ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 1450:5bfc0d01717c

bitkeeper revision 1.950 (40c86066TdQwTUVQtZ0q0py10MTUgg)

Removed old I/O world and cleaned up.
author kaf24@scramble.cl.cam.ac.uk
date Thu Jun 10 13:21:42 2004 +0000 (2004-06-10)
parents 7ae55a8c64e4
children 3567bb7e1227
files .rootkeys docs/HOWTOs/Xen-HOWTO extras/mini-os/h/hypervisor.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/Documentation/Configure.help linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/Makefile linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/config.in linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/defconfigs/dom0 linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/defconfigs/unprivileged linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/backend/common.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/backend/main.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/frontend/common.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/frontend/main.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/frontend/vbd.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/Makefile linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/block.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/block.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/vbd.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/dom0/Makefile linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/dom0/vfr.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/netif/backend/main.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/netif/frontend/main.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/network/Makefile linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/network/network.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/drivers/block/ll_rw_blk.c linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/asm-xen/hypervisor.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/blk.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/major.h linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/init/do_mounts.c tools/examples/xc_dom_control.py tools/examples/xc_dom_create.py tools/xc/lib/xc.h tools/xc/lib/xc_linux_build.c tools/xc/lib/xc_linux_restore.c tools/xc/lib/xc_netbsd_build.c tools/xc/lib/xc_private.h tools/xc/lib/xc_vbd.c tools/xc/lib/xc_vif.c tools/xc/py/Xc.c tools/xenctl/lib/utils.py xen/Makefile xen/Rules.mk xen/arch/i386/entry.S xen/arch/i386/io_apic.c xen/arch/i386/setup.c xen/arch/i386/smp.c xen/common/Makefile xen/common/brlock.c xen/common/domain.c xen/common/kernel.c xen/common/network.c xen/common/rbtree.c xen/drivers/Makefile xen/drivers/acpi_ksyms.c xen/drivers/block/Makefile xen/drivers/block/blkpg.c xen/drivers/block/cciss.c xen/drivers/block/cciss.h xen/drivers/block/cciss_cmd.h xen/drivers/block/cciss_scsi.c xen/drivers/block/cciss_scsi.h xen/drivers/block/elevator.c xen/drivers/block/genhd.c xen/drivers/block/ll_rw_blk.c xen/drivers/block/xen_block.c xen/drivers/block/xen_vbd.c xen/drivers/cdrom/Makefile xen/drivers/cdrom/cdrom.c xen/drivers/ide/Makefile xen/drivers/ide/ide-cd.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-cd.h xen/drivers/ide/ide-disk.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-dma.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-features.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-geometry.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-pci.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-probe.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-taskfile.c xen/drivers/ide/ide-xen.c xen/drivers/ide/ide.c xen/drivers/ide/ide_modes.h xen/drivers/ide/piix.c xen/drivers/message/fusion/Config.in xen/drivers/message/fusion/Makefile xen/drivers/message/fusion/isense.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/linux_compat.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/fc_log.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_cnfg.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_fc.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_history.txt xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_init.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_ioc.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_lan.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_raid.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_targ.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/lsi/mpi_type.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/mptbase.c xen/drivers/message/fusion/mptbase.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/mptscsih.c xen/drivers/message/fusion/mptscsih.h xen/drivers/message/fusion/scsi3.h xen/drivers/net/3c59x.c xen/drivers/net/8139too.c xen/drivers/net/Makefile xen/drivers/net/SUPPORTED_CARDS xen/drivers/net/Space.c xen/drivers/net/dummy.c xen/drivers/net/e100/LICENSE xen/drivers/net/e100/Makefile xen/drivers/net/e100/e100.h xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_config.c xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_config.h xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_eeprom.c xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_main.c xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_phy.c xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_phy.h xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_test.c xen/drivers/net/e100/e100_ucode.h xen/drivers/net/e1000/LICENSE xen/drivers/net/e1000/Makefile xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000.h xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000_ethtool.c xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000_hw.c xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000_hw.h xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000_main.c xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000_osdep.h xen/drivers/net/e1000/e1000_param.c xen/drivers/net/e1000/kcompat.c xen/drivers/net/e1000/kcompat.h xen/drivers/net/net_init.c xen/drivers/net/pcnet32.c xen/drivers/net/setup.c xen/drivers/net/tg3.c xen/drivers/net/tg3.h xen/drivers/net/tulip/21142.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/ChangeLog xen/drivers/net/tulip/Makefile xen/drivers/net/tulip/eeprom.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/interrupt.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/media.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/pnic.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/pnic2.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/timer.c xen/drivers/net/tulip/tulip.h xen/drivers/net/tulip/tulip_core.c xen/drivers/pci/pci.c xen/drivers/scsi/BusLogic.c xen/drivers/scsi/BusLogic.h xen/drivers/scsi/FlashPoint.c.inc xen/drivers/scsi/Makefile xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/Makefile xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/README xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/TODO xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/aachba.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/aacraid.h xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/commctrl.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/comminit.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/commsup.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/dpcsup.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/linit.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/rx.c xen/drivers/scsi/aacraid/sa.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/Makefile xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7770.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7770_osm.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx.reg xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx.seq xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_core.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_host.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_inline.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_osm.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_osm.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_osm_pci.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_pci.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_proc.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_reg.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic79xx_seq.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx.reg xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx.seq xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_93cx6.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_93cx6.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_core.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_host.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_inline.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_osm.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_osm.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_osm_pci.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_pci.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_proc.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_reg.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx_seq.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/Makefile xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_gram.y xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_insformat.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_macro_gram.y xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_macro_scan.l xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_scan.l xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_symbol.c xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aicasm/aicasm_symbol.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/cam.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/queue.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/scsi_iu.h xen/drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/scsi_message.h xen/drivers/scsi/constants.c xen/drivers/scsi/constants.h xen/drivers/scsi/hosts.c xen/drivers/scsi/hosts.h xen/drivers/scsi/megaraid.c xen/drivers/scsi/megaraid.h xen/drivers/scsi/scsi.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi.h xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_dma.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_error.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_ioctl.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_lib.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_merge.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_module.c.inc xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_obsolete.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_obsolete.h xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_proc.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_queue.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_scan.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_syms.c xen/drivers/scsi/scsicam.c xen/drivers/scsi/sd.c xen/drivers/scsi/sd.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/ChangeLog.txt xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/Documentation.txt xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/Makefile xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym53c8xx.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_conf.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_defs.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw.c xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw1.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw2.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_glue.c xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_glue.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_hipd.c xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_hipd.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_malloc.c xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_misc.c xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_misc.h xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_nvram.c xen/drivers/tables.c xen/include/asm-i386/byteorder.h xen/include/asm-i386/ioctl.h xen/include/asm-x86_64/byteorder.h xen/include/asm-x86_64/ioctl.h xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/block.h xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/dom0_ops.h xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/hypervisor-if.h xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/network.h xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/vbd.h xen/include/scsi/scsi.h xen/include/scsi/scsi_ioctl.h xen/include/scsi/scsicam.h xen/include/scsi/sg.h xen/include/xen/blk.h xen/include/xen/blkdev.h xen/include/xen/blkpg.h xen/include/xen/brlock.h xen/include/xen/byteorder/big_endian.h xen/include/xen/byteorder/generic.h xen/include/xen/byteorder/little_endian.h xen/include/xen/byteorder/pdp_endian.h xen/include/xen/byteorder/swab.h xen/include/xen/byteorder/swabb.h xen/include/xen/cdrom.h xen/include/xen/crc32.h xen/include/xen/elevator.h xen/include/xen/etherdevice.h xen/include/xen/ethtool.h xen/include/xen/genhd.h xen/include/xen/hdreg.h xen/include/xen/hdsmart.h xen/include/xen/ide.h xen/include/xen/if.h xen/include/xen/if_ether.h xen/include/xen/if_packet.h xen/include/xen/if_vlan.h xen/include/xen/in.h xen/include/xen/ioctl.h xen/include/xen/kdev_t.h xen/include/xen/major.h xen/include/xen/mii.h xen/include/xen/net_headers.h xen/include/xen/netdevice.h xen/include/xen/notifier.h xen/include/xen/perfc.h xen/include/xen/perfc_defn.h xen/include/xen/rbtree.h xen/include/xen/reboot.h xen/include/xen/sched.h xen/include/xen/skbuff.h xen/include/xen/socket.h xen/include/xen/sockios.h xen/include/xen/timex.h xen/include/xen/vbd.h xen/include/xen/vif.h xen/net/Makefile xen/net/dev.c xen/net/dev_mcast.c xen/net/devinit.c xen/net/eth.c xen/net/skbuff.c
line diff
     1.1 --- a/.rootkeys	Thu Jun 10 11:44:59 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/.rootkeys	Thu Jun 10 13:21:42 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -39,7 +39,6 @@ 3f815145AYE58Kpmsj5U7oHDpVDZJA extras/mi
