllers.
8319 Note that this driver is obsolete; if you have one of the above
8320 SCSI Host Adapters, you should normally say N here and Y to "EATA
8321 ISA/EISA/PCI support", below. Please read the SCSI-HOWTO, available
8322 from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8324 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8325 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8326 The module will be called eata_dma.o. If you want to compile it as
8327 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8329 EATA-PIO (old DPT PM2001, PM2012A) support
8330 CONFIG_SCSI_EATA_PIO
8331 This driver supports all EATA-PIO protocol compliant SCSI Host
8332 Adapters like the DPT PM2001 and the PM2012A. EATA-DMA compliant
8333 host adapters could also use this driver but are discouraged from
8334 doing so, since this driver only supports hard disks and lacks
8335 numerous features. You might want to have a look at the SCSI-HOWTO,
8336 available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8338 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
8339 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8340 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8341 will be called eata_pio.o.
8343 UltraStor 14F/34F support
8344 CONFIG_SCSI_U14_34F
8345 This is support for the UltraStor 14F and 34F SCSI-2 host adapters.
8346 The source at <file:drivers/scsi/u14-34f.c> contains some
8347 information about this hardware. If the driver doesn't work out of
8348 the box, you may have to change some settings in
8349 <file: drivers/scsi/u14-34f.c>. Read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8350 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Note that there is also
8351 another driver for the same hardware: "UltraStor SCSI support",
8352 below. You should say Y to both only if you want 24F support as
8353 well.
8355 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8356 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8357 The module will be called u14-34f.o. If you want to compile it as a
8358 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8360 enable elevator sorting
8361 CONFIG_SCSI_U14_34F_LINKED_COMMANDS
8362 This option enables elevator sorting for all probed SCSI disks and
8363 CD-ROMs. It definitely reduces the average seek distance when doing
8364 random seeks, but this does not necessarily result in a noticeable
8365 performance improvement: your mileage may vary...
8367 The safe answer is N.
8369 maximum number of queued commands
8370 CONFIG_SCSI_U14_34F_MAX_TAGS
8371 This specifies how many SCSI commands can be maximally queued for
8372 each probed SCSI device. You should reduce the default value of 8
8373 only if you have disks with buggy or limited tagged command support.
8374 Minimum is 2 and maximum is 14. This value is also the window size
8375 used by the elevator sorting option above. The effective value used
8376 by the driver for each probed SCSI device is reported at boot time.
8378 Future Domain 16xx SCSI/AHA-2920A support
8379 CONFIG_SCSI_FUTURE_DOMAIN
8380 This is support for Future Domain's 16-bit SCSI host adapters
8381 (TMC-1660/1680, TMC-1650/1670, TMC-3260, TMC-1610M/MER/MEX) and
8382 other adapters based on the Future Domain chipsets (Quantum
8383 ISA-200S, ISA-250MG; Adaptec AHA-2920A; and at least one IBM board).
8384 It is explained in section 3.7 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8385 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8387 NOTE: Newer Adaptec AHA-2920C boards use the Adaptec AIC-7850 chip
8388 and should use the aic7xxx driver ("Adaptec AIC7xxx chipset SCSI
8389 controller support"). This Future Domain driver works with the older
8390 Adaptec AHA-2920A boards with a Future Domain chip on them.
8392 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8393 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8394 The module will be called fdomain.o. If you want to compile it as a
8395 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8397 Future Domain MCS-600/700 SCSI support
8398 CONFIG_SCSI_FD_MCS
8399 This is support for Future Domain MCS 600/700 MCA SCSI adapters.
8400 Some PS/2 computers are equipped with IBM Fast SCSI Adapter/A which
8401 is identical to the MCS 700 and hence also supported by this driver.
8402 This driver also supports the Reply SB16/SCSI card (the SCSI part).
8403 It supports multiple adapters in the same system.
8405 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8406 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8407 The module will be called fd_mcs.o. If you want to compile it as a
8408 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8410 Generic NCR5380/53c400 SCSI support
8411 CONFIG_SCSI_GENERIC_NCR5380
8412 This is the generic NCR family of SCSI controllers, not to be
8413 confused with the NCR 53c7 or 8xx controllers. It is explained in
8414 section 3.8 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8415 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. If it doesn't work out
8416 of the box, you may have to change some settings in
8417 <file:drivers/scsi/g_NCR5380.h>.
