ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 2819:5f6940f63507

bitkeeper revision 1.1159.1.330 (4186ecb1-tOKIfwXhrqmSHYZtnp2Mw)

Tweaks.
author mwilli2@equilibrium.research
date Tue Nov 02 02:10:57 2004 +0000 (2004-11-02)
parents fe33dd531fd0
children 583b600e8b21
files docs/src/user.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/src/user.tex	Tue Nov 02 01:26:40 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/docs/src/user.tex	Tue Nov 02 02:10:57 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -575,7 +575,7 @@ basics.
     1.4  \item Download the ttylinux disk image from XXX where from?
     1.5  \item Create a configuration file like the following:
     1.6  \begin{verbatim}
     1.7 -kernel = "/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.9-xenU" # or a 2.4 kernel or a xen0 kernel
     1.8 +kernel = "/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.9-xenU"
     1.9  memory = 64
    1.10  name = "ttylinux"
    1.11  cpu = -1 # leave to Xen to pick
    1.12 @@ -905,8 +905,6 @@ docs to do advanced stuff.
    1.13  \chapter{Domain Configuration Files}
    1.14  \label{cha:config}
    1.15  
    1.16 -XX Could use a little explanation about possible values
    1.17 -
    1.18  Xen configuration files contain the following standard variables.
    1.19  Unless otherwise stated, configuration items should be enclosed in
    1.20  quotes (i.e. {\tt '...'} or {\tt ``....''})):
    1.21 @@ -918,12 +916,16 @@ quotes (i.e. {\tt '...'} or {\tt ``....'
    1.22  \item[memory] Memory size in megabytes.
    1.23  \item[cpu] CPU to assign this domain to.
    1.24  \item[nics] Number of virtual network interfaces.
    1.25 -\item[vif] List of MAC addresses (random addresses are assigned if not given) and /
    1.26 -  or bridges to use for the domains network interfaces. e.g. \\
    1.27 -  \verb_vif = [ 'mac=aa:00:00:00:00:11, bridge=xen-br0', 'bridge=xen-br1' ]_
    1.28 -  to assign a MAC address and bridge to the first interface and assign a
    1.29 -  different bridge to the second interface, leaving Xend to choose the MAC
    1.30 -  address.
    1.31 +\item[vif] List of MAC addresses (random addresses are assigned if not
    1.32 +  given) and / or bridges to use for the domains network
    1.33 +  interfaces. e.g.
    1.34 +\begin{verbatim}
    1.35 +vif = [ 'mac=aa:00:00:00:00:11, bridge=xen-br0',
    1.36 +        'bridge=xen-br1' ]
    1.37 +\end{verbatim}
    1.38 +  to assign a MAC address and bridge to the first interface and assign
    1.39 +  a different bridge to the second interface, leaving Xend to choose
    1.40 +  the MAC address.
    1.41  \item[disk] List of block devices to export to the domain.  e.g. \\
    1.42    \verb_disk = [ 'phy:hda1,sda1,r' ]_ \\
    1.43    exports device \path{/dev/hda1} to the domain, as \path{/dev/sda1} with
    1.44 @@ -931,8 +933,9 @@ quotes (i.e. {\tt '...'} or {\tt ``....'
    1.45    \verb_disk = [ 'phy:hda7,sda2,w', 'phy:hdb2,sda,w!' ]_ \\
    1.46    exports device \path{/dev/hda7} to the domain as \path{/dev/sda2} with
    1.47    write access enabled and \path{/dev/hdb2} as \path{/dev/sda} with write access
    1.48 -  force enabled (bypassing safety checks).
    1.49 -\item[dhcp] Set to {\tt 'dhcp'} if you want to DHCP allocate the IP address.
    1.50 +  force enabled (bypassing safety checks, as indicated by the {\tt !}).
    1.51 +\item[dhcp] Set to {\tt 'dhcp'} if you want to DHCP allocate the IP
    1.52 +address.
    1.53  \item[netmask] IP netmask.
    1.54  \item[gateway] IP address for the gateway (if any).
    1.55  \item[hostname] Set the hostname for the virtual machine.
    1.56 @@ -949,10 +952,9 @@ quotes (i.e. {\tt '...'} or {\tt ``....'