     1.4  3f815145CB8XdPUqsmhAjSDFuwOoqA extras/mini-os/mm.c
     1.5  3f815145vGYx1WY79voKkZB9yKwJKQ extras/mini-os/time.c
     1.6  3f815145xlKBAQmal9oces3G_Mvxqw extras/mini-os/traps.c
     1.7 -3f05a939TA3SLPY7ZiScMotLjg9owQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/Documentation/Configure.help
     1.8  3e5a4e6589G-U42lFKs43plskXoFxQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/Makefile
     1.9  3e5a4e65IEPjnWPZ5w3TxS5scV8Ewg linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/Makefile
    1.10  3e5a4e65n-KhsEAs-A4ULiStBp-r6w linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/boot/Makefile
    1.11 @@ -60,15 +59,10 @@ 4075806dI5kfeMD5RV-DA0PYoThx_w linux-2.4
    1.12  4075806d4-j7vN0Mn0bklI1cRUX1vQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/frontend/common.h
    1.13  4075806d3fJqqDC1pYYPTZPc575iKg linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/frontend/main.c
    1.14  4075806dibjCcfuXv6CINMhxWTw3jQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/blkif/frontend/vbd.c
    1.15 -3e5a4e65iHEuC5sjFhj42XALYbLVRw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/Makefile
    1.16 -3e5a4e65pP5spJErBW69pJxSSdK9RA linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/block.c
    1.17 -3e67f822FOPwqHiaRKbrskgWgoNL5g linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/block.h
    1.18 -3e676eb5RXnHzSHgA1BvM0B1aIm4qg linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/block/vbd.c
    1.19  3e5a4e65G3e2s0ghPMgiJ-gBTUJ0uQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/console/Makefile
    1.20  3e5a4e651TH-SXHoufurnWjgl5bfOA linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/console/console.c
    1.21  3e5a4e656nfFISThfbyXQOA6HN6YHw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/dom0/Makefile
    1.22  3e5a4e65BXtftInNHUC2PjDfPhdZZA linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/dom0/core.c
    1.23 -3e5a4e65gfn_ltB8ujHMVFApnTTNRQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/dom0/vfr.c
    1.24  40420a6ebRqDjufoN1WSJvolEW2Wjw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/evtchn/Makefile
    1.25  40420a73Wou6JlsZDiu6YwjYomsm7A linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/evtchn/evtchn.c
    1.26  4083dc16-Kd5y9psK_yk161sme5j5Q linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/netif/Makefile
    1.27 @@ -80,8 +74,6 @@ 4087cf0d5dudKw_DecIJgOhLlBF_0Q linux-2.4
    1.28  405853f2wg7JXZJNltspMwOZJklxgw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/netif/frontend/Makefile
    1.29  405853f6nbeazrNyEWNHBuoSg2PiPA linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/netif/frontend/main.c
    1.30  4097ba83Qy2eafeFUhGhm6_4iMIIDw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/netif/netif.h
    1.31 -3e5a4e65gZBRBB6RsSVg1c9iahigAw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/network/Makefile
    1.32 -3e5a4e65ZxKrbFetVB84JhrTyZ1YuQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/drivers/network/network.c
    1.33  3e5a4e65lWzkiPXsZdzPt2RNnJGG1g linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/kernel/Makefile
    1.34  4075806dE5mQwlVUf8-t3YXjiMMWDQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/kernel/ctrl_if.c
    1.35  3e5a4e65_hqfuxtGG8IUy6wRM86Ecg linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/arch/xen/kernel/entry.S
    1.36 @@ -142,12 +134,10 @@ 3f1056a9L_kqHcFheV00KbKBzv9j5w linux-2.4
    1.37  3f689063nhrIRsMMZjZxMFk7iEINqQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/asm-xen/xen_proc.h
    1.38  40659defgWA92arexpMGn8X3QMDj3w linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/asm-xen/xor.h
    1.39  3f056927gMHl7mWB89rb73JahbhQIA linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/blk.h
    1.40 -3e5a4e68WLX3B8owTvktP3HHOtznPQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/major.h
    1.41  401c0590D_kwJDU59X8NyvqSv_Cl2A linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/sched.h
    1.42  40a248afgI0_JKthdYAe8beVfXSTpQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/skbuff.h
    1.43  3e5a4e686V0nioX2ZpFf056sgvdiQw linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/sunrpc/debug.h
    1.44  401c0592pLrp_aCbQRo9GXiYQQaVVA linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/include/linux/timer.h
    1.45 -3e5a4e68W_hpMlM3u_-QOKMp3gzcwQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/init/do_mounts.c
    1.46  3f9d4b44247udoqWEgFkaHiWv6Uvyg linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/kernel/time.c
    1.47  401c059bjLBFYHRD4Py2uM3eA1D4zQ linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/kernel/timer.c
    1.48  3e6e7c1efbQe93xCvOpOVCnXTMmQ5w linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/mkbuildtree
    1.49 @@ -209,8 +199,6 @@ 4051bce6CHAsYh8P5t2OHDtRWOP9og tools/xc/
    1.50  3fbba6dctWRWlFJkYb6hdix2X4WMuw tools/xc/lib/xc_private.c
    1.51  3fbba6dcbVrG2hPzEzwdeV_UC8kydQ tools/xc/lib/xc_private.h
    1.52  40589968UQFnJeOMn8UIFLbXBuwXjw tools/xc/lib/xc_rrobin.c
    1.53 -3fbba6dcoGq9hQlksrBUfC2P5F6sGg tools/xc/lib/xc_vbd.c
    1.54 -3fbba6dc38q-ioRlwSR_quw4G3qUeQ tools/xc/lib/xc_vif.c
    1.55  3fbd0a3dTwnDcfdw0-v46dPbX98zDw tools/xc/py/Makefile
    1.56  3fbd0a42l40lM0IICw2jXbQBVZSdZg tools/xc/py/Xc.c
    1.57  3fbd0a40yT6G3M9hMpaz5xTUdl0E4g tools/xc/py/setup.py
    1.58 @@ -279,7 +267,6 @@ 3ddb79bcOMCu9-5mKpjIh5d0qqBDPg xen/arch/
    1.59  404f1b91uzXgPOtIhs8UZPGbZvlHfg xen/arch/x86_64/Rules.mk
    1.60  3ddb79bdff-gj-jFGKjOejeHLqL8Lg xen/common/Makefile
    1.61  3e397e66AyyD5fYraAySWuwi9uqSXg xen/common/ac_timer.c
    1.62 -3ddb79bdrqnW93GR9gZk1OJe1qK-iQ xen/common/brlock.c
    1.63  4022a73c_BbDFd2YJ_NQYVvKX5Oz7w xen/common/debug-linux.c
    1.64  3fa152581E5KhrAtqZef2Sr5NKTz4w xen/common/debug.c
    1.65  3ddb79bdLX_P6iB7ILiblRLWvebapg xen/common/dom0_ops.c
    1.66 @@ -291,11 +278,9 @@ 3ddb79bd9drcFPVxd4w2GPOIjLlXpA xen/commo
    1.67  3e4cd9d8LAAghUY0hNIK72uc2ch_Nw xen/common/keyhandler.c
    1.68  3ddb79bduhSEZI8xa7IbGQCpap5y2A xen/common/lib.c
    1.69  3ddb79bdS39UXxUtZnaScie83-7VTQ xen/common/memory.c
    1.70 -3ddb79bdN51qpRC-6bOH-v5hl_AK6A xen/common/network.c
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   1.256 -3ddb79beDrImFCFGgB_GLgUbeuHjog xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_error.c
   1.257 -3ddb79bepDvUltYDsInaUsH9lII9Sw xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_ioctl.c
   1.258 -3ddb79berPStE_-ILQHgcl1BLDLywA xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_lib.c
   1.259 -3ddb79beRXjB7_nNUbJMIRyjDmeByQ xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_merge.c
   1.260 -3e56412a_O2cnz-e36volrKvofGe-Q xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_module.c.inc
   1.261 -3faf8290uGugKdeePovsS2MCkm6NYw xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_obsolete.c
   1.262 -3ddb79beQgG_st0eBZUX8AQI7kBkHA xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_obsolete.h
   1.263 -3ddb79beK65cNRldY0CFGXjZ3-A74Q xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_proc.c
   1.264 -3ddb79beeIuwGDE0Ldl8wy6mt86Bag xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_queue.c
   1.265 -3ddb79beQVxjXLLSY896cqce3j6Ehg xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_scan.c
   1.266 -3ddb79beVrSvakLg_9MSo22vJ_TGrA xen/drivers/scsi/scsi_syms.c
   1.267 -3ddb79beC6PIqDEaxAfO3bLKcmMLeA xen/drivers/scsi/scsicam.c
   1.268 -3ddb79bedAG8DPsr3S1N4IASxUuBug xen/drivers/scsi/sd.c
   1.269 -3ddb79beA27dAK0xtNh4k6SJniKnlA xen/drivers/scsi/sd.h
   1.270 -3fd432fb0fW430_7mzTegOyjjFB-Iw xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/ChangeLog.txt
   1.271 -3fd432fbzXmGBq60nilWbfafyDXrtQ xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/Documentation.txt
   1.272 -3fd432fbVpHp1vv8A6GQBZQnKMFS7Q xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/Makefile
   1.273 -3fd432fbAOAdNUuPUOlRmT723POpnQ xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym53c8xx.h
   1.274 -3fd432fbO-kotluBDNXwt3AJ_yiuAw xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_conf.h
   1.275 -3fd432fbFiHM-XyIhDIU3wLuVTEe8Q xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_defs.h
   1.276 -3fd432fbc6E0FNW2CfDhY18WV4fIcA xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw.c
   1.277 -3fd432fbEYdbqLET81nisgPiVVlRtA xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw.h
   1.278 -3fd432fbiymG2mfG5k2HHz1w1hPcHQ xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw1.h
   1.279 -3fd432fbITAwK8BK6-6c8yPfxpxROg xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_fw2.h
   1.280 -3fd432fbr5_OuwNUNPjLfbDdS9iMLw xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_glue.c
   1.281 -3fd432fbRLKL6mW2K5n_pHiTnMxA3Q xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_glue.h
   1.282 -3fd432fbkCURaCXa7kKXvnHI1Y0B6A xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_hipd.c
   1.283 -3fd432fbpPgJcz6YrCxWNx934bK7BQ xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_hipd.h
   1.284 -3fd432fbHyYMzfNAB_5mKGOvh1HTrg xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_malloc.c
   1.285 -3fd432fbFBLr85q2xIgdvDR7S2kvlw xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_misc.c
   1.286 -3fd432fbOri8Ue9-QTi6X-WviC2JYA xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_misc.h
   1.287 -3fd432fbM9qma6nz_-GWRpZ7v1pqrg xen/drivers/scsi/sym53c8xx_2/sym_nvram.c
   1.288 -40715b2bZb6VFx6gPELSuItqa-E84w xen/drivers/tables.c
   1.289  40715b2cFpte_UNWnBZW0Du7z9AhTQ xen/include/acpi/acconfig.h
   1.290  40715b2cEQWX-PaxEH30qI48K1krnQ xen/include/acpi/acdebug.h
   1.291  40715b2c_7j-oy3ZNAuqE3IFNPzArg xen/include/acpi/acdisasm.h
   1.292 @@ -563,7 +352,6 @@ 3ddb79c3l4IiQtf6MS2jIzcd-hJS8g xen/inclu
   1.293  3ddb79c3QJYWr8LLGdonLbWmNb9pQQ xen/include/asm-i386/apicdef.h
   1.294  3ddb79c3OiG9eTsi9Dy3F_OkuRAzKA xen/include/asm-i386/atomic.h
   1.295  3ddb79c3rM-Ote0Xn6Ytg8Y6YqAG-A xen/include/asm-i386/bitops.h
   1.296 -3ddb79c3pXaTAGGWSIZF9EnRV5PlRw xen/include/asm-i386/byteorder.h
   1.297  3ddb79c3KhTI0F_Iw_hRL9QEyOVK-g xen/include/asm-i386/cache.h
   1.298  404f1b920OQVnrbnXnySS-WxrH9Wzw xen/include/asm-i386/config.h
   1.299  3ddb79c2LLt11EQHjrd6sB7FUqvFfA xen/include/asm-i386/cpufeature.h
   1.300 @@ -582,7 +370,6 @@ 3ddb79c3TMDjkxVndKFKnGiwY0HzDg xen/inclu
   1.301  3ddb79c3otbjpnqFDSzSeD0J-0xcwg xen/include/asm-i386/ide.h
   1.302  3ddb79c3fQ_O3o5NHK2N8AJdk0Ea4Q xen/include/asm-i386/io.h
   1.303  3ddb79c2TKeScYHQZreTdHqYNLbehQ xen/include/asm-i386/io_apic.h
   1.304 -3ddb79c3S9Tga4XZRPrD4-aN3XIV6w xen/include/asm-i386/ioctl.h
   1.305  3ddb79c2L7rTlFzazOLW1XuSZefpFw xen/include/asm-i386/irq.h
   1.306  404f1b93OjLO4bFfBXYNaJdIqlNz-Q xen/include/asm-i386/ldt.h
   1.307  3ddb79c3I98vWcQR8xEo34JMJ4Ahyw xen/include/asm-i386/mc146818rtc.h
   1.308 @@ -612,7 +399,6 @@ 404f1b95z0B0jb2IfvZJ7uvmYqsqpg xen/inclu
   1.309  404f1b95_OZH-rw_durHSa_Kgdo95A xen/include/asm-x86_64/apicdef.h
   1.310  404f1b967UWSPkB0cwT9v-rilNzkHw xen/include/asm-x86_64/atomic.h
   1.311  404f1b97UDomt73PizniyrCaxVRkXQ xen/include/asm-x86_64/bitops.h
   1.312 -404f1b98bhUJO45dacAaIRV7OE7P3A xen/include/asm-x86_64/byteorder.h
   1.313  404f1b99W-dMUlFpsvt--tVpQvNgEQ xen/include/asm-x86_64/cache.h
   1.314  404f1b9b_phpQlRnyiWqP6RodfZDpg xen/include/asm-x86_64/config.h
   1.315  404f1b9cz7UV611DK6CTY1ZAiwGtTw xen/include/asm-x86_64/cpufeature.h
   1.316 @@ -630,7 +416,6 @@ 404f1ba7Q-lF892SDZLWjJ62wmauSA xen/inclu
   1.317  404f1ba8yxfnHH0NWC1B-wmd6bK2wg xen/include/asm-x86_64/ide.h
   1.318  404f1ba9_7NIylhSRmokesN8TNIiNg xen/include/asm-x86_64/io.h
   1.319  404f1baaiXXy7vChbzKmluSyJ5LWIw xen/include/asm-x86_64/io_apic.h
   1.320 -404f1bab38sz6Fd2LyLPDD4mMYgd7w xen/include/asm-x86_64/ioctl.h
   1.321  404f1baceMqjaYFs7oZoNsPkaZJ0WQ xen/include/asm-x86_64/irq.h
   1.322  404f1badfXZJZ2sU8sh9PS2EZvd19Q xen/include/asm-x86_64/ldt.h
   1.323  404f1bae_yI5vMg-_k4EySMERbbz2Q xen/include/asm-x86_64/mc146818rtc.h
   1.324 @@ -660,90 +445,48 @@ 404f1bc5idyWKKROGo_hvHVx58Gmkw xen/inclu
   1.325  400304fcmRQmDdFYEzDh0wcBba9alg xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/COPYING
   1.326  404f1bc68SXxmv0zQpXBWGrCzSyp8w xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/arch-i386/hypervisor-if.h
   1.327  404f1bc7IwU-qnH8mJeVu0YsNGMrcw xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/arch-x86_64/hypervisor-if.h
   1.328 -3ddb79c2YTaZwOqWin9-QNgHge5RVw xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/block.h
   1.329  3ddb79c2PMeWTK86y4C3F4MzHw4A1g xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/dom0_ops.h
   1.330  403cd194j2pyLqXD8FJ-ukvZzkPenw xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/event_channel.h
   1.331  3ddb79c25UE59iu4JJcbRalx95mvcg xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/hypervisor-if.h
   1.332  3ead095dE_VF-QA88rl_5cWYRWtRVQ xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/kbd.h
   1.333 -3ddb79c2oRPrzClk3zbTkRHlpumzKA xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/network.h
   1.334  4051db79512nOCGweabrFWO2M2h5ng xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/physdev.h
   1.335  40589968wmhPmV5-ENbBYmMjnedgKw xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/sched_ctl.h
   1.336  404f3d2eR2Owk-ZcGOx9ULGHg3nrww xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/trace.h
   1.337 -3f0d22cbroqp_BkoDPwkfRJhaw1LiQ xen/include/hypervisor-ifs/vbd.h
   1.338 -3ddb79c4qbCoOFHrv9sCGshbWzBVlQ xen/include/scsi/scsi.h
   1.339 -3ddb79c4R4iVwqIIeychVQYmIH4FUg xen/include/scsi/scsi_ioctl.h
   1.340 -3ddb79c4yw_mfd4Uikn3v_IOPRpa1Q xen/include/scsi/scsicam.h
   1.341 -3ddb79c4HKPMLvDBP9LxzPi_szVxGA xen/include/scsi/sg.h
   1.342  3e397e66m2tO3s-J8Jnr7Ws_tGoPTg xen/include/xen/ac_timer.h
   1.343  40715b2epYl2jBbxzz9CI2rgIca7Zg xen/include/xen/acpi.h
   1.344 -3ddb79c0nTsjSpVK4ZVTI9WwN24xtQ xen/include/xen/blk.h
   1.345 -3ddb79c0dVhTHLsv6CPTf4baKix4mA xen/include/xen/blkdev.h
   1.346 -3ddb79c18ePBgitnOs7GiOCFilODVw xen/include/xen/blkpg.h
   1.347 -3ddb79c1oOjpQbp68MW7yiUpoi-S-w xen/include/xen/brlock.h
