direct-io.hg

changeset 2790:47b3f6702111

bitkeeper revision 1.1159.142.5 (4184ecc0vBKFai_V2VmZuFFo-vJjwQ)

doc tweaks
author kaf24@freefall.cl.cam.ac.uk
date Sun Oct 31 13:46:40 2004 +0000 (2004-10-31)
parents b914ff7d73b5
children 021cfd38c6f9
files docs/src/user.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/src/user.tex	Sun Oct 31 09:56:36 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/docs/src/user.tex	Sun Oct 31 13:46:40 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -1,7 +1,6 @@
     1.4  \documentclass[11pt,twoside,final,openright]{xenstyle}
     1.5  \usepackage{a4,graphicx,setspace,times}
     1.6  \setstretch{1.15}
     1.7 -%\input{style.tex}
     1.8  
     1.9  \begin{document}
    1.10  
    1.11 @@ -90,11 +89,6 @@ We expect that Xen support will ultimate
    1.12  official releases of Linux, NetBSD, FreeBSD and Dragonfly BSD. 
    1.13  Other OS ports, including Plan 9, are in progress.
    1.14  
    1.15 -%Even running multiple copies of Linux can be very useful, providing a
    1.16 -%means of containing faults to one OS image, providing performance
    1.17 -%isolation between the various OS instances and trying out multiple
    1.18 -%distros.
    1.19 -
    1.20  Possible usage scenarios for Xen include:
    1.21  \begin{description}
    1.22  \item [Kernel development.] Test and debug kernel modifications in a
    1.23 @@ -194,14 +188,13 @@ scenarios on multiple sites.
    1.24  
    1.25  Xen 2.0 feature greatly enhanced hardware support, configuration
    1.26  flexibility, usability and a larger complement of supported operating
    1.27 -systems. We think that Xen has the potential to become {\em the}
    1.28 -definitive open source virtualisation solution and will work to
    1.29 -conclusively achieve that position.
    1.30 +systems. This latest release takes Xen a step closer to becoming the 
    1.31 +definitive open source solution for virtualisation.
    1.32  
    1.33  \chapter{Installation}
    1.34  
    1.35  The Xen distribution includes three main components:  Xen itself,
    1.36 -utilities to convert a standard Linux tree to run on Xen and the
    1.37 +utilities to convert a standard Linux tree to run on Xen, and the
    1.38  userspace tools required to operate a Xen-based system.
    1.39  
    1.40  This manual describes how to install the Xen 2.0 distribution from
    1.41 @@ -310,8 +303,8 @@ following:
    1.42  
    1.43  Inspect the Makefile if you want to see what goes on during a build.
    1.44  Building Xen and the tools is straightforward, but XenLinux is more
    1.45 -complicated.  The makefile needs a `pristine' Linux kernel tree which
    1.46 -it will then add the Xen architecture files to.  You can tell the
    1.47 +complicated.  The makefile needs a `pristine' Linux kernel tree to which
    1.48 +it will then add the Xen architecture files.  You can tell the
    1.49  makefile the location of the appropriate Linux compressed tar file by
    1.50  setting the LINUX\_SRC environment variable, e.g. \\
    1.51  \verb!# LINUX_SRC=/tmp/linux-2.6.8.1.tar.bz2 make world! \\ or by
    1.52 @@ -475,30 +468,36 @@ The first step in creating a new domain 
    1.53  filesystem for it to boot off.  Typically, this might be stored in a
    1.54  normal partition, an LVM or other volume manager partition, a disk
    1.55  file or on an NFS server.
    1.56 -
    1.57  A simple way to do this is simply to boot from your standard OS
    1.58  install CD and install the distribution into another partition on your
    1.59  hard drive.
    1.60  
    1.61 -{\em N.b } you can boot with Xen and XenLinux without installing any
    1.62 -special userspace tools but will need to have the prerequisites
    1.63 -described in Section~\ref{sec:prerequisites} and the Xen control tools
    1.64 -installed before you proceed.
    1.65 -
    1.66 -\section{From the web interface}
    1.67 +You can boot Xen and a single XenLinux instance without installing any
    1.68 +special user-space tools. To proceed further than this you will need
    1.69 +to install the prerequisites described in Section~\ref{sec:prerequisites}
    1.70 +and the Xen control tools. The control tools are installed by entering
    1.71 +the tools subdirectory of the repository and typing \\
    1.72 +\verb!# LINUX_SRC=/path/to/linux2.4/source make linux24! \\
    1.73  
    1.74 -Boot the Xen machine and start Xensv (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xensv} for
    1.75 -more details) using the command: \\
    1.76 -\verb_# xensv start_ \\
    1.77 -This will also start Xend (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xend} for more information).
    1.78 +To start the control daemon, type \\ \verb!# xend start! \\ If you
    1.79 +wish to start the daemon automatically, see the instructions in
    1.80 +Chapter~\ref{cha:xend}. Once the daemon is running, you can use the
    1.81 +{\tt xm} tool to monitor and maintain the domains running on your
    1.82 +system. This chapter provides only a brief tutorial: we provide full
    1.83 +details of the {\tt xm} tool in Chapter~\ref{cha:xm}. 
    1.84  
    1.85 -The domain management interface will then be available at {\tt
    1.86 -http://your\_machine:8080/}.  This provides a user friendly wizard for
    1.87 -starting domains and functions for managing running domains.
    1.88 -
    1.89 -\section{From the command line}
    1.90 -
    1.91 -Full details of the {\tt xm} tool are found in Chapter~\ref{cha:xm}.
    1.92 +%\section{From the web interface}
    1.93 +%
    1.94 +%Boot the Xen machine and start Xensv (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xensv} for
    1.95 +%more details) using the command: \\
    1.96 +%\verb_# xensv start_ \\
    1.97 +%This will also start Xend (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xend} for more information).
    1.98 +%
    1.99 +%The domain management interface will then be available at {\tt
   1.100 +%http://your\_machine:8080/}.  This provides a user friendly wizard for
   1.101 +%starting domains and functions for managing running domains.
   1.102 +%
   1.103 +%\section{From the command line}
   1.104  
   1.105  This example explains how to use the \path{xmdefconfig} file.  If you
   1.106  require a more complex setup, you will want to write a custom