    1.57    \end{description}
    1.58  \end{description}
    1.59  
    1.60 -It is also possible to include Python scripting commands in
    1.61 -configuration files.  This is done in the \path{xmdefconfig} file in
    1.62 -order to handle the {\tt vmid} variable.
    1.63 -
    1.64 +For additional flexibility, it is also possible to include Python
    1.65 +scripting commands in configuration files.  An example of this is the
    1.66 +\path{xmexample} file in order to handle the {\tt vmid} variable.
    1.67  
    1.68  \chapter{Xend (Node control daemon)}
    1.69  \label{cha:xend}
    1.70 @@ -970,6 +972,8 @@ Xend command line:
    1.71  \verb_# xend start_ & start Xend, if not already running \\
    1.72  \verb_# xend stop_  & stop Xend if already running       \\
    1.73  \verb_# xend restart_ & restart Xend if running, otherwise start it \\
    1.74 +\verb_# xend trace_start_ & start Xend, with very detailed debug logging \\
    1.75 +\verb_# xend status_ & indicates Xend status by its return code
    1.76  \end{tabular}
    1.77  
    1.78  A SysV init script called {\tt xend} is provided to start Xend at boot
    1.79 @@ -1045,8 +1049,8 @@ By default, Xensv will serve out the web
    1.80  can be changed by editing {\tt
    1.81  /usr/lib/python2.3/site-packages/xen/sv/params.py}.
    1.82  
    1.83 -Once Xensv is running, the web interface can be used to manage running
    1.84 -domains and provides a user friendly domain creation wizard.
    1.85 +Once Xensv is running, the web interface can be used to create and
    1.86 +manage running domains.
    1.87  
    1.88  
    1.89  
    1.90 @@ -1305,8 +1309,8 @@ higher throughput.
    1.91  
    1.92  \chapter{Privileged domains}
    1.93  
    1.94 -There are two possible types of privileges:  IO privileges and
    1.95 -administration privileges.
    1.96 +%% There are two possible types of privileges:  IO privileges and
    1.97 +%% administration privileges.
    1.98  
    1.99  \section{Driver domains (IO Privileges)}
   1.100  
   1.101 @@ -1314,8 +1318,7 @@ IO privileges can be assigned to allow a
   1.102  itself.  This is used to support driver domains.
   1.103  
   1.104  Setting backend privileges is currently only supported in SXP format
   1.105 -config files (??? is this true - there's nothing in xmdefconfig,
   1.106 -anyhow).  To allow a domain to function as a backend for others,
   1.107 +config files.  To allow a domain to function as a backend for others,
   1.108  somewhere within the {\tt vm} element of its configuration file must
   1.109  be a {\tt backend} element of the form {\tt (backend ({\em type}))}
   1.110  where {\tt \em type} may be either {\tt netif} or {\tt blkif},
   1.111 @@ -1357,14 +1360,15 @@ can be configured in either format of co
   1.112    or hexadecimal.
   1.113  \end{itemize}
   1.114  
   1.115 -\section{Administration Domains}
   1.116 +%% \section{Administration Domains}
   1.117  
   1.118 -Administration privileges allow a domain to use the `dom0
   1.119 -operations' (so called because they are usually available only to
   1.120 -domain 0).  A privileged domain can build other domains, set scheduling
   1.121 -parameters, etc.
   1.122 +%% Administration privileges allow a domain to use the `dom0
   1.123 +%% operations' (so called because they are usually available only to
   1.124 +%% domain 0).  A privileged domain can build other domains, set scheduling
   1.125 +%% parameters, etc.
   1.126  
   1.127 -% Support for other administrative domains is not yet available...
   1.128 +% Support for other administrative domains is not yet available...  perhaps
   1.129 +% we should plumb it in some time
   1.130  
   1.131  \chapter{Debugging}
   1.132  
   1.133 @@ -1379,7 +1383,7 @@ figuring out what's happened.  Debug a X
   1.134  would any other Linux kernel.
   1.135  
   1.136  We supply a handy debug terminal program which you can find in
   1.137 -/usr/local/src/xen-2.0.bk/tools/misc/miniterm/
   1.138 +\path{/usr/local/src/xen-2.0.bk/tools/misc/miniterm/}
   1.139  This should be built and executed on another machine that is connected
   1.140  via a null modem cable. Documentation is included.
   1.141  Alternatively, if the Xen machine is connected to a serial-port server