   1.348 -3ddb79c1x7Ie3kifu7dQRx8y7HVyvA xen/include/xen/byteorder/big_endian.h
   1.349 -3ddb79c1qFXOEX1eD0yXJ_gsGkUt8w xen/include/xen/byteorder/generic.h
   1.350 -3ddb79c1VbwFALNpgx6uC_iZKFHD-A xen/include/xen/byteorder/little_endian.h
   1.351 -3ddb79c1VvNRMM35bpdZMekirCXP-A xen/include/xen/byteorder/pdp_endian.h
   1.352 -3ddb79c116WbJV8bwGZXFFJy_GNNvw xen/include/xen/byteorder/swab.h
   1.353 -3ddb79c1pwmlw8VXW8aaSKAVGVmjDA xen/include/xen/byteorder/swabb.h
   1.354  3ddb79c0c0cX_DZE209-Bb-Rx1v-Aw xen/include/xen/cache.h
   1.355 -3e9c248aEG_nCngztiFmv5CfayNkcA xen/include/xen/cdrom.h
   1.356  3f840f12CkbYSlwMrY2S11Mpyxg7Nw xen/include/xen/compiler.h
   1.357  3ddb79c259jh8hE7vre_8NuE7nwNSA xen/include/xen/config.h
   1.358  3eb165e0eawr3R-p2ZQtSdLWtLRN_A xen/include/xen/console.h
   1.359 -3f0c428eIwGr7n9fj4FkBdX2YvA_Rw xen/include/xen/crc32.h
   1.360  3ddb79c1V44RD26YqCUm-kqIupM37A xen/include/xen/ctype.h
   1.361  3ddb79c05DdHQ0UxX_jKsXdR4QlMCA xen/include/xen/delay.h
   1.362 -3ddb79c1uaWQZj551j1O0B5z8AnHOg xen/include/xen/elevator.h
   1.363  3ddb79c2O729EttZTYu1c8LcsUO_GQ xen/include/xen/elf.h
   1.364  3ddb79c0HIghfBF8zFUdmXhOU8i6hA xen/include/xen/errno.h
   1.365 -3ddb79c0rMjudDKkJku_mkm0J-BZgw xen/include/xen/etherdevice.h
   1.366 -3ddb79c0T3X07lFnM9OSE-W5bqIDSQ xen/include/xen/ethtool.h
   1.367  3ddb79c1W0lQca8gRV7sN6j3iY4Luw xen/include/xen/event.h
   1.368 -3ddb79c1J4I_AjNflZL-1c1jOIlSyg xen/include/xen/genhd.h
   1.369 -3ddb79c1i-chIoeniqgYwMM3EgaR5w xen/include/xen/hdreg.h
   1.370 -3ddb79c12GuUuaxBKiMuwf-Qvuwpng xen/include/xen/hdsmart.h
   1.371 -3ddb79c0MM575N4YvMSiw9EqKH4JDA xen/include/xen/ide.h
   1.372 -3ddb79c1yHLp08JhgPxIMcZ8DwN9hg xen/include/xen/if.h
   1.373 -3ddb79c1RCWOkWPQRzbYVTX_e-E7CA xen/include/xen/if_ether.h
   1.374 -3ddb79c2IYah7z7hkzPyOiG8szKkyw xen/include/xen/if_packet.h
   1.375 -3e4540ccefnCkeqtD_dW_CBOjXUSYw xen/include/xen/if_vlan.h
   1.376 -3df0af1c-QrOEqpPHq4uL3NZzCeJCg xen/include/xen/in.h
   1.377  3ddb79c0GurNF9tDWqQbAwJFH8ugfA xen/include/xen/init.h
   1.378  3ddb79c1Vi5VleJAOKHAlY0G2zAsgw xen/include/xen/interrupt.h
   1.379 -3ddb79c2J6EnruiygRhBCgftzMzTeQ xen/include/xen/ioctl.h
   1.380  3ddb79c1nzaWu8NoF4xCCMSFJR4MlA xen/include/xen/ioport.h
   1.381  3ddb79c2qAxCOABlkKtD8Txohe-qEw xen/include/xen/irq.h
   1.382  3ddb79c2b3qe-6Ann09FqZBF4IrJaQ xen/include/xen/irq_cpustat.h
   1.383 -3ddb79c11w_O7z7YZJnzuDSxaK5LlA xen/include/xen/kdev_t.h
   1.384  3e4540ccPHqIIv2pvnQ1gV8LUnoHIg xen/include/xen/kernel.h
   1.385  3e4cd9d8elj_7EgAs9Of56RQ2Yq_4g xen/include/xen/keyhandler.h
   1.386  3ddb79c1NfYlOrWNqgZkj9EwtFfJow xen/include/xen/lib.h
   1.387  3ddb79c18Ajy7micDGQQfJ0zWgEHtA xen/include/xen/list.h
   1.388 -3ddb79c0_s2_wgV0cA6tztEaeyy1NA xen/include/xen/major.h
   1.389 -3ddb79c1fsWuKI2sGlW5bqoG2lPVNA xen/include/xen/mii.h
   1.390  3ddb79c1gs2VbLbQlw0dcDUXYIepDA xen/include/xen/mm.h
   1.391  3ddb79c13p9iHn1XAp0IS1qvj4yDsg xen/include/xen/module.h
   1.392  3ddb79c1ieLZfGSFwfvvSQ2NK1BMSg xen/include/xen/multiboot.h
   1.393 -3ec92e46saEJq7v1vgEJD3HZSufSBg xen/include/xen/net_headers.h
   1.394 -3ddb79c0CLfAlJLg1ohdPD-Jjn-jxg xen/include/xen/netdevice.h
   1.395 -3e4540ccaugeWGdOuphJKj6WFw1jkw xen/include/xen/notifier.h
   1.396  3ddb79c2Fg44_PBPVxHSC0gTOMq4Ow xen/include/xen/pci.h
   1.397  3ddb79c0MOVXq8qZDQRGb6z64_xAwg xen/include/xen/pci_ids.h
   1.398  3e54c38dlSCVdyVM4PKcrSfzLLxWUQ xen/include/xen/perfc.h
   1.399  3e54c38de9SUSYSAwxDf_DwkpAnQFA xen/include/xen/perfc_defn.h
   1.400  3ddb79c04nQVR3EYM5L4zxDV_MCo1g xen/include/xen/prefetch.h
   1.401 -4006e65fWMwLqcocgik6wbF0Eeh0Og xen/include/xen/rbtree.h
   1.402  3e4540ccU1sgCx8seIMGlahmMfv7yQ xen/include/xen/reboot.h
   1.403  40589969nPq3DMzv24RDb5LXE9brHw xen/include/xen/sched-if.h
   1.404  3ddb79c0LzqqS0LhAQ50ekgj4oGl7Q xen/include/xen/sched.h
   1.405  403a06a7H0hpHcKpAiDe5BPnaXWTlA xen/include/xen/serial.h
   1.406  405b8599BsDsDwKEJLS0XipaiQW3TA xen/include/xen/shadow.h
   1.407 -3ddb79c0VDeD-Oft5eNfMneTU3D1dQ xen/include/xen/skbuff.h
   1.408  3ddb79c14dXIhP7C2ahnoD08K90G_w xen/include/xen/slab.h
   1.409  3ddb79c09xbS-xxfKxuV3JETIhBzmg xen/include/xen/smp.h
   1.410 -3ddb79c1-yIt89RT02wIPp2xDR8YjQ xen/include/xen/socket.h
   1.411 -3ddb79c2V2P9F2xMCzDJ9vbUofSg_Q xen/include/xen/sockios.h
   1.412  3ddb79c2iIcESrDAB8samy_yAh6olQ xen/include/xen/spinlock.h
   1.413  3e7f358aMtFMUVvN_Zjg5qvEJIqEBA xen/include/xen/string.h
   1.414  3ddb79c0BnA20PbgmuMPSGIBljNRQw xen/include/xen/time.h
   1.415 @@ -752,15 +495,7 @@ 3ddb79c2_m8lT9jDKse_tePj7zcnNQ xen/inclu
   1.416  3ddb79c2e2C14HkndNEJlYwXaPrF5A xen/include/xen/tqueue.h
   1.417  403a3edbG9K5uZjuY19_LORbQGmFbA xen/include/xen/trace.h
   1.418  3ddb79c1-kVvF8cVa0k3ZHDdBMj01Q xen/include/xen/types.h
   1.419 -3f055a3dwldYR102YcSuBaxIf9t3Jw xen/include/xen/vbd.h
   1.420  3e8827bdaqPeZAWGVOwswgY9bWSx4g xen/include/xen/version.h
   1.421 -3ddb79c2Ae5KpzhC9LCYG7mP_Vi4Aw xen/include/xen/vif.h
   1.422 -3ddb79c4YQCQ6r0xNLLu0jfbM7pVmA xen/net/Makefile
   1.423 -3ddb79c4AkfDkTCw0comx4L8wsUOMg xen/net/dev.c
   1.424 -3ddb79c4x1L_soh8b-r_1jQW_37Icw xen/net/dev_mcast.c
   1.425 -3ddb79c4KZhNxUuYJ7lul8cc-wRkyg xen/net/devinit.c
   1.426 -3ddb79c4NSDwiQ-AmrYdxcRAwLPzwQ xen/net/eth.c
   1.427 -3ddb79c4TZj1wXPKQt36O72SddtBNQ xen/net/skbuff.c
   1.428  3ddb79c4x8dvwPtzclghWAKFWpEBFA xen/tools/Makefile
   1.429  3ddb79c4yGZ7_22QAFFwPzqP4NSHwA xen/tools/elf-reloc.c
   1.430  3eb3c87fc79FXLA6R9TvdBJNTvQDwA xen/tools/figlet/LICENSE
     2.1 --- a/docs/HOWTOs/Xen-HOWTO	Thu Jun 10 11:44:59 2004 +0000
     2.2 +++ b/docs/HOWTOs/Xen-HOWTO	Thu Jun 10 13:21:42 2004 +0000
     2.3 @@ -49,12 +49,6 @@ to 'n' or off):
     2.4                 applications. For more information see the 
     2.5                 XenDebugger-HOWTO.
     2.6  
     2.7 - old_drivers=y -- Enable the old hardware-device architecture, in
     2.8 -               which network and block devices are managed by
     2.9 -               Xen. The new (and default) model requires such
    2.10 -               devices to be managed by a suitably-privileged
    2.11 -               guest OS (e.g., within domain 0).
    2.12 -
    2.13   perfc=y    -- Enable performance-counters for significant events
    2.14                 within Xen. The counts can be reset or displayed
    2.15                 on Xen's console via console control keys.
     3.1 --- a/extras/mini-os/h/hypervisor.h	Thu Jun 10 11:44:59 2004 +0000
     3.2 +++ b/extras/mini-os/h/hypervisor.h	Thu Jun 10 13:21:42 2004 +0000
     3.3 @@ -12,8 +12,6 @@
     3.4  #include <types.h>
     3.5  
     3.6  /* include the hypervisor interface */
     3.7 -#include <hypervisor-ifs/network.h>
     3.8 -#include <hypervisor-ifs/block.h>
     3.9  #include <hypervisor-ifs/hypervisor-if.h>
    3.10  #include "../../../tools/xend/lib/domain_controller.h"
    3.11  
    3.12 @@ -112,17 +110,6 @@ static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_set_cal
    3.13      return ret;
    3.14  }
    3.15  
    3.16 -static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_net_io_op(netop_t *op)
    3.17 -{
    3.18 -    int ret;
    3.19 -    __asm__ __volatile__ (
    3.20 -        TRAP_INSTR
    3.21 -        : "=a" (ret) : "0" (__HYPERVISOR_net_io_op),
    3.22 -        "b" (op) : "memory" );
    3.23 -
    3.24 -    return ret;
    3.25 -}
    3.26 -
    3.27  static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_fpu_taskswitch(void)
    3.28  {
    3.29      int ret;
    3.30 @@ -214,28 +201,6 @@ static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_dom0_op
    3.31      return ret;
    3.32  }
    3.33  
    3.34 -static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_network_op(void *network_op)
    3.35 -{
    3.36 -    int ret;
    3.37 -    __asm__ __volatile__ (
    3.38 -        TRAP_INSTR
    3.39 -        : "=a" (ret) : "0" (__HYPERVISOR_network_op),
    3.40 -        "b" (network_op) : "memory" );
    3.41 -
    3.42 -    return ret;
    3.43 -}
    3.44 -
    3.45 -static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_block_io_op(unsigned int op)
    3.46 -{
    3.47 -    int ret;
    3.48 -    __asm__ __volatile__ (
    3.49 -        TRAP_INSTR
    3.50 -        : "=a" (ret) : "0" (__HYPERVISOR_block_io_op),
    3.51 -        "b" (op) : "memory" ); 
    3.52 -
    3.53 -    return ret;
    3.54 -}
    3.55 -
    3.56  static __inline__ int HYPERVISOR_set_debugreg(int reg, unsigned long value)
    3.57  {
    3.58      int ret;
     4.1 --- a/linux-2.4.26-xen-sparse/Documentation/Configure.help	Thu Jun 10 11:44:59 2004 +0000
     4.2 +++ /dev/null	Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 1970 +0000
     4.3 @@ -1,29164 +0,0 @@
     4.4 -# Maintained by:
     4.5 -#	Eric S. Raymond <mailto:esr@thyrsus.com>
     4.6 -#	Steven Cole <mailto:elenstev@mesatop.com>
     4.7 -#
     4.8 -# Translations of this file available on the WWW:
     4.9 -#
    4.10 -#   - Japanese, maintained by the JF Project <mailto:JF@linux.or.jp>, at
    4.11 -#     <http://www.linux.or.jp/JF/JFdocs/Configure.help/>
    4.12 -#   - Russian, by <mailto:kaf@linux.nevod.perm.su>, at
    4.13 -#     <http://nevod.perm.su/service/linux/doc/kernel/Configure.help>
    4.14 -#   - French, by Pierre Tane <mailto:tanep@bigfoot.com>, at
    4.15 -#     <http://www.traduc.org/kernelfr/>
    4.16 -#   - Polish, by Dominik Mierzejewski <mailto:dominik@piorunek.pl>, at
    4.17 -#     <http://www.piorunek.pl/~dominik/linux/kernel/>
    4.18 -#   - German, by SuSE, at <http://www.suse.de/~ke/kernel/>. This patch
    4.19 -#     also includes infrastructure to support different languages.
    4.20 -#   - Catalan, by Antoni Bella <mailto:bella5@teleline.es>, at
    4.21 -#     <http://www.terra.es/personal7/bella5/traduccions.htm>
    4.22 -#
    4.23 -# Information about what a kernel is, what it does, how to patch and
    4.24 -# compile it and much more is contained in the Kernel-HOWTO, available
    4.25 -# at <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Before you start
    4.26 -# compiling, make sure that you have the necessary versions of all
    4.27 -# programs and libraries required to compile and run this kernel; they
    4.28 -# are listed in the <file:Documentation/Changes>. Make sure to read the
    4.29 -# toplevel kernel README file as well.
    4.30 -#
    4.31 -# Format of this file: description<nl>variable<nl>help text<nl><nl>.
    4.32 -# The help texts may contain empty lines, but every non-empty line must
    4.33 -# be indented two positions.  Order of the help texts does not matter,
    4.34 -# however, no variable should be documented twice: if it is, only the
    4.35 -# first occurrence will be used. We try to keep the help texts of related
    4.36 -# variables close together. Lines starting with `#' are ignored. To be
    4.37 -# nice to menuconfig, limit your line length to 70 characters. Use emacs'
    4.38 -# kfill.el to edit and ispell.el to spell check this file or you lose.
    4.39 -#
    4.40 -# Comments of the form "# Choice:" followed by a menu name are used
    4.41 -# internally by the maintainers' consistency-checking tools.
    4.42 -#
    4.43 -# If you add a help text to this file, please try to be as gentle as
    4.44 -# possible. Don't use unexplained acronyms and generally write for the
    4.45 -# hypothetical ignorant but intelligent user who has just bought a PC,
    4.46 -# removed Windows, installed Linux and is now recompiling the kernel
    4.47 -# for the first time. Tell them what to do if they're unsure. Technical
    4.48 -# information should go in a README in the Documentation directory.
    4.49 -#
    4.50 -# Mention all the relevant READMEs and HOWTOs in the help text.
    4.51 -# Make them file URLs relative to the top level of the source tree so
    4.52 -# that help browsers can turn them into hotlinks.  All URLs should be
    4.53 -# surrounded by <>.
    4.54 -#
    4.55 -# Repetitions are fine since the help texts are not meant to be read
    4.56 -# in sequence.  It is good style to include URLs pointing to more
    4.57 -# detailed technical information, pictures of the hardware, etc.
    4.58 -#
    4.59 -# The most important thing to include in a help entry is *motivation*.
    4.60 -# Explain why someone configuring a kernel might want to select your
    4.61 -# option.
    4.62 -#
    4.63 -# All this was shamelessly stolen from numerous different sources. Many
    4.64 -# thanks to all the contributors. Feel free to use these help texts in
    4.65 -# your own kernel configuration tools. The texts are copyrighted (c)
    4.66 -# 1995-2000 by Axel Boldt and many others and are governed by the GNU
    4.67 -# General Public License.
    4.68 -
    4.69 -Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
    4.70 -CONFIG_EXPERIMENTAL
    4.71 -  Some of the various things that Linux supports (such as network
    4.72 -  drivers, file systems, network protocols, etc.) can be in a state
    4.73 -  of development where the functionality, stability, or the level of
    4.74 -  testing is not yet high enough for general use. This is usually
    4.75 -  known as the "alpha-test" phase among developers. If a feature is
    4.76 -  currently in alpha-test, then the developers usually discourage
    4.77 -  uninformed widespread use of this feature by the general public to
    4.78 -  avoid "Why doesn't this work?" type mail messages. However, active
    4.79 -  testing and use of these systems is welcomed. Just be aware that it
    4.80 -  may not meet the normal level of reliability or it may fail to work
    4.81 -  in some special cases. Detailed bug reports from people familiar
    4.82 -  with the kernel internals are usually welcomed by the developers
    4.83 -  (before submitting bug reports, please read the documents
    4.84 -  <file:README>, <file:MAINTAINERS>, <file:REPORTING-BUGS>,
    4.85 -  <file:Documentation/BUG-HUNTING>, and
    4.86 -  <file:Documentation/oops-tracing.txt> in the kernel source).