8419 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8420 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8421 The module will be called g_NCR5380.o. If you want to compile it as
8422 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8424 Enable NCR53c400 extensions
8425 CONFIG_SCSI_GENERIC_NCR53C400
8426 This enables certain optimizations for the NCR53c400 SCSI cards.
8427 You might as well try it out. Note that this driver will only probe
8428 for the Trantor T130B in its default configuration; you might have
8429 to pass a command line option to the kernel at boot time if it does
8430 not detect your card. See the file
8431 <file:drivers/scsi/README.g_NCR5380> for details.
8433 # Choice: ncr5380
8434 NCR5380/53c400 mapping method (use Port for T130B)
8435 CONFIG_SCSI_G_NCR5380_PORT
8436 The NCR5380 and NCR53c400 SCSI controllers come in two varieties:
8437 port or memory mapped. You should know what you have. The most
8438 common card, Trantor T130B, uses port mapped mode.
8440 NCR Dual 700 MCA SCSI support
8441 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR_D700
8442 This is a driver for the MicroChannel Dual 700 card produced by
8443 NCR and commonly used in 345x/35xx/4100 class machines. It always
8444 tries to negotiate sync and uses tag command queueing.
8446 Unless you have an NCR manufactured machine, the chances are that
8447 you do not have this SCSI card, so say N.
8449 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
8450 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8451 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8452 will be called NCR_D700.o.
8454 HP LASI SCSI support for 53c700/710
8455 CONFIG_SCSI_LASI700
8456 This is a driver for the lasi baseboard in some parisc machines
8457 which is based on the 53c700 chip. Will also support LASI subsystems
8458 based on the 710 chip using 700 emulation mode.
8460 Unless you know you have a 53c700 or 53c710 based lasi, say N here
8462 NCR53c7,8xx SCSI support
8463 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C7xx
8464 This is a driver for the 53c7 and 8xx NCR family of SCSI
8465 controllers, not to be confused with the NCR 5380 controllers. It
8466 is explained in section 3.8 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8467 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. If it doesn't work out
8468 of the box, you may have to change some settings in
8469 <file:drivers/scsi/53c7,8xx.h>. Please read
8470 <file:drivers/scsi/README.ncr53c7xx> for the available boot time
8471 command line options.
8473 Note: there is another driver for the 53c8xx family of controllers
8474 ("NCR53C8XX SCSI support" below). If you want to use them both, you
8475 need to say M to both and build them as modules, but only one may be
8476 active at a time. If you have a 53c8xx board, it's better to use the
8477 other driver.
8479 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8480 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8481 The module will be called 53c7,8xx.o. If you want to compile it as
8482 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8484 Always negotiate synchronous transfers
8485 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C7xx_sync
8486 In general, this is good; however, it is a bit dangerous since there
8487 are some broken SCSI devices out there. Take your chances. Safe bet
8488 is N.
8490 Allow FAST-SCSI [10MHz]
8491 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C7xx_FAST
8492 This will enable 10MHz FAST-SCSI transfers with your host
8493 adapter. Some systems have problems with that speed, so it's safest
8494 to say N here.
8496 Allow DISCONNECT
8497 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C7xx_DISCONNECT
8498 This enables the disconnect/reconnect feature of the NCR SCSI
8499 controller. When you say Y here, a slow SCSI device will not lock
8500 the SCSI bus while processing a request, allowing simultaneous use
8501 of e.g. a SCSI hard disk and SCSI tape or CD-ROM drive, and
8502 providing much better performance when using slow and fast SCSI
8503 devices at the same time. Some devices, however, do not operate
8504 properly with this option enabled, and will cause your SCSI system
8505 to hang, which might cause a system crash. The safe answer
8506 therefore is to say N.
8508 SYM53C8XX Version 2 SCSI support
8509 CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX_2
8510 This driver supports the whole NCR53C8XX/SYM53C8XX family of
8511 PCI-SCSI controllers. It also supports the subset of LSI53C10XX
8512 Ultra-160 controllers that are based on the SYM53C8XX SCRIPTS
8513 language. It does not support LSI53C10XX Ultra-320 PCI-X SCSI
8514 controllers.
8516 If your system has problems using this new major version of the
8517 SYM53C8XX driver, you may switch back to driver version 1.
8519 Please read <file:drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/Documentation.txt> for more
8520 information.
8522 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
8523 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8524 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8525 will be called sym53c8xx_2.o.
8527 PCI DMA addressing mode
8528 CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX_DMA_ADDRESSING_MODE
8529 This option only applies to PCI-SCSI chip that are PCI DAC capable
8530 (875A, 895A, 896, 1010-33, 1010-66, 1000).