    4.87 -
    4.88 -  This option will also make obsoleted drivers available. These are
    4.89 -  drivers that have been replaced by something else, and/or are
    4.90 -  scheduled to be removed in a future kernel release.
    4.91 -
    4.92 -  Unless you intend to help test and develop a feature or driver that
    4.93 -  falls into this category, or you have a situation that requires
    4.94 -  using these features, you should probably say N here, which will
    4.95 -  cause the configurator to present you with fewer choices. If
    4.96 -  you say Y here, you will be offered the choice of using features or
    4.97 -  drivers that are currently considered to be in the alpha-test phase.
    4.98 -
    4.99 -Prompt for drivers for obsolete features and hardware
   4.100 -CONFIG_OBSOLETE
   4.101 -  Obsolete drivers have usually been replaced by more recent software
   4.102 -  that can talk to the same hardware.  Obsolete hardware is things
   4.103 -  like MGA monitors that you are very unlikely to see on today's
   4.104 -  systems.
   4.105 -
   4.106 -Prompt for advanced kernel configuration options
   4.107 -CONFIG_ADVANCED_OPTIONS
   4.108 -  This option will enable prompting for a variety of advanced kernel
   4.109 -  configuration options.  These options can cause the kernel to not
   4.110 -  work if they are set incorrectly, but can be used to optimize certain
   4.111 -  aspects of kernel memory management.
   4.112 -
   4.113 -  Unless you know what you are doing you *should not* enable this option.
   4.114 -
   4.115 -Symmetric Multi-Processing support
   4.116 -CONFIG_SMP
   4.117 -  This enables support for systems with more than one CPU. If you have
   4.118 -  a system with only one CPU, like most personal computers, say N. If
   4.119 -  you have a system with more than one CPU, say Y.
   4.120 -
   4.121 -  If you say N here, the kernel will run on single and multiprocessor
   4.122 -  machines, but will use only one CPU of a multiprocessor machine. If
   4.123 -  you say Y here, the kernel will run on many, but not all,
   4.124 -  single machines. On a singleprocessor machine, the kernel
   4.125 -  will run faster if you say N here.
   4.126 -
   4.127 -  Note that if you say Y here and choose architecture "586" or
   4.128 -  "Pentium" under "Processor family", the kernel will not work on 486
   4.129 -  architectures. Similarly, multiprocessor kernels for the "PPro"
   4.130 -  architecture may not work on all Pentium based boards.
   4.131 -
   4.132 -  People using multiprocessor machines who say Y here should also say
   4.133 -  Y to "Enhanced Real Time Clock Support", below. The "Advanced Power
   4.134 -  Management" code will be disabled if you say Y here.
   4.135 -
   4.136 -  See also the <file:Documentation/smp.tex>,
   4.137 -  <file:Documentation/smp.txt>, <file:Documentation/i386/IO-APIC.txt>,
   4.138 -  <file:Documentation/nmi_watchdog.txt> and the SMP-HOWTO available at
   4.139 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
   4.140 -
   4.141 -  If you don't know what to do here, say N.
   4.142 -
   4.143 -Maximum number of CPUs
   4.144 -CONFIG_NR_CPUS
   4.145 -  This allows you to specify the maximum number of CPUs which this
   4.146 -  kernel will support.  The maximum supported value is 32 and the
   4.147 -  mimimum value which makes sense is 2.
   4.148 -
   4.149 -  This is purely to save memory - each supported CPU adds
   4.150 -  approximately eight kilobytes to the kernel image.
   4.151 -
   4.152 -Intel or compatible 80x86 processor
   4.153 -CONFIG_X86
   4.154 -  This is Linux's home port.  Linux was originally native to the Intel
   4.155 -  386, and runs on all the later x86 processors including the Intel
   4.156 -  486, 586, Pentiums, and various instruction-set-compatible chips by
   4.157 -  AMD, Cyrix, and others.
   4.158 -
   4.159 -Alpha processor
   4.160 -CONFIG_ALPHA
   4.161 -  The Alpha is a 64-bit general-purpose processor designed and
   4.162 -  marketed by the Digital Equipment Corporation of blessed memory, now
   4.163 -  Compaq.  Alpha Linux dates from 1995-1996 and was the first non-x86
   4.164 -  port. The Alpha Linux project has a home page at
   4.165 -  <http://www.alphalinux.org/>.
   4.166 -
   4.167 -32-bit Sun Sparc
   4.168 -CONFIG_SPARC32
   4.169 -  SPARC is a family of RISC microprocessors designed and marketed by
   4.170 -  Sun Microsystems, incorporated.  They are very widely found in Sun
   4.171 -  workstations and clones. This port covers the original 32-bit SPARC;
   4.172 -  it is old and stable and usually considered one of the "big three"
   4.173 -  along with the Intel and Alpha ports.  The UltraLinux project
   4.174 -  maintains both the SPARC32 and SPARC64 ports; its web page is
   4.175 -  available at <http://www.ultralinux.org/>.
   4.176 -
   4.177 -64-bit Sun Sparc
   4.178 -CONFIG_SPARC64
   4.179 -  SPARC is a family of RISC microprocessors designed and marketed by
   4.180 -  Sun Microsystems, incorporated.  This port covers the newer 64-bit
   4.181 -  UltraSPARC.  The UltraLinux project maintains both the SPARC32 and
   4.182 -  SPARC64 ports; its web page is available at
   4.183 -  <http://www.ultralinux.org/>.
   4.184 -
   4.185 -Power PC processor
   4.186 -CONFIG_PPC
   4.187 -  The PowerPC is a very capable 32-bit RISC processor from Motorola,
   4.188 -  the successor to their 68000 and 88000 series.  It powers recent
   4.189 -  Macintoshes and also a widely-used series of single-board computers
   4.190 -  from Motorola.  The Linux PowerPC port has a home page at
   4.191 -  <http://penguinppc.org/>.
   4.192 -
   4.193 -Motorola 68K processors
   4.194 -CONFIG_M68K
   4.195 -  The Motorola 68K microprocessors are now obsolete, having been
   4.196 -  superseded by the PowerPC line also from Motorola.  But they powered
   4.197 -  the first wave of workstation hardware in the 1980s, including Sun
   4.198 -  workstations; they were also the basis of the original Amiga and
   4.199 -  later Atari personal computers.  A lot of this hardware is still
   4.200 -  around.  The m68k project has a home page at
   4.201 -  <http://www.linux-m68k.org/>.
   4.202 -
   4.203 -ARM processors
   4.204 -CONFIG_ARM
   4.205 -  The ARM series is a line of low-power-consumption RISC chip designs
   4.206 -  licensed by ARM ltd and targeted at embedded applications and
   4.207 -  handhelds such as the Compaq IPAQ.  ARM-based PCs are no longer
   4.208 -  manufactured, but  legacy ARM-based PC hardware remains popular in
   4.209 -  Europe.  There is an ARM Linux project with a web page at
   4.210 -  <http://www.arm.linux.org.uk/>.
   4.211 -
   4.212 -SuperH processors
   4.213 -CONFIG_SUPERH
   4.214 -  The SuperH is a RISC processor targeted for use in embedded systems
   4.215 -  and consumer electronics; it was also used in the Sega Dreamcast
   4.216 -  gaming console.  The SuperH port has a home page at
   4.217 -  <http://www.sh-linux.org/>.
   4.218 -
   4.219 -IA64 processors, including Intel Itanium
   4.220 -CONFIG_IA64
   4.221 -  The Itanium is Intel's 64-bit successor to the 32-bit X86 line.  As
   4.222 -  of early 2001 it is not yet in widespread production use.  The Linux
   4.223 -  IA-64 project has a home page at <http://www.linuxia64.org/>.
   4.224 -
   4.225 -HP PA-RISC processor
   4.226 -CONFIG_PARISC
   4.227 -  The PA-RISC microprocessor is a RISC chip designed by
   4.228 -  Hewlett-Packard and used in their line of workstations.  The PA-RISC
   4.229 -  Linux project has a home page at <www.parisc-linux.org>.
   4.230 -
   4.231 -IBM System/390
   4.232 -CONFIG_S390
   4.233 -  Linux now runs on the venerable System/390 mainframe from IBM, in a
   4.234 -  guest partition under VM.  In fact, over 40,000 simultaneous Linux
   4.235 -  images have been run on a single mainframe!  The S390 Linux project
   4.236 -  has a home page at <http://linux.s390.org/>.
   4.237 -
   4.238 -Axis Communications ETRAX 100LX embedded network CPU
   4.239 -CONFIG_CRIS
   4.240 -  Linux has been ported to run on the Axis Communications ETRAX 100LX
   4.241 -  CPU and the single-board computers built around it, targeted for
   4.242 -  network and embedded applications.  For more information see the
   4.243 -  Axis Communication site, <http://developer.axis.com/>.
   4.244 -
   4.245 -Unsynced TSC support
   4.246 -CONFIG_X86_TSC_DISABLE
   4.247 -  This option is used for getting Linux to run on a NUMA multi-node 
   4.248 -  boxes, laptops and other systems suffering from unsynced TSCs or 
   4.249 -  TSC drift, which can cause gettimeofday to return non-monotonic values. 
   4.250 -  Choosing this option will disable the CONFIG_X86_TSC optimization,
   4.251 -  and allows you to then specify "notsc" as a boot option regardless of 
   4.252 -  which processor you have compiled for. 
   4.253 -  
   4.254 -  NOTE: If your system hangs when init should run, you are probably
   4.255 -  using a i686 compiled glibc which reads the TSC without checking for 
   4.256 -  availability. Boot without "notsc" and install a i386 compiled glibc 
   4.257 -  to solve the problem.
   4.258 -
   4.259 -  If unsure, say N.
   4.260 -
   4.261 -Multiquad support for NUMAQ systems
   4.262 -CONFIG_X86_NUMAQ
   4.263 -  This option is used for getting Linux to run on a (IBM/Sequent) NUMA 
   4.264 -  multiquad box. This changes the way that processors are bootstrapped,
   4.265 -  and uses Clustered Logical APIC addressing mode instead of Flat Logical.
   4.266 -  You will need a new lynxer.elf file to flash your firmware with - send
   4.267 -  email to Martin.Bligh@us.ibm.com
   4.268 -
   4.269 -Support for IBM Summit (EXA) systems
   4.270 -CONFIG_X86_SUMMIT
   4.271 -  This option is needed for IBM systems that use the Summit/EXA chipset.
   4.272 -  (EXA: Extendable Xseries Architecture)In particular, it is needed for 
   4.273 -  the x440 (even for the 4-CPU model).
   4.274 -
   4.275 -  If you don't have this computer, you may safely say N.
   4.276 -
   4.277 -IO-APIC support on uniprocessors
   4.278 -CONFIG_X86_UP_IOAPIC
   4.279 -  An IO-APIC (I/O Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller) is an
   4.280 -  SMP-capable replacement for PC-style interrupt controllers. Most
   4.281 -  SMP systems and a small number of uniprocessor systems have one.
   4.282 -  If you have a single-CPU system with an IO-APIC, you can say Y here
   4.283 -  to use it. If you say Y here even though your machine doesn't have
   4.284 -  an IO-APIC, then the kernel will still run with no slowdown at all.
   4.285 -
   4.286 -  If you have a system with several CPUs, you do not need to say Y
   4.287 -  here: the IO-APIC will be used automatically.
   4.288 -
   4.289 -Local APIC Support on Uniprocessors
   4.290 -CONFIG_X86_UP_APIC
   4.291 -  A local APIC (Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller) is an
   4.292 -  integrated interrupt controller in the CPU. If you have a single-CPU
   4.293 -  system which has a processor with a local APIC, you can say Y here to
   4.294 -  enable and use it. If you say Y here even though your machine doesn't
   4.295 -  have a local APIC, then the kernel will still run with no slowdown at
   4.296 -  all. The local APIC supports CPU-generated self-interrupts (timer,
   4.297 -  performance counters), and the NMI watchdog which detects hard lockups.
   4.298 -
   4.299 -  If you have a system with several CPUs, you do not need to say Y
   4.300 -  here: the local APIC will be used automatically.
   4.301 -
   4.302 -Kernel math emulation
   4.303 -CONFIG_MATH_EMULATION
   4.304 -  Linux can emulate a math coprocessor (used for floating point
   4.305 -  operations) if you don't have one. 486DX and Pentium processors have
   4.306 -  a math coprocessor built in, 486SX and 386 do not, unless you added
   4.307 -  a 487DX or 387, respectively. (The messages during boot time can
   4.308 -  give you some hints here ["man dmesg"].) Everyone needs either a
   4.309 -  coprocessor or this emulation.
   4.310 -
   4.311 -  If you don't have a math coprocessor, you need to say Y here; if you
   4.312 -  say Y here even though you have a coprocessor, the coprocessor will
   4.313 -  be used nevertheless. (This behaviour can be changed with the kernel
   4.314 -  command line option "no387", which comes handy if your coprocessor
   4.315 -  is broken. Try "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot
   4.316 -  loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to pass options to the kernel at
   4.317 -  boot time.) This means that it is a good idea to say Y here if you
   4.318 -  intend to use this kernel on different machines.
   4.319 -
   4.320 -  More information about the internals of the Linux math coprocessor
   4.321 -  emulation can be found in <file:arch/i386/math-emu/README>.
   4.322 -
   4.323 -  If you are not sure, say Y; apart from resulting in a 66 KB bigger
   4.324 -  kernel, it won't hurt.
   4.325 -
   4.326 -Timer and CPU usage LEDs
   4.327 -CONFIG_LEDS
   4.328 -  If you say Y here, the LEDs on your machine will be used
   4.329 -  to provide useful information about your current system status.
   4.330 -
   4.331 -  If you are compiling a kernel for a NetWinder or EBSA-285, you will
   4.332 -  be able to select which LEDs are active using the options below. If
   4.333 -  you are compiling a kernel for the EBSA-110 or the LART however, the
   4.334 -  red LED will simply flash regularly to indicate that the system is
   4.335 -  still functional. It is safe to say Y here if you have a CATS
   4.336 -  system, but the driver will do nothing.
   4.337 -
   4.338 -Timer LED
   4.339 -CONFIG_LEDS_TIMER
   4.340 -  If you say Y here, one of the system LEDs (the green one on the
   4.341 -  NetWinder, the amber one on the EBSA285, or the red one on the LART)
   4.342 -  will flash regularly to indicate that the system is still
   4.343 -  operational. This is mainly useful to kernel hackers who are
   4.344 -  debugging unstable kernels.
   4.345 -
   4.346 -  The LART uses the same LED for both Timer LED and CPU usage LED
   4.347 -  functions. You may choose to use both, but the Timer LED function
   4.348 -  will overrule the CPU usage LED.
   4.349 -
   4.350 -CPU usage LED
   4.351 -CONFIG_LEDS_CPU
   4.352 -  If you say Y here, the red LED will be used to give a good real
   4.353 -  time indication of CPU usage, by lighting whenever the idle task
   4.354 -  is not currently executing.
   4.355 -
   4.356 -  The LART uses the same LED for both Timer LED and CPU usage LED
   4.357 -  functions. You may choose to use both, but the Timer LED function
   4.358 -  will overrule the CPU usage LED.
   4.359 -
   4.360 -Kernel FP software completion
   4.361 -CONFIG_MATHEMU
   4.362 -  This option is required for IEEE compliant floating point arithmetic
   4.363 -  on the Alpha. The only time you would ever not say Y is to say M in
   4.364 -  order to debug the code. Say Y unless you know what you are doing.
   4.365 -
   4.366 -# Choice: himem
   4.367 -High Memory support
   4.368 -CONFIG_NOHIGHMEM
   4.369 -  Linux can use up to 64 Gigabytes of physical memory on x86 systems.
   4.370 -  However, the address space of 32-bit x86 processors is only 4
   4.371 -  Gigabytes large. That means that, if you have a large amount of
   4.372 -  physical memory, not all of it can be "permanently mapped" by the
   4.373 -  kernel. The physical memory that's not permanently mapped is called
   4.374 -  "high memory".
   4.375 -
   4.376 -  If you are compiling a kernel which will never run on a machine with
   4.377 -  more than 960 megabytes of total physical RAM, answer "off" here (default
   4.378 -  choice and suitable for most users). This will result in a "3GB/1GB"
   4.379 -  split: 3GB are mapped so that each process sees a 3GB virtual memory
   4.380 -  space and the remaining part of the 4GB virtual memory space is used
   4.381 -  by the kernel to permanently map as much physical memory as
   4.382 -  possible.
   4.383 -
   4.384 -  If the machine has between 1 and 4 Gigabytes physical RAM, then
   4.385 -  answer "4GB" here.
   4.386 -
   4.387 -  If more than 4 Gigabytes is used then answer "64GB" here. This
   4.388 -  selection turns Intel PAE (Physical Address Extension) mode on.
   4.389 -  PAE implements 3-level paging on IA32 processors. PAE is fully
   4.390 -  supported by Linux, PAE mode is implemented on all recent Intel
   4.391 -  processors (Pentium Pro and better). NOTE: If you say "64GB" here,
   4.392 -  then the kernel will not boot on CPUs that don't support PAE!
   4.393 -
   4.394 -  The actual amount of total physical memory will either be auto
   4.395 -  detected or can be forced by using a kernel command line option such
   4.396 -  as "mem=256M". (Try "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your
   4.397 -  boot loader (grub, lilo or loadlin) about how to pass options to the
   4.398 -  kernel at boot time.)
   4.399 -
   4.400 -  If unsure, say "off".
   4.401 -
   4.402 -4GB
   4.403 -CONFIG_HIGHMEM4G
   4.404 -  Select this if you have a 32-bit processor and between 1 and 4
   4.405 -  gigabytes of physical RAM.
   4.406 -
   4.407 -64GB
   4.408 -CONFIG_HIGHMEM64G
   4.409 -  Select this if you have a 32-bit processor and more than 4
   4.410 -  gigabytes of physical RAM.
   4.411 -
   4.412 -HIGHMEM I/O support
   4.413 -CONFIG_HIGHIO
   4.414 -  If you want to be able to do I/O to high memory pages, say Y.
   4.415 -  Otherwise low memory pages are used as bounce buffers causing a
   4.416 -  degrade in performance.
   4.417 -
   4.418 -OOM killer support
   4.419 -CONFIG_OOM_KILLER
   4.420 -   This option selects the kernel behaviour during total out of memory
   4.421 -   condition. 
   4.422 -
   4.423 -   The default behaviour is to, as soon as no freeable memory and no swap
   4.424 -   space are available, kill the task which tries to allocate memory. 
   4.425 -   The default behaviour is very reliable.
   4.426 -
   4.427 -   If you select this option, as soon as no freeable memory is available, 
   4.428 -   the kernel will try to select the "best" task to be killed.
   4.429 -
   4.430 -   If unsure, say N.
   4.431 -
   4.432 -Normal floppy disk support
   4.433 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_FD
   4.434 -  If you want to use the floppy disk drive(s) of your PC under Linux,
   4.435 -  say Y. Information about this driver, especially important for IBM
   4.436 -  Thinkpad users, is contained in <file:Documentation/floppy.txt>.
   4.437 -  That file also contains the location of the Floppy driver FAQ as
   4.438 -  well as location of the fdutils package used to configure additional
   4.439 -  parameters of the driver at run time.
   4.440 -
   4.441 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
   4.442 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
   4.443 -  The module will be called floppy.o. If you want to compile it as a
   4.444 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
   4.445 -
   4.446 -iSeries Virtual I/O Disk Support
   4.447 -CONFIG_VIODASD
   4.448 -  If you are running on an iSeries system and you want to use
   4.449 -  virtual disks created and managed by OS/400, say Y.
   4.450 -
   4.451 -iSeries Virtual I/O Disk IDE Emulation
   4.452 -CONFIG_VIODASD_IDE
   4.453 -  This causes the iSeries virtual disks to look like IDE disks.
   4.454 -  If you have programs or utilities that only support certain
   4.455 -  kinds of disks, this option will cause iSeries virtual disks
   4.456 -  to pretend to be IDE disks, which may satisfy the program.
   4.457 -
   4.458 -Support for PowerMac floppy
   4.459 -CONFIG_MAC_FLOPPY
   4.460 -  If you have a SWIM-3 (Super Woz Integrated Machine 3; from Apple)
   4.461 -  floppy controller, say Y here. Most commonly found in PowerMacs.
   4.462 -
   4.463 -RAM disk support
   4.464 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM
   4.465 -  Saying Y here will allow you to use a portion of your RAM memory as
   4.466 -  a block device, so that you can make file systems on it, read and
   4.467 -  write to it and do all the other things that you can do with normal
   4.468 -  block devices (such as hard drives). It is usually used to load and
   4.469 -  store a copy of a minimal root file system off of a floppy into RAM
   4.470 -  during the initial install of Linux.
   4.471 -
   4.472 -  Note that the kernel command line option "ramdisk=XX" is now
   4.473 -  obsolete. For details, read <file:Documentation/ramdisk.txt>.
   4.474 -
   4.475 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
   4.476 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.477 -  say M and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be
   4.478 -  called rd.o.
   4.479 -
   4.480 -  Most normal users won't need the RAM disk functionality, and can
   4.481 -  thus say N here.
   4.482 -
   4.483 -Default RAM disk size
   4.484 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM_SIZE
   4.485 -  The default value is 4096. Only change this if you know what are
   4.486 -  you doing. If you are using IBM S/390, then set this to 8192.
   4.487 -
   4.488 -Initial RAM disk (initrd) support
   4.489 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_INITRD
   4.490 -  The initial RAM disk is a RAM disk that is loaded by the boot loader
   4.491 -  (loadlin or lilo) and that is mounted as root before the normal boot
   4.492 -  procedure. It is typically used to load modules needed to mount the
   4.493 -  "real" root file system, etc. See <file:Documentation/initrd.txt>
   4.494 -  for details.
   4.495 -
   4.496 -Embed root filesystem ramdisk into the kernel
   4.497 -CONFIG_EMBEDDED_RAMDISK
   4.498 -  Select this option if you want to build the ramdisk image into the
   4.499 -  the final kernel binary.
   4.500 -
   4.501 -Filename of gziped ramdisk image
   4.502 -CONFIG_EMBEDDED_RAMDISK_IMAGE
   4.503 -  This is the filename of the ramdisk image to be built into the
   4.504 -  kernel.  Relative pathnames are relative to arch/mips/ramdisk/.
   4.505 -  The ramdisk image is not part of the kernel distribution; you must
   4.506 -  provide one yourself.
   4.507 -
   4.508 -Loopback device support
   4.509 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_LOOP
   4.510 -  Saying Y here will allow you to use a regular file as a block
   4.511 -  device; you can then create a file system on that block device and
   4.512 -  mount it just as you would mount other block devices such as hard
   4.513 -  drive partitions, CD-ROM drives or floppy drives. The loop devices
   4.514 -  are block special device files with major number 7 and typically
   4.515 -  called /dev/loop0, /dev/loop1 etc.
   4.516 -
   4.517 -  This is useful if you want to check an ISO 9660 file system before
   4.518 -  burning the CD, or if you want to use floppy images without first
   4.519 -  writing them to floppy. Furthermore, some Linux distributions avoid
   4.520 -  the need for a dedicated Linux partition by keeping their complete
   4.521 -  root file system inside a DOS FAT file using this loop device
   4.522 -  driver.
   4.523 -
   4.524 -  The loop device driver can also be used to "hide" a file system in a
   4.525 -  disk partition, floppy, or regular file, either using encryption
   4.526 -  (scrambling the data) or steganography (hiding the data in the low
   4.527 -  bits of, say, a sound file). This is also safe if the file resides
   4.528 -  on a remote file server. If you want to do this, you will first have
   4.529 -  to acquire and install a kernel patch from
   4.530 -  <ftp://ftp.kerneli.org/pub/kerneli/>, and then you need to
   4.531 -  say Y to this option.
   4.532 -
   4.533 -  Note that alternative ways to use encrypted file systems are
   4.534 -  provided by the cfs package, which can be gotten from
   4.535 -  <ftp://ftp.kerneli.org/pub/kerneli/net-source/>, and the newer tcfs
   4.536 -  package, available at <http://tcfs.dia.unisa.it/>. You do not need
   4.537 -  to say Y here if you want to use one of these. However, using cfs
   4.538 -  requires saying Y to "NFS file system support" below while using
   4.539 -  tcfs requires applying a kernel patch. An alternative steganography
   4.540 -  solution is provided by StegFS, also available from
   4.541 -  <ftp://ftp.kerneli.org/pub/kerneli/net-source/>.
   4.542 -
   4.543 -  To use the loop device, you need the losetup utility and a recent
   4.544 -  version of the mount program, both contained in the util-linux
   4.545 -  package. The location and current version number of util-linux is
   4.546 -  contained in the file <file:Documentation/Changes>.
   4.547 -
   4.548 -  Note that this loop device has nothing to do with the loopback
   4.549 -  device used for network connections from the machine to itself.
   4.550 -
   4.551 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.552 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.553 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
   4.554 -  will be called loop.o.
   4.555 -
   4.556 -  Most users will answer N here.
   4.557 -
   4.558 -Micro Memory MM5415 Battery Backed RAM support (EXPERIMENTAL)
   4.559 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_UMEM
   4.560 -  Saying Y here will include support for the MM5415 family of
   4.561 -  battery backed (Non-volatile) RAM cards.
   4.562 -  <http://www.umem.com/>
   4.563 -
   4.564 -  The cards appear as block devices that can be partitioned into
   4.565 -  as many as 15 partitions.
   4.566 -
   4.567 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.568 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.569 -  say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be
   4.570 -  called umem.o.
   4.571 -
   4.572 -  The umem driver has been allocated block major number 116.
   4.573 -  See Documentation/devices.txt for recommended device naming.
   4.574 -
   4.575 -Network block device support
   4.576 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_NBD
   4.577 -  Saying Y here will allow your computer to be a client for network
   4.578 -  block devices, i.e. it will be able to use block devices exported by
   4.579 -  servers (mount file systems on them etc.). Communication between
   4.580 -  client and server works over TCP/IP networking, but to the client
   4.581 -  program this is hidden: it looks like a regular local file access to
   4.582 -  a block device special file such as /dev/nd0.
   4.583 -
   4.584 -  Network block devices also allows you to run a block-device in
   4.585 -  userland (making server and client physically the same computer,
   4.586 -  communicating using the loopback network device).
   4.587 -
   4.588 -  Read <file:Documentation/nbd.txt> for more information, especially
   4.589 -  about where to find the server code, which runs in user space and
   4.590 -  does not need special kernel support.
   4.591 -
   4.592 -  Note that this has nothing to do with the network file systems NFS
   4.593 -  or Coda; you can say N here even if you intend to use NFS or Coda.
   4.594 -
   4.595 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.596 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.597 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
   4.598 -  will be called nbd.o.
   4.599 -
   4.600 -  If unsure, say N.
   4.601 -
   4.602 -XenoLinux virtual block device support
   4.603 -CONFIG_XEN_VBD
   4.604 -  Xen can export virtual block devices which map back to extents of
   4.605 -  blocks on the physical partitions.  This option is needed for
   4.606 -  Linux to make use of such devices when running as a Xen guest.
   4.607 -
   4.608 -  If unsure, say Y.
   4.609 -
   4.610 -Per partition statistics in /proc/partitions
   4.611 -CONFIG_BLK_STATS
   4.612 -  If you say yes here, your kernel will keep statistical information
   4.613 -  for every partition. The information includes things as numbers of
   4.614 -  read and write accesses, the number of merged requests etc.
   4.615 -
   4.616 -  This is required for the full functionality of sar(8) and interesting
   4.617 -  if you want to do performance tuning, by tweaking the elevator, e.g.
   4.618 -
   4.619 -  If unsure, say N.
   4.620 -
   4.621 -ATA/IDE/MFM/RLL support
   4.622 -CONFIG_IDE
   4.623 -  If you say Y here, your kernel will be able to manage low cost mass
   4.624 -  storage units such as ATA/(E)IDE and ATAPI units. The most common
   4.625 -  cases are IDE hard drives and ATAPI CD-ROM drives.
   4.626 -
   4.627 -  If your system is pure SCSI and doesn't use these interfaces, you
   4.628 -  can say N here.
   4.629 -
   4.630 -  Integrated Disk Electronics (IDE aka ATA-1) is a connecting standard
   4.631 -  for mass storage units such as hard disks. It was designed by
   4.632 -  Western Digital and Compaq Computer in 1984. It was then named
   4.633 -  ST506. Quite a number of disks use the IDE interface.
   4.634 -
   4.635 -  AT Attachment (ATA) is the superset of the IDE specifications.
   4.636 -  ST506 was also called ATA-1.
   4.637 -
   4.638 -  Fast-IDE is ATA-2 (also named Fast ATA), Enhanced IDE (EIDE) is
   4.639 -  ATA-3. It provides support for larger disks (up to 8.4GB by means of
   4.640 -  the LBA standard), more disks (4 instead of 2) and for other mass
   4.641 -  storage units such as tapes and cdrom. UDMA/33 (aka UltraDMA/33) is
   4.642 -  ATA-4 and provides faster (and more CPU friendly) transfer modes
   4.643 -  than previous PIO (Programmed processor Input/Output) from previous
   4.644 -  ATA/IDE standards by means of fast DMA controllers.