8532 When set to 0, only PCI 32 bit DMA addressing (SAC) will be performed.
8533 When set to 1, 40 bit DMA addressing (with upper 24 bits of address
8534 set to zero) is supported. The addressable range is here 1 TB.
8535 When set to 2, full 64 bits of address for DMA are supported, but only
8536 16 segments of 4 GB can be addressed. The addressable range is so
8537 limited to 64 GB.
8539 The safest value is 0 (32 bit DMA addressing) that is guessed to still
8540 fit most of real machines.
8542 The preferred value 1 (40 bit DMA addressing) should make happy
8543 properly engineered PCI DAC capable host bridges. You may configure
8544 this option for Intel platforms with more than 4 GB of memory.
8546 The still experimental value 2 (64 bit DMA addressing with 16 x 4GB
8547 segments limitation) can be used on systems that require PCI address
8548 bits past bit 39 to be set for the addressing of memory using PCI
8549 DAC cycles.
8551 use normal IO
8552 CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX_IOMAPPED
8553 If you say Y here, the driver will preferently use normal IO rather than
8554 memory mapped IO.
8556 maximum number of queued commands
8557 CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX_MAX_TAGS
8558 This option allows you to specify the maximum number of commands
8559 that can be queued to any device, when tagged command queuing is
8560 possible. The driver supports up to 256 queued commands per device.
8561 This value is used as a compiled-in hard limit.
8563 default tagged command queue depth
8564 CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX_DEFAULT_TAGS
8565 This is the default value of the command queue depth the driver will
8566 announce to the generic SCSI layer for devices that support tagged
8567 command queueing. This value can be changed from the boot command line.
8568 This is a soft limit that cannot exceed CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX_MAX_TAGS.
8570 NCR53C8XX SCSI support
8571 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX
8572 This is the BSD ncr driver adapted to Linux for the NCR53C8XX family
8573 of PCI-SCSI controllers. This driver supports parity checking,
8574 tagged command queuing and fast synchronous data transfers up to 80
8575 MB/s with wide FAST-40 LVD devices and controllers.
8577 Recent versions of the 53C8XX chips are better supported by the
8578 option "SYM53C8XX SCSI support", below.
8580 Note: there is yet another driver for the 53c8xx family of
8581 controllers ("NCR53c7,8xx SCSI support" above). If you want to use
8582 them both, you need to say M to both and build them as modules, but
8583 only one may be active at a time. If you have a 53c8xx board, you
8584 probably do not want to use the "NCR53c7,8xx SCSI support".
8586 Please read <file:drivers/scsi/README.ncr53c8xx> for more
8587 information.
8589 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
8590 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8591 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8592 will be called ncr53c8xx.o.
8594 SYM53C8XX Version 1 SCSI support
8595 CONFIG_SCSI_SYM53C8XX
8596 This driver supports all the features of recent 53C8XX chips (used
8597 in PCI SCSI controllers), notably the hardware phase mismatch
8598 feature of the SYM53C896.
8600 Older versions of the 53C8XX chips are not supported by this
8601 driver. If your system uses either a 810 rev. < 16, a 815, or a 825
8602 rev. < 16 PCI SCSI processor, you must use the generic NCR53C8XX
8603 driver ("NCR53C8XX SCSI support" above) or configure both the
8604 NCR53C8XX and this SYM53C8XX drivers either as module or linked to
8605 the kernel image.
8607 When both drivers are linked into the kernel, the SYM53C8XX driver
8608 is called first at initialization and you can use the 'excl=ioaddr'
8609 driver boot option to exclude attachment of adapters by the
8610 SYM53C8XX driver. For example, entering
8611 'sym53c8xx=excl:0xb400,excl=0xc000' at the lilo prompt prevents
8612 adapters at io address 0xb400 and 0xc000 from being attached by the
8613 SYM53C8XX driver, thus allowing the NCR53C8XX driver to attach them.
8614 The 'excl' option is also supported by the NCR53C8XX driver.
8616 Please read <file:drivers/scsi/README.ncr53c8xx> for more
8617 information.
8619 If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
8620 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8621 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8622 will be called sym53c8xx.o.
8624 Synchronous transfer frequency in MHz
8625 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_SYNC
8626 The SCSI Parallel Interface-2 Standard defines 5 classes of transfer
8627 rates: FAST-5, FAST-10, FAST-20, FAST-40 and FAST-80. The numbers
8628 are respectively the maximum data transfer rates in mega-transfers
8629 per second for each class. For example, a FAST-20 Wide 16 device is
8630 able to transfer data at 20 million 16 bit packets per second for a
8631 total rate of 40 MB/s.