   4.645 -
   4.646 -  ATA Packet Interface (ATAPI) is a protocol used by EIDE tape and
   4.647 -  CD-ROM drives, similar in many respects to the SCSI protocol.
   4.648 -
   4.649 -  SMART IDE (Self Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) was
   4.650 -  designed in order to prevent data corruption and disk crash by
   4.651 -  detecting pre hardware failure conditions (heat, access time, and
   4.652 -  the like...). Disks built since June 1995 may follow this standard.
   4.653 -  The kernel itself don't manage this; however there are quite a
   4.654 -  number of user programs such as smart that can query the status of
   4.655 -  SMART parameters disk.
   4.656 -
   4.657 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.658 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.659 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
   4.660 -  will be called ide.o.
   4.661 -
   4.662 -  For further information, please read <file:Documentation/ide.txt>.
   4.663 -
   4.664 -  If unsure, say Y.
   4.665 -
   4.666 -Enhanced IDE/MFM/RLL disk/cdrom/tape/floppy support
   4.667 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE
   4.668 -  If you say Y here, you will use the full-featured IDE driver to
   4.669 -  control up to ten ATA/IDE interfaces, each being able to serve a
   4.670 -  "master" and a "slave" device, for a total of up to twenty ATA/IDE
   4.671 -  disk/cdrom/tape/floppy drives.
   4.672 -
   4.673 -  Useful information about large (>540 MB) IDE disks, multiple
   4.674 -  interfaces, what to do if ATA/IDE devices are not automatically
   4.675 -  detected, sound card ATA/IDE ports, module support, and other
   4.676 -  topics, is contained in <file:Documentation/ide.txt>. For detailed
   4.677 -  information about hard drives, consult the Disk-HOWTO and the
   4.678 -  Multi-Disk-HOWTO, available from
   4.679 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
   4.680 -
   4.681 -  To fine-tune ATA/IDE drive/interface parameters for improved
   4.682 -  performance, look for the hdparm package at
   4.683 -  <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/hardware/>.
   4.684 -
   4.685 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.686 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.687 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
   4.688 -  <file:Documentation/ide.txt>. The module will be called ide-mod.o.
   4.689 -  Do not compile this driver as a module if your root file system (the
   4.690 -  one containing the directory /) is located on an IDE device.
   4.691 -
   4.692 -  If you have one or more IDE drives, say Y or M here. If your system
   4.693 -  has no IDE drives, or if memory requirements are really tight, you
   4.694 -  could say N here, and select the "Old hard disk driver" below
   4.695 -  instead to save about 13 KB of memory in the kernel.
   4.696 -
   4.697 -Old hard disk (MFM/RLL/IDE) driver
   4.698 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HD_ONLY
   4.699 -  There are two drivers for MFM/RLL/IDE hard disks. Most people use
   4.700 -  the newer enhanced driver, but this old one is still around for two
   4.701 -  reasons. Some older systems have strange timing problems and seem to
   4.702 -  work only with the old driver (which itself does not work with some
   4.703 -  newer systems). The other reason is that the old driver is smaller,
   4.704 -  since it lacks the enhanced functionality of the new one. This makes
   4.705 -  it a good choice for systems with very tight memory restrictions, or
   4.706 -  for systems with only older MFM/RLL/ESDI drives. Choosing the old
   4.707 -  driver can save 13 KB or so of kernel memory.
   4.708 -
   4.709 -  If you are unsure, then just choose the Enhanced IDE/MFM/RLL driver
   4.710 -  instead of this one. For more detailed information, read the
   4.711 -  Disk-HOWTO, available from
   4.712 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
   4.713 -
   4.714 -Use old disk-only driver on primary interface
   4.715 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HD_IDE
   4.716 -  There are two drivers for MFM/RLL/IDE disks.  Most people use just
   4.717 -  the new enhanced driver by itself.  This option however installs the
   4.718 -  old hard disk driver to control the primary IDE/disk interface in
   4.719 -  the system, leaving the new enhanced IDE driver to take care of only
   4.720 -  the 2nd/3rd/4th IDE interfaces.  Doing this will prevent you from
   4.721 -  having an IDE/ATAPI CD-ROM or tape drive connected to the primary
   4.722 -  IDE interface.  Choosing this option may be useful for older systems
   4.723 -  which have MFM/RLL/ESDI controller+drives at the primary port
   4.724 -  address (0x1f0), along with IDE drives at the secondary/3rd/4th port
   4.725 -  addresses.
   4.726 -
   4.727 -  Normally, just say N here; you will then use the new driver for all
   4.728 -  4 interfaces.
   4.729 -
   4.730 -Include IDE/ATA-2 DISK support
   4.731 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDISK
   4.732 -  This will include enhanced support for MFM/RLL/IDE hard disks.  If
   4.733 -  you have a MFM/RLL/IDE disk, and there is no special reason to use
   4.734 -  the old hard disk driver instead, say Y.  If you have an SCSI-only
   4.735 -  system, you can say N here.
   4.736 -
   4.737 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.738 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.739 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
   4.740 -  will be called ide-disk.o.  Do not compile this driver as a module
   4.741 -  if your root file system (the one containing the directory /) is
   4.742 -  located on the IDE disk. If unsure, say Y.
   4.743 -
   4.744 -Use multi-mode by default
   4.745 -CONFIG_IDEDISK_MULTI_MODE
   4.746 -  If you get this error, try to say Y here:
   4.747 -
   4.748 -  hda: set_multmode: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete Error }
   4.749 -  hda: set_multmode: error=0x04 { DriveStatusError }
   4.750 -
   4.751 -  If in doubt, say N.
   4.752 -
   4.753 -PCMCIA IDE support
   4.754 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDECS
   4.755 -  Support for outboard IDE disks, tape drives, and CD-ROM drives
   4.756 -  connected through a  PCMCIA card.
   4.757 -
   4.758 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
   4.759 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
   4.760 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
   4.761 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
   4.762 -  ide-cs.o
   4.763 -
   4.764 -Include IDE/ATAPI CD-ROM support
   4.765 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDECD
   4.766 -  If you have a CD-ROM drive using the ATAPI protocol, say Y. ATAPI is
   4.767 -  a newer protocol used by IDE CD-ROM and TAPE drives, similar to the
   4.768 -  SCSI protocol. Most new CD-ROM drives use ATAPI, including the
   4.769 -  NEC-260, Mitsumi FX400, Sony 55E, and just about all non-SCSI
   4.770 -  double(2X) or better speed drives.
   4.771 -
   4.772 -  If you say Y here, the CD-ROM drive will be identified at boot time
   4.773 -  along with other IDE devices, as "hdb" or "hdc", or something
   4.774 -  similar (check the boot messages with dmesg). If this is your only
   4.775 -  CD-ROM drive, you can say N to all other CD-ROM options, but be sure
   4.776 -  to say Y or M to "ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system support".
   4.777 -
   4.778 -  Note that older versions of LILO (LInux LOader) cannot properly deal
   4.779 -  with IDE/ATAPI CD-ROMs, so install LILO 16 or higher, available from
   4.780 -  <ftp://brun.dyndns.org/pub/linux/lilo/>.
   4.781 -
   4.782 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.783 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.784 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
   4.785 -  will be called ide-cd.o.
   4.786 -
   4.787 -Include IDE/ATAPI TAPE support
   4.788 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDETAPE
   4.789 -  If you have an IDE tape drive using the ATAPI protocol, say Y.
   4.790 -  ATAPI is a newer protocol used by IDE tape and CD-ROM drives,
   4.791 -  similar to the SCSI protocol.  If you have an SCSI tape drive
   4.792 -  however, you can say N here.
   4.793 -
   4.794 -  You should also say Y if you have an OnStream DI-30 tape drive; this
   4.795 -  will not work with the SCSI protocol, until there is support for the
   4.796 -  SC-30 and SC-50 versions.
   4.797 -
   4.798 -  If you say Y here, the tape drive will be identified at boot time
   4.799 -  along with other IDE devices, as "hdb" or "hdc", or something
   4.800 -  similar, and will be mapped to a character device such as "ht0"
   4.801 -  (check the boot messages with dmesg).  Be sure to consult the
   4.802 -  <file:drivers/ide/ide-tape.c> and <file:Documentation/ide.txt> files
   4.803 -  for usage information.
   4.804 -
   4.805 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.806 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.807 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
   4.808 -  will be called ide-tape.o.
   4.809 -
   4.810 -Include IDE/ATAPI FLOPPY support
   4.811 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEFLOPPY
   4.812 -  If you have an IDE floppy drive which uses the ATAPI protocol,
   4.813 -  answer Y.  ATAPI is a newer protocol used by IDE CD-ROM/tape/floppy
   4.814 -  drives, similar to the SCSI protocol.
   4.815 -
   4.816 -  The LS-120 and the IDE/ATAPI Iomega ZIP drive are also supported by
   4.817 -  this driver. For information about jumper settings and the question
   4.818 -  of when a ZIP drive uses a partition table, see
   4.819 -  <http://www.win.tue.nl/~aeb/linux/zip/zip-1.html>.
   4.820 -  (ATAPI PD-CD/CDR drives are not supported by this driver; support
   4.821 -  for PD-CD/CDR drives is available if you answer Y to
   4.822 -  "SCSI emulation support", below).
   4.823 -
   4.824 -  If you say Y here, the FLOPPY drive will be identified along with
   4.825 -  other IDE devices, as "hdb" or "hdc", or something similar (check
   4.826 -  the boot messages with dmesg).
   4.827 -
   4.828 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
   4.829 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
   4.830 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
   4.831 -  will be called ide-floppy.o.
   4.832 -
   4.833 -AWARD Bios Work-Around
   4.834 -CONFIG_IDEDISK_STROKE
   4.835 -  Should you have a system w/ an AWARD Bios and your drives are larger
   4.836 -  than 32GB and it will not boot, one is required to perform a few OEM
   4.837 -  operations first.  The option is called "STROKE" because it allows
   4.838 -  one to "soft clip" the drive to work around a barrier limit.  For
   4.839 -  Maxtor drives it is called "jumpon.exe".  Please search Maxtor's
   4.840 -  web-site for "JUMPON.EXE".  IBM has a similar tool at:
   4.841 -  <http://www.storage.ibm.com/hdd/support/download.htm>.
   4.842 -
   4.843 -  If you are unsure, say N here.
   4.844 -
   4.845 -Raw Access to Media
   4.846 -CONFIG_IDE_TASK_IOCTL
   4.847 -  This is a direct raw access to the media.  It is a complex but
   4.848 -  elegant solution to test and validate the domain of the hardware and
   4.849 -  perform below the driver data recover if needed.  This is the most
   4.850 -  basic form of media-forensics.
   4.851 -
   4.852 -  If you are unsure, say N here.
   4.853 -
   4.854 -Use Taskfile I/O
   4.855 -CONFIG_IDE_TASKFILE_IO
   4.856 -  This is the "Jewel" of the patch.  It will go away and become the new
   4.857 -  driver core.  Since all the chipsets/host side hardware deal w/ their
   4.858 -  exceptions in "their local code" currently, adoption of a
   4.859 -  standardized data-transport is the only logical solution.
   4.860 -  Additionally we packetize the requests and gain rapid performance and
   4.861 -  a reduction in system latency.  Additionally by using a memory struct
   4.862 -  for the commands we can redirect to a MMIO host hardware in the next
   4.863 -  generation of controllers, specifically second generation Ultra133
   4.864 -  and Serial ATA.
   4.865 -
   4.866 -  Since this is a major transition, it was deemed necessary to make the
   4.867 -  driver paths buildable in separate models.  Therefore if using this
   4.868 -  option fails for your arch then we need to address the needs for that
   4.869 -  arch.
   4.870 -
   4.871 -  If you want to test this functionality, say Y here.
   4.872 -
   4.873 -Force DMA
   4.874 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_FORCED
   4.875 -  This is an old piece of lost code from Linux 2.0 Kernels.
   4.876 -
   4.877 -  Generally say N here.
   4.878 -
   4.879 -DMA Only on Disks
   4.880 -CONFIG_IDEDMA_ONLYDISK
   4.881 -  This is used if you know your ATAPI Devices are going to fail DMA
   4.882 -  Transfers.
   4.883 -
   4.884 -  Generally say N here.
   4.885 -
   4.886 -SCSI emulation support
   4.887 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDESCSI
   4.888 -  This will provide SCSI host adapter emulation for IDE ATAPI devices,
   4.889 -  and will allow you to use a SCSI device driver instead of a native
   4.890 -  ATAPI driver.
   4.891 -
   4.892 -  This is useful if you have an ATAPI device for which no native
   4.893 -  driver has been written (for example, an ATAPI PD-CD or CDR drive);
   4.894 -  you can then use this emulation together with an appropriate SCSI
   4.895 -  device driver. In order to do this, say Y here and to "SCSI support"
   4.896 -  and "SCSI generic support", below. You must then provide the kernel
   4.897 -  command line "hdx=scsi" (try "man bootparam" or see the
   4.898 -  documentation of your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to
   4.899 -  pass options to the kernel at boot time) for devices if you want the
   4.900 -  native EIDE sub-drivers to skip over the native support, so that
   4.901 -  this SCSI emulation can be used instead. This is required for use of
   4.902 -  CD-RW's.
   4.903 -
   4.904 -  Note that this option does NOT allow you to attach SCSI devices to a
   4.905 -  box that doesn't have a SCSI host adapter installed.
   4.906 -
   4.907 -  If both this SCSI emulation and native ATAPI support are compiled
   4.908 -  into the kernel, the native support will be used.
   4.909 -
   4.910 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
   4.911 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
   4.912 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
   4.913 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
   4.914 -  ide-scsi.o
   4.915 -
   4.916 -Use the NOOP Elevator (WARNING)
   4.917 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ELEVATOR_NOOP
   4.918 -  If you are using a raid class top-level driver above the ATA/IDE core,
   4.919 -  one may find a performance boost by preventing a merging and re-sorting
   4.920 -  of the new requests.
   4.921 -
   4.922 -  If unsure, say N.
   4.923 -
   4.924 -ISA-PNP EIDE support
   4.925 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ISAPNP
   4.926 -  If you have an ISA EIDE card that is PnP (Plug and Play) and
   4.927 -  requires setup first before scanning for devices, say Y here.
   4.928 -
   4.929 -  If unsure, say N.
   4.930 -
   4.931 -CMD640 chipset bugfix/support
   4.932 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CMD640
   4.933 -  The CMD-Technologies CMD640 IDE chip is used on many common 486 and
   4.934 -  Pentium motherboards, usually in combination with a "Neptune" or
   4.935 -  "SiS" chipset. Unfortunately, it has a number of rather nasty
   4.936 -  design flaws that can cause severe data corruption under many common
   4.937 -  conditions. Say Y here to include code which tries to automatically
   4.938 -  detect and correct the problems under Linux. This option also
   4.939 -  enables access to the secondary IDE ports in some CMD640 based
   4.940 -  systems.