8633 You may specify 0 if you want to only use asynchronous data
8634 transfers. This is the safest and slowest option. Otherwise, specify
8635 a value between 5 and 80, depending on the capability of your SCSI
8636 controller. The higher the number, the faster the data transfer.
8637 Note that 80 should normally be ok since the driver decreases the
8638 value automatically according to the controller's capabilities.
8640 Your answer to this question is ignored for controllers with NVRAM,
8641 since the driver will get this information from the user set-up. It
8642 also can be overridden using a boot setup option, as follows
8643 (example): 'ncr53c8xx=sync:12' will allow the driver to negotiate
8644 for FAST-20 synchronous data transfer (20 mega-transfers per
8645 second).
8647 The normal answer therefore is not to go with the default but to
8648 select the maximum value 80 allowing the driver to use the maximum
8649 value supported by each controller. If this causes problems with
8650 your SCSI devices, you should come back and decrease the value.
8652 There is no safe option other than using good cabling, right
8653 terminations and SCSI conformant devices.
8655 Use normal IO
8656 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_IOMAPPED
8657 If you say Y here, the driver will use normal IO, as opposed to
8658 memory mapped IO. Memory mapped IO has less latency than normal IO
8659 and works for most Intel-based hardware. Under Linux/Alpha only
8660 normal IO is currently supported by the driver and so, this option
8661 has no effect on those systems.
8663 The normal answer therefore is N; try Y only if you encounter SCSI
8664 related problems.
8666 Not allow targets to disconnect
8667 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_NO_DISCONNECT
8668 This option is only provided for safety if you suspect some SCSI
8669 device of yours to not support properly the target-disconnect
8670 feature. In that case, you would say Y here. In general however, to
8671 not allow targets to disconnect is not reasonable if there is more
8672 than 1 device on a SCSI bus. The normal answer therefore is N.
8674 Default tagged command queue depth
8675 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_DEFAULT_TAGS
8676 "Tagged command queuing" is a feature of SCSI-2 which improves
8677 performance: the host adapter can send several SCSI commands to a
8678 device's queue even if previous commands haven't finished yet.
8679 Because the device is intelligent, it can optimize its operations
8680 (like head positioning) based on its own request queue. Some SCSI
8681 devices don't implement this properly; if you want to disable this
8682 feature, enter 0 or 1 here (it doesn't matter which).
8684 The default value is 8 and should be supported by most hard disks.
8685 This value can be overridden from the boot command line using the
8686 'tags' option as follows (example):
8687 'ncr53c8xx=tags:4/t2t3q16/t0u2q10' will set default queue depth to
8688 4, set queue depth to 16 for target 2 and target 3 on controller 0
8689 and set queue depth to 10 for target 0 / lun 2 on controller 1.
8691 The normal answer therefore is to go with the default 8 and to use
8692 a boot command line option for devices that need to use a different
8693 command queue depth.
8695 There is no safe option other than using good SCSI devices.
8697 Maximum number of queued commands
8698 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_MAX_TAGS
8699 This option allows you to specify the maximum number of commands
8700 that can be queued to any device, when tagged command queuing is
8701 possible. The default value is 32. Minimum is 2, maximum is 64.
8702 Modern hard disks are able to support 64 tags and even more, but
8703 do not seem to be faster when more than 32 tags are being used.
8705 So, the normal answer here is to go with the default value 32 unless
8706 you are using very large hard disks with large cache (>= 1 MB) that
8707 are able to take advantage of more than 32 tagged commands.
8709 There is no safe option and the default answer is recommended.
8711 Assume boards are SYMBIOS compatible
8712 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_SYMBIOS_COMPAT
8713 This option allows you to enable some features depending on GPIO
8714 wiring. These General Purpose Input/Output pins can be used for
8715 vendor specific features or implementation of the standard SYMBIOS
8716 features. Genuine SYMBIOS controllers use GPIO0 in output for
8717 controller LED and GPIO3 bit as a flag indicating
8718 singled-ended/differential interface. The Tekram DC-390U/F boards
8719 uses a different GPIO wiring.
8721 Your answer to this question is ignored if all your controllers have
8722 NVRAM, since the driver is able to detect the board type from the
8723 NVRAM format.
8725 If all the controllers in your system are genuine SYMBIOS boards or
8726 use BIOS and drivers from SYMBIOS, you would want to say Y here,
8727 otherwise N. N is the safe answer.
8729 Enable traffic profiling
8730 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_PROFILE
8731 This option allows you to enable profiling information gathering.
8732 These statistics are not very accurate due to the low frequency
8733 of the kernel clock (100 Hz on i386) and have performance impact
8734 on systems that use very fast devices.
8736 The normal answer therefore is N.
8738 Include support for the NCR PQS/PDS SCSI card
8739 CONFIG_SCSI_NCR53C8XX_PQS_PDS
8740 Say Y here if you have a special SCSI adapter produced by NCR
8741 corporation called a PCI Quad SCSI or PCI Dual SCSI. You do not need
8742 this if you do not have one of these adapters. However, since this
8743 device is detected as a specific PCI device, this option is quite
8744 safe.
8746 The common answer here is N, but answering Y is safe.
8748 Workbit NinjaSCSI-32Bi/UDE support
8749 CONFIG_SCSI_NSP32
8750 This is support for the Workbit NinjaSCSI-32Bi/UDE PCI/Cardbus
8751 SCSI host adapter. Please read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8752 <http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto>.
8754 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
8755 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8756 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8757 will be called nsp32.o.
8759 IBMMCA SCSI support
8760 CONFIG_SCSI_IBMMCA
8761 This is support for the IBM SCSI adapter found in many of the PS/2
8762 series computers. These machines have an MCA bus, so you need to
8763 answer Y to "MCA support" as well and read
8764 <file:Documentation/mca.txt>.
8766 If the adapter isn't found during boot (a common problem for models
8767 56, 57, 76, and 77) you'll need to use the 'ibmmcascsi=<pun>' kernel
8768 option, where <pun> is the id of the SCSI subsystem (usually 7, but
8769 if that doesn't work check your reference diskette). Owners of
8770 model 95 with a LED-matrix-display can in addition activate some
8771 activity info like under OS/2, but more informative, by setting
8772 'ibmmcascsi=display' as an additional kernel parameter. Try "man
8773 bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader about how to
8774 pass options to the kernel.
8776 If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
8777 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8778 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8779 will be called ibmmca.o.
8781 Standard SCSI-order
8782 CONFIG_IBMMCA_SCSI_ORDER_STANDARD
8783 In the PC-world and in most modern SCSI-BIOS-setups, SCSI-hard disks
8784 are assigned to the drive letters, starting with the lowest SCSI-id
8785 (physical number -- pun) to be drive C:, as seen from DOS and
8786 similar operating systems. When looking into papers describing the
8787 ANSI-SCSI-standard, this assignment of drives appears to be wrong.
8788 The SCSI-standard follows a hardware-hierarchy which says that id 7
8789 has the highest priority and id 0 the lowest. Therefore, the host
8790 adapters are still today everywhere placed as SCSI-id 7 by default.
8791 In the SCSI-standard, the drive letters express the priority of the
8792 disk. C: should be the hard disk, or a partition on it, with the
8793 highest priority. This must therefore be the disk with the highest
8794 SCSI-id (e.g. 6) and not the one with the lowest! IBM-BIOS kept the
8795 original definition of the SCSI-standard as also industrial- and
8796 process-control-machines, like VME-CPUs running under realtime-OSes
8797 (e.g. LynxOS, OS9) do.
8799 If you like to run Linux on your MCA-machine with the same
8800 assignment of hard disks as seen from e.g. DOS or OS/2 on your
8801 machine, which is in addition conformant to the SCSI-standard, you
8802 must say Y here. This is also necessary for MCA-Linux users who want
8803 to keep downward compatibility to older releases of the
8804 IBM-MCA-SCSI-driver (older than driver-release 2.00 and older than
8805 June 1997).
8807 If you like to have the lowest SCSI-id assigned as drive C:, as
8808 modern SCSI-BIOSes do, which does not conform to the standard, but
8809 is widespread and common in the PC-world of today, you must say N
8810 here. If unsure, say Y.
8812 Reset SCSI-devices at boot time
8813 CONFIG_IBMMCA_SCSI_DEV_RESET
8814 By default, SCSI-devices are reset when the machine is powered on.
8815 However, some devices exist, like special-control-devices,
8816 SCSI-CNC-machines, SCSI-printer or scanners of older type, that do
8817 not reset when switched on. If you say Y here, each device connected
8818 to your SCSI-bus will be issued a reset-command after it has been
8819 probed, while the kernel is booting. This may cause problems with
8820 more modern devices, like hard disks, which do not appreciate these
8821 reset commands, and can cause your system to hang. So say Y only if
8822 you know that one of your older devices needs it; N is the safe
8823 answer.