   4.941 -
   4.942 -  This driver will work automatically in PCI based systems (most new
   4.943 -  systems have PCI slots). But if your system uses VESA local bus
   4.944 -  (VLB) instead of PCI, you must also supply a kernel boot parameter
   4.945 -  to enable the CMD640 bugfix/support: "ide0=cmd640_vlb". (Try "man
   4.946 -  bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader about how to
   4.947 -  pass options to the kernel.)
   4.948 -
   4.949 -  The CMD640 chip is also used on add-in cards by Acculogic, and on
   4.950 -  the "CSA-6400E PCI to IDE controller" that some people have. For
   4.951 -  details, read <file:Documentation/ide.txt>.
   4.952 -
   4.953 -CMD640 enhanced support
   4.954 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CMD640_ENHANCED
   4.955 -  This option includes support for setting/autotuning PIO modes and
   4.956 -  prefetch on CMD640 IDE interfaces.  For details, read
   4.957 -  <file:Documentation/ide.txt>. If you have a CMD640 IDE interface
   4.958 -  and your BIOS does not already do this for you, then say Y here.
   4.959 -  Otherwise say N.
   4.960 -
   4.961 -RZ1000 chipset bugfix/support
   4.962 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RZ1000
   4.963 -  The PC-Technologies RZ1000 IDE chip is used on many common 486 and
   4.964 -  Pentium motherboards, usually along with the "Neptune" chipset.
   4.965 -  Unfortunately, it has a rather nasty design flaw that can cause
   4.966 -  severe data corruption under many conditions. Say Y here to include
   4.967 -  code which automatically detects and corrects the problem under
   4.968 -  Linux. This may slow disk throughput by a few percent, but at least
   4.969 -  things will operate 100% reliably.
   4.970 -
   4.971 -Generic PCI IDE chipset support
   4.972 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEPCI
   4.973 -  Say Y here for PCI systems which use IDE drive(s).
   4.974 -  This option helps the IDE driver to automatically detect and
   4.975 -  configure all PCI-based IDE interfaces in your system.
   4.976 -
   4.977 -Support for sharing PCI IDE interrupts
   4.978 -CONFIG_IDEPCI_SHARE_IRQ
   4.979 -  Some ATA/IDE chipsets have hardware support which allows for
   4.980 -  sharing a single IRQ with other cards. To enable support for
   4.981 -  this in the ATA/IDE driver, say Y here.
   4.982 -
   4.983 -  It is safe to say Y to this question, in most cases.
   4.984 -  If unsure, say N.
   4.985 -
   4.986 -Generic PCI bus-master DMA support
   4.987 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_PCI
   4.988 -  If your PCI system uses IDE drive(s) (as opposed to SCSI, say) and
   4.989 -  is capable of bus-master DMA operation (most Pentium PCI systems),
   4.990 -  you will want to say Y here to reduce CPU overhead. You can then use
   4.991 -  the "hdparm" utility to enable DMA for drives for which it was not
   4.992 -  enabled automatically. By default, DMA is not enabled automatically
   4.993 -  for these drives, but you can change that by saying Y to the
   4.994 -  following question "Use DMA by default when available". You can get
   4.995 -  the latest version of the hdparm utility from
   4.996 -  <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/hardware/>.
   4.997 -
   4.998 -  Read the comments at the beginning of <file:drivers/ide/ide-dma.c>
   4.999 -  and the file <file:Documentation/ide.txt> for more information.
  4.1000 -
  4.1001 -  It is safe to say Y to this question.
  4.1002 -
  4.1003 -Good-Bad DMA Model-Firmware (WIP)
  4.1004 -CONFIG_IDEDMA_NEW_DRIVE_LISTINGS
  4.1005 -  If you say Y here, the model and firmware revision of your drive
  4.1006 -  will be compared against a blacklist of buggy drives that claim to
  4.1007 -  be (U)DMA capable but aren't. This is a blanket on/off test with no
  4.1008 -  speed limit options.
  4.1009 -
  4.1010 -  Straight GNU GCC 2.7.3/2.8.X compilers are known to be safe;
  4.1011 -  whereas, many versions of EGCS have a problem and miscompile if you
  4.1012 -  say Y here.
  4.1013 -
  4.1014 -  If in doubt, say N.
  4.1015 -
  4.1016 -Attempt to HACK around Chipsets that TIMEOUT (WIP)
  4.1017 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_TIMEOUT
  4.1018 -  If you say Y here, this is a NASTY UGLY HACK!
  4.1019 -
  4.1020 -  We have to issue an abort and requeue the request DMA engine got
  4.1021 -  turned off by a goofy ASIC, and we have to clean up the mess, and
  4.1022 -  here is as good as any.  Do it globally for all chipsets.
  4.1023 -
  4.1024 -  If in doubt, say N.
  4.1025 -
  4.1026 -Boot off-board chipsets first support
  4.1027 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_OFFBOARD
  4.1028 -  Normally, IDE controllers built into the motherboard (on-board
  4.1029 -  controllers) are assigned to ide0 and ide1 while those on add-in PCI
  4.1030 -  cards (off-board controllers) are relegated to ide2 and ide3.
  4.1031 -  Answering Y here will allow you to reverse the situation, with
  4.1032 -  off-board controllers on ide0/1 and on-board controllers on ide2/3.
  4.1033 -  This can improve the usability of some boot managers such as lilo
  4.1034 -  when booting from a drive on an off-board controller.
  4.1035 -
  4.1036 -  If you say Y here, and you actually want to reverse the device scan
  4.1037 -  order as explained above, you also need to issue the kernel command
  4.1038 -  line option "ide=reverse". (Try "man bootparam" or see the
  4.1039 -  documentation of your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) about how to
  4.1040 -  pass options to the kernel at boot time.)
  4.1041 -
  4.1042 -  Note that, if you do this, the order of the hd* devices will be
  4.1043 -  rearranged which may require modification of fstab and other files.
  4.1044 -
  4.1045 -  If in doubt, say N.
  4.1046 -
  4.1047 -Use PCI DMA by default when available
  4.1048 -CONFIG_IDEDMA_PCI_AUTO
  4.1049 -  Prior to kernel version 2.1.112, Linux used to automatically use
  4.1050 -  DMA for IDE drives and chipsets which support it. Due to concerns
  4.1051 -  about a couple of cases where buggy hardware may have caused damage,
  4.1052 -  the default is now to NOT use DMA automatically. To revert to the
  4.1053 -  previous behaviour, say Y to this question.
  4.1054 -
  4.1055 -  If you suspect your hardware is at all flakey, say N here.
  4.1056 -  Do NOT email the IDE kernel people regarding this issue!
  4.1057 -
  4.1058 -  It is normally safe to answer Y to this question unless your
  4.1059 -  motherboard uses a VIA VP2 chipset, in which case you should say N.
  4.1060 -
  4.1061 -IGNORE word93 Validation BITS
  4.1062 -CONFIG_IDEDMA_IVB
  4.1063 -  There are unclear terms in ATA-4 and ATA-5 standards how certain
  4.1064 -  hardware (an 80c ribbon) should be detected. Different interpretations
  4.1065 -  of the standards have been released in hardware. This causes problems:
  4.1066 -  for example, a host with Ultra Mode 4 (or higher) will not run
  4.1067 -  in that mode with an 80c ribbon.
  4.1068 -
  4.1069 -  If you are experiencing compatibility or performance problems, you
  4.1070 -  MAY try to answering Y here. However, it does not necessarily solve
  4.1071 -  any of your problems, it could even cause more of them.
  4.1072 -
  4.1073 -  It is normally safe to answer Y; however, the default is N.
  4.1074 -
  4.1075 -ATA Work(s) In Progress (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1076 -CONFIG_IDEDMA_PCI_WIP
  4.1077 -  If you enable this you will be able to use and test highly
  4.1078 -  developmental projects. If you say N, the configurator will
  4.1079 -  simply skip those options.
  4.1080 -
  4.1081 -  It is SAFEST to say N to this question.
  4.1082 -
  4.1083 -Asynchronous DMA support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1084 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ADMA
  4.1085 -  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1086 -  <file:drivers/ide/ide-adma.c>.
  4.1087 -
  4.1088 -Pacific Digital A-DMA support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1089 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC_ADMA
  4.1090 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/setup-pci.c>.
  4.1091 -
  4.1092 -3ware Hardware ATA-RAID support
  4.1093 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_3W_XXXX_RAID
  4.1094 -  3ware is the only hardware ATA-Raid product in Linux to date.
  4.1095 -  This card is 2,4, or 8 channel master mode support only.
  4.1096 -  SCSI support required!!!
  4.1097 -
  4.1098 -  <http://www.3ware.com/>
  4.1099 -
  4.1100 -  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1101 -  <file:drivers/scsi/3w-xxxx.c>.
  4.1102 -
  4.1103 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.1104 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.1105 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.1106 -  will be called 3w-xxxx.o.
  4.1107 -
  4.1108 -AEC62XX chipset support
  4.1109 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_AEC62XX
  4.1110 -  This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
  4.1111 -  interrupt. This add-on card is a bootable PCI UDMA controller. In
  4.1112 -  order to get this card to initialize correctly in some cases, you
  4.1113 -  should say Y here, and preferably also to "Use DMA by default when
  4.1114 -  available".
  4.1115 -
  4.1116 -  The ATP850U/UF is an UltraDMA 33 chipset base.
  4.1117 -  The ATP860 is an UltraDMA 66 chipset base.
  4.1118 -  The ATP860M(acintosh) version is an UltraDMA 66 chipset base.
  4.1119 -
  4.1120 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/aec62xx.c>.
  4.1121 -  If you say Y here, then say Y to "Use DMA by default when available"
  4.1122 -  as well.
  4.1123 -
  4.1124 -AEC62XX Tuning support
  4.1125 -CONFIG_AEC62XX_TUNING
  4.1126 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/aec62xx.c>.
  4.1127 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1128 -
  4.1129 -ALI M15x3 chipset support
  4.1130 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ALI15X3
  4.1131 -  This driver ensures (U)DMA support for ALI 1533, 1543 and 1543C
  4.1132 -  onboard chipsets.  It also tests for Simplex mode and enables
  4.1133 -  normal dual channel support.
  4.1134 -
  4.1135 -  If you say Y here, you also need to say Y to "Use DMA by default
  4.1136 -  when available", above.  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1137 -  <file:drivers/ide/pci/alim15x3.c>.
  4.1138 -
  4.1139 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1140 -
  4.1141 -ALI M15x3 WDC support (DANGEROUS)
  4.1142 -CONFIG_WDC_ALI15X3
  4.1143 -  This allows for UltraDMA support for WDC drives that ignore CRC
  4.1144 -  checking. You are a fool for enabling this option, but there have
  4.1145 -  been requests. DO NOT COMPLAIN IF YOUR DRIVE HAS FS CORRUPTION, IF
  4.1146 -  YOU ENABLE THIS! No one will listen, just laugh for ignoring this
  4.1147 -  SERIOUS WARNING.
  4.1148 -
  4.1149 -  Using this option can allow WDC drives to run at ATA-4/5 transfer
  4.1150 -  rates with only an ATA-2 support structure.
  4.1151 -
  4.1152 -  SAY N!
  4.1153 -
  4.1154 -AMD and nVidia IDE support
  4.1155 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_AMD74XX
  4.1156 -  This driver adds explicit support for AMD-7xx and AMD-8111 chips
  4.1157 -  and also for the nVidia nForce chip.  This allows the kernel to
  4.1158 -  change PIO, DMA and UDMA speeds and to configure the chip to
  4.1159 -  optimum performance.
  4.1160 -
  4.1161 -  If you say Y here, you also need to say Y to "Use DMA by default
  4.1162 -  when available", above.
  4.1163 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/amd74xx.c>.
  4.1164 -
  4.1165 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1166 -
  4.1167 -AMD Viper ATA-66 Override support (WIP)
  4.1168 -CONFIG_AMD74XX_OVERRIDE
  4.1169 -  This option auto-forces the ata66 flag.
  4.1170 -  This effect can be also invoked by calling "idex=ata66"
  4.1171 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1172 -
  4.1173 -ATI IXP chipset IDE support
  4.1174 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATIIXP
  4.1175 -  This driver adds explicit support for ATI IXP chipset.
  4.1176 -  This allows the kernel to change PIO, DMA and UDMA speeds
  4.1177 -  and to configure the chip to optimum performance.
  4.1178 -
  4.1179 -  Say Y here if you have an ATI IXP chipset IDE controller.
  4.1180 -
  4.1181 -CMD64X/CMD680 chipset support
  4.1182 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CMD64X
  4.1183 -  Say Y here if you have an IDE controller which uses any of these
  4.1184 -  chipsets: CMD643, CMD646 and CMD648.
  4.1185 -
  4.1186 -Compaq Triflex IDE support
  4.1187 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_TRIFLEX
  4.1188 -  Say Y here if you have a Compaq Triflex IDE controller, such
  4.1189 -  as those commonly found on Compaq Pentium-Pro systems
  4.1190 -
  4.1191 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.1192 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.1193 -  triflex.o.
  4.1194 -
  4.1195 -CY82C693 chipset support
  4.1196 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CY82C693
  4.1197 -  This driver adds detection and support for the CY82C693 chipset
  4.1198 -  used on Digital's PC-Alpha 164SX boards.
  4.1199 -
  4.1200 -  If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default
  4.1201 -  when available" as well.
  4.1202 -
  4.1203 -Cyrix CS5530 MediaGX chipset support
  4.1204 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_CS5530
  4.1205 -  Include support for UDMA on the Cyrix MediaGX 5530 chipset. This
  4.1206 -  will automatically be detected and configured if found.
  4.1207 -
  4.1208 -  It is safe to say Y to this question.
  4.1209 -
  4.1210 -  People with SCSI-only systems should say N here. If unsure, say Y.
  4.1211 -
  4.1212 -HPT34X chipset support
  4.1213 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HPT34X
  4.1214 -  This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
  4.1215 -  interrupt. The HPT343 chipset in its current form is a non-bootable
  4.1216 -  controller; the HPT345/HPT363 chipset is a bootable (needs BIOS FIX)
  4.1217 -  PCI UDMA controllers. This driver requires dynamic tuning of the
  4.1218 -  chipset during the ide-probe at boot time. It is reported to support
  4.1219 -  DVD II drives, by the manufacturer.
  4.1220 -
  4.1221 -HPT34X AUTODMA support (WIP)
  4.1222 -CONFIG_HPT34X_AUTODMA
  4.1223 -  This is a dangerous thing to attempt currently! Please read the
  4.1224 -  comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/hpt34x.c>.  If you say Y
  4.1225 -  here, then say Y to "Use DMA by default when available" as well.
  4.1226 -
  4.1227 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1228 -
  4.1229 -HPT36X/37X chipset support
  4.1230 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HPT366
  4.1231 -  HPT366 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-66.
  4.1232 -  HPT368 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-66 RAID Based.
  4.1233 -  HPT370 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-100.
  4.1234 -  HPT372 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-133.
  4.1235 -  HPT374 is an Ultra DMA chipset for ATA-133.
  4.1236 -
  4.1237 -  This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
  4.1238 -  interrupt.
  4.1239 -
  4.1240 -  The HPT366 chipset in its current form is bootable. One solution
  4.1241 -  for this problem are special LILO commands for redirecting the
  4.1242 -  reference to device 0x80. The other solution is to say Y to "Boot
  4.1243 -  off-board chipsets first support" (CONFIG_BLK_DEV_OFFBOARD) unless
  4.1244 -  your mother board has the chipset natively mounted. Regardless one
  4.1245 -  should use the fore mentioned option and call at LILO or include
  4.1246 -  "ide=reverse" in LILO's append-line.
  4.1247 -
  4.1248 -  This driver requires dynamic tuning of the chipset during the
  4.1249 -  ide-probe at boot. It is reported to support DVD II drives, by the
  4.1250 -  manufacturer.
  4.1251 -
  4.1252 -NS87415 chipset support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1253 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_NS87415
  4.1254 -  This driver adds detection and support for the NS87415 chip
  4.1255 -  (used in SPARC64, among others).
  4.1256 -
  4.1257 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/ns87415.c>.
  4.1258 -
  4.1259 -OPTi 82C621 chipset enhanced support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1260 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_OPTI621
  4.1261 -  This is a driver for the OPTi 82C621 EIDE controller.
  4.1262 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/opti621.c>.
  4.1263 -
  4.1264 -National SCx200 chipset support
  4.1265 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SC1200
  4.1266 -  This driver adds support for the built in IDE on the National
  4.1267 -  SCx200 series of embedded x86 "Geode" systems
  4.1268 -
  4.1269 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.1270 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.1271 -  sc1200.o.
  4.1272 -
  4.1273 -ServerWorks OSB4/CSB5 chipset support
  4.1274 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SVWKS
  4.1275 -  This driver adds PIO/(U)DMA support for the ServerWorks OSB4/CSB5
  4.1276 -  chipsets.
  4.1277 -
  4.1278 -SGI IOC4 chipset support
  4.1279 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SGIIOC4
  4.1280 -  This driver adds PIO & MultiMode DMA-2 support for the SGI IOC4
  4.1281 -  chipset.  Please say Y here, if you have an Altix System from
  4.1282 -  Silicon Graphics Inc.
  4.1283 -
  4.1284 -Intel PIIXn chipsets support
  4.1285 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PIIX
  4.1286 -  This driver adds PIO mode setting and tuning for all PIIX IDE
  4.1287 -  controllers by Intel.  Since the BIOS can sometimes improperly tune
  4.1288 -  PIO 0-4 mode settings, this allows dynamic tuning of the chipset
  4.1289 -  via the standard end-user tool 'hdparm'.
  4.1290 -
  4.1291 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/piix.c>.
  4.1292 -
  4.1293 -  If you say Y here, you should also say Y to "PIIXn Tuning support",
  4.1294 -  below.
  4.1295 -
  4.1296 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1297 -
  4.1298 -PIIXn Tuning support
  4.1299 -CONFIG_PIIX_TUNING
  4.1300 -  This driver extension adds DMA mode setting and tuning for all PIIX
  4.1301 -  IDE controllers by Intel. Since the BIOS can sometimes improperly
  4.1302 -  set up the device/adapter combination and speed limits, it has
  4.1303 -  become a necessity to back/forward speed devices as needed.
  4.1304 -
  4.1305 -  Case 430HX/440FX PIIX3 need speed limits to reduce UDMA to DMA mode
  4.1306 -  2 if the BIOS can not perform this task at initialization.
  4.1307 -
  4.1308 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1309 -
  4.1310 -PROMISE PDC20246/PDC20262/PDC20265/PDC20267/PDC20268 support
  4.1311 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC202XX_OLD
  4.1312 -  Promise Ultra33 or PDC20246
  4.1313 -  Promise Ultra66 or PDC20262
  4.1314 -  Promise Ultra100 or PDC20265/PDC20267/PDC20268
  4.1315 -
  4.1316 -  This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
  4.1317 -  interrupt. This add-on card is a bootable PCI UDMA controller. Since
  4.1318 -  multiple cards can be installed and there are BIOS ROM problems that
  4.1319 -  happen if the BIOS revisions of all installed cards (three-max) do
  4.1320 -  not match, the driver attempts to do dynamic tuning of the chipset
  4.1321 -  at boot-time for max-speed.  Ultra33 BIOS 1.25 or newer is required
  4.1322 -  for more than one card. This card may require that you say Y to
  4.1323 -  "Special UDMA Feature".
  4.1324 -
  4.1325 -  If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
  4.1326 -  available" as well.
  4.1327 -
  4.1328 -  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1329 -  <file:drivers/ide/pci/pdc202xx_old.c>.
  4.1330 -
  4.1331 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1332 -
  4.1333 -PROMISE PDC202{68|69|70|71|75|76|77} support
  4.1334 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC202XX_NEW
  4.1335 -  Promise Ultra 100 TX2 [PDC20268]
  4.1336 -  Promise Ultra 133 PTX2 [PDC20269]
  4.1337 -  Promise FastTrak LP/TX2/TX4 [PDC20270]
  4.1338 -  Promise FastTrak TX2000 [PDC20271]
  4.1339 -  Promise MB Ultra 133 [PDC20275]
  4.1340 -  Promise MB FastTrak 133 [PDC20276]
  4.1341 -  Promise FastTrak 133 [PDC20277]
  4.1342 -
  4.1343 -  This driver adds up to 4 more EIDE devices sharing a single
  4.1344 -  interrupt. This device is a bootable PCI UDMA controller. Since
  4.1345 -  multiple cards can be installed and there are BIOS ROM problems that
  4.1346 -  happen if the BIOS revisions of all installed cards (max of five) do
  4.1347 -  not match, the driver attempts to do dynamic tuning of the chipset
  4.1348 -  at boot-time for max speed.  Ultra33 BIOS 1.25 or newer is required
  4.1349 -  for more than one card.
  4.1350 -
  4.1351 -  If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
  4.1352 -  available" as well.
  4.1353 -
  4.1354 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1355 -
  4.1356 -Special UDMA Feature
  4.1357 -CONFIG_PDC202XX_BURST
  4.1358 -  This option causes the pdc202xx driver to enable UDMA modes on the
  4.1359 -  PDC202xx even when the PDC202xx BIOS has not done so.
  4.1360 -
  4.1361 -  It was originally designed for the PDC20246/Ultra33, whose BIOS will
  4.1362 -  only setup UDMA on the first two PDC20246 cards.  It has also been
  4.1363 -  used successfully on a PDC20265/Ultra100, allowing use of UDMA modes
  4.1364 -  when the PDC20265 BIOS has been disabled (for faster boot up).
  4.1365 -
  4.1366 -  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1367 -  <file:drivers/ide/pci/pdc202xx_old.c>.
  4.1368 -
  4.1369 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1370 -
  4.1371 -Special FastTrak Feature
  4.1372 -CONFIG_PDC202XX_FORCE
  4.1373 -  For FastTrak enable overriding BIOS.
  4.1374 -
  4.1375 -SiS5513 chipset support
  4.1376 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SIS5513
  4.1377 -  This driver ensures (U)DMA support for SIS5513 chipset family based
  4.1378 -  mainboards.
  4.1379 -
  4.1380 -  The following chipsets are supported:
  4.1381 -  ATA16:  SiS5511, SiS5513
  4.1382 -  ATA33:  SiS5591, SiS5597, SiS5598, SiS5600
  4.1383 -  ATA66:  SiS530, SiS540, SiS620, SiS630, SiS640
  4.1384 -  ATA100: SiS635, SiS645, SiS650, SiS730, SiS735, SiS740,
  4.1385 -          SiS745, SiS750
  4.1386 -
  4.1387 -  If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
  4.1388 -  available" as well.
  4.1389 -
  4.1390 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/sis5513.c>.
  4.1391 -
  4.1392 -Silicon Image chipset support
  4.1393 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SIIMAGE
  4.1394 -  This driver provides (U)DMA support for the SII3112 SATA controllers and
  4.1395 -  for the CMD/SI680 UDMA/DMA ATA controller.
  4.1396 -
  4.1397 -SLC90E66 chipset support
  4.1398 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SLC90E66
  4.1399 -  This driver ensures (U)DMA support for Victroy66 SouthBridges for
  4.1400 -  SMsC with Intel NorthBridges.  This is an Ultra66 based chipset.
  4.1401 -  The nice thing about it is that you can mix Ultra/DMA/PIO devices
  4.1402 -  and it will handle timing cycles.  Since this is an improved
  4.1403 -  look-a-like to the PIIX4 it should be a nice addition.
  4.1404 -
  4.1405 -  If you say Y here, you need to say Y to "Use DMA by default when
  4.1406 -  available" as well.
  4.1407 -
  4.1408 -  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1409 -  <file:drivers/ide/pci/slc90e66.c>.
  4.1410 -
  4.1411 -Winbond SL82c105 support
  4.1412 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SL82C105
  4.1413 -  If you have a Winbond SL82c105 IDE controller, say Y here to enable
  4.1414 -  special configuration for this chip. This is common on various CHRP
  4.1415 -  motherboards, but could be used elsewhere. If in doubt, say Y.
  4.1416 -
  4.1417 -Tekram TRM290 chipset support
  4.1418 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_TRM290
  4.1419 -  This driver adds support for bus master DMA transfers
  4.1420 -  using the Tekram TRM290 PCI IDE chip. Volunteers are
  4.1421 -  needed for further tweaking and development.
  4.1422 -  Please read the comments at the top of <file:drivers/ide/pci/trm290.c>.
  4.1423 -
  4.1424 -VIA82CXXX chipset support
  4.1425 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_VIA82CXXX
  4.1426 -  This allows you to configure your chipset for a better use while
  4.1427 -  running PIO/(U)DMA, it will allow you to enable efficiently the
  4.1428 -  second channel dma usage, as it may not be set by BIOS.  It will try
  4.1429 -  to set fifo configuration at its best.  It will allow you to get
  4.1430 -  information from /proc/ide/via provided you enabled "/proc file
  4.1431 -  system" support.
  4.1432 -
  4.1433 -  Please read the comments at the top of
  4.1434 -  <file:drivers/ide/pci/via82cxxx.c>.
  4.1435 -
  4.1436 -  If you say Y here, then say Y to "Use DMA by default when available"
  4.1437 -  as well.
  4.1438 -
  4.1439 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1440 -
  4.1441 -RapIDE interface support
  4.1442 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_RAPIDE
  4.1443 -  Say Y here if you want to support the Yellowstone RapIDE controller
  4.1444 -  manufactured for use with Acorn computers.
  4.1445 -
  4.1446 -Other IDE chipset support
  4.1447 -CONFIG_IDE_CHIPSETS
  4.1448 -  Say Y here if you want to include enhanced support for various IDE
  4.1449 -  interface chipsets used on motherboards and add-on cards. You can
  4.1450 -  then pick your particular IDE chip from among the following options.
  4.1451 -  This enhanced support may be necessary for Linux to be able to
  4.1452 -  access the 3rd/4th drives in some systems. It may also enable
  4.1453 -  setting of higher speed I/O rates to improve system performance with
  4.1454 -  these chipsets. Most of these also require special kernel boot
  4.1455 -  parameters to actually turn on the support at runtime; you can find
  4.1456 -  a list of these in the file <file:Documentation/ide.txt>.
  4.1457 -
  4.1458 -  People with SCSI-only systems can say N here.
  4.1459 -
  4.1460 -Generic 4 drives/port support
  4.1461 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_4DRIVES
  4.1462 -  Certain older chipsets, including the Tekram 690CD, use a single set
  4.1463 -  of I/O ports at 0x1f0 to control up to four drives, instead of the
  4.1464 -  customary two drives per port. Support for this can be enabled at
  4.1465 -  runtime using the "ide0=four" kernel boot parameter if you say Y
  4.1466 -  here.
  4.1467 -
  4.1468 -ALI M14xx support
  4.1469 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ALI14XX
  4.1470 -  This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=ali14xx" kernel
  4.1471 -  boot parameter.  It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
  4.1472 -  of the ALI M1439/1443/1445/1487/1489 chipsets, and permits faster
  4.1473 -  I/O speeds to be set as well.  See the files
  4.1474 -  <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and <file:drivers/ide/legacy/ali14xx.c> for
  4.1475 -  more info.
  4.1476 -
  4.1477 -DTC-2278 support
  4.1478 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_DTC2278
  4.1479 -  This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=dtc2278" kernel
  4.1480 -  boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
  4.1481 -  of the DTC-2278 card, and permits faster I/O speeds to be set as
  4.1482 -  well. See the <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and
  4.1483 -  <file:drivers/ide/legacy/dtc2278.c> files for more info.
  4.1484 -
  4.1485 -Holtek HT6560B support
  4.1486 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_HT6560B
  4.1487 -  This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=ht6560b" kernel
  4.1488 -  boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
  4.1489 -  of the Holtek card, and permits faster I/O speeds to be set as well.
  4.1490 -  See the <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and
  4.1491 -  <file:drivers/ide/legacy/ht6560b.c> files for more info.
  4.1492 -
  4.1493 -PROMISE DC4030 support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1494 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PDC4030
  4.1495 -  This driver provides support for the secondary IDE interface and
  4.1496 -  cache of Promise IDE chipsets, e.g. DC4030 and DC5030.  This driver
  4.1497 -  is known to incur timeouts/retries during heavy I/O to drives
  4.1498 -  attached to the secondary interface.  CD-ROM and TAPE devices are
  4.1499 -  not supported yet.  This driver is enabled at runtime using the
  4.1500 -  "ide0=dc4030" kernel boot parameter.  See the
  4.1501 -  <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and <file:drivers/ide/legacy/pdc4030.c> files
  4.1502 -  for more info.
  4.1503 -
  4.1504 -QDI QD65XX support
  4.1505 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_QD65XX
  4.1506 -  This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=qd65xx" kernel
  4.1507 -  boot parameter.  It permits faster I/O speeds to be set.  See the
  4.1508 -  <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and <file:drivers/ide/legacy/qd65xx.c> for
  4.1509 -  more info.
  4.1510 -
  4.1511 -UMC 8672 support
  4.1512 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_UMC8672
  4.1513 -  This driver is enabled at runtime using the "ide0=umc8672" kernel
  4.1514 -  boot parameter. It enables support for the secondary IDE interface
  4.1515 -  of the UMC-8672, and permits faster I/O speeds to be set as well.
  4.1516 -  See the files <file:Documentation/ide.txt> and
  4.1517 -  <file:drivers/ide/legacy/umc8672.c> for more info.
  4.1518 -
  4.1519 -Amiga Gayle IDE interface support
  4.1520 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_GAYLE
  4.1521 -  This is the IDE driver for the Amiga Gayle IDE interface. It supports
  4.1522 -  both the `A1200 style' and `A4000 style' of the Gayle IDE interface,
  4.1523 -  This includes builtin IDE interfaces on some Amiga models (A600,
  4.1524 -  A1200, A4000, and A4000T), and IDE interfaces