8825 NCR MCA 53C9x SCSI support
8826 CONFIG_SCSI_MCA_53C9X
8827 Some MicroChannel machines, notably the NCR 35xx line, use a SCSI
8828 controller based on the NCR 53C94. This driver will allow use of
8829 the controller on the 3550, and very possibly others.
8831 If you want to compile this as a module (= code which can be
8832 inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say
8833 M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will
8834 be called mca_53c9x.o.
8836 Always IN2000 SCSI support
8837 CONFIG_SCSI_IN2000
8838 This is support for an ISA bus SCSI host adapter. You'll find more
8839 information in <file:drivers/scsi/README.in2000>. If it doesn't work
8840 out of the box, you may have to change the jumpers for IRQ or
8841 address selection.
8843 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
8844 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8845 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8846 will be called in2000.o.
8848 Initio 91XXU(W) SCSI support
8849 CONFIG_SCSI_INITIO
8850 This is support for the Initio 91XXU(W) SCSI host adapter. Please
8851 read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8852 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8854 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
8855 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8856 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8857 will be called initio.o.
8859 PAS16 SCSI support
8860 CONFIG_SCSI_PAS16
8861 This is support for a SCSI host adapter. It is explained in section
8862 3.10 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8863 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. If it doesn't work out
8864 of the box, you may have to change some settings in
8865 <file:drivers/scsi/pas16.h>.
8867 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8868 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8869 The module will be called pas16.o. If you want to compile it as a
8870 module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8872 Initio INI-A100U2W SCSI support
8873 CONFIG_SCSI_INIA100
8874 This is support for the Initio INI-A100U2W SCSI host adapter.
8875 Please read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8876 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8878 If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
8879 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
8880 say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
8881 will be called a100u2w.o.
8883 PCI2000 support
8884 CONFIG_SCSI_PCI2000
8885 This is support for the PCI2000I EIDE interface card which acts as a
8886 SCSI host adapter. Please read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8887 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8889 This driver is also available as a module called pci2000.o ( = code
8890 which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
8891 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
8892 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8894 PCI2220i support
8895 CONFIG_SCSI_PCI2220I
8896 This is support for the PCI2220i EIDE interface card which acts as a
8897 SCSI host adapter. Please read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8898 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8900 This driver is also available as a module called pci2220i.o ( = code
8901 which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
8902 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
8903 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8905 PSI240i support
8906 CONFIG_SCSI_PSI240I
8907 This is support for the PSI240i EIDE interface card which acts as a
8908 SCSI host adapter. Please read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8909 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8911 This driver is also available as a module called psi240i.o ( = code
8912 which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
8913 whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
8914 here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8916 Qlogic FAS SCSI support
8917 CONFIG_SCSI_QLOGIC_FAS
8918 This is a driver for the ISA, VLB, and PCMCIA versions of the Qlogic
8919 FastSCSI! cards as well as any other card based on the FASXX chip
8920 (including the Control Concepts SCSI/IDE/SIO/PIO/FDC cards).
8922 This driver does NOT support the PCI versions of these cards. The
8923 PCI versions are supported by the Qlogic ISP driver ("Qlogic ISP
8924 SCSI support"), below.
8926 Information about this driver is contained in
8927 <file:drivers/scsi/README.qlogicfas>. You should also read the
8928 SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8929 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8931 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8932 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8933 The module will be called qlogicfas.o. If you want to compile it as
8934 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8936 Qlogic ISP SCSI support
8937 CONFIG_SCSI_QLOGIC_ISP
8938 This driver works for all QLogic PCI SCSI host adapters (IQ-PCI,
8939 IQ-PCI-10, IQ_PCI-D) except for the PCI-basic card. (This latter
8940 card is supported by the "AM53/79C974 PCI SCSI" driver.)
8942 If you say Y here, make sure to choose "BIOS" at the question "PCI
8943 access mode".
8945 Please read the file <file:drivers/scsi/README.qlogicisp>. You
8946 should also read the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
8947 <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
8949 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8950 inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
8951 The module will be called qlogicisp.o. If you want to compile it as
8952 a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
8954 Qlogic ISP FC SCSI support
8955 CONFIG_SCSI_QLOGIC_FC
8956 This is a driver for the QLogic ISP2100 SCSI-FCP host adapter.
8958 This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
8959 inserted in and removed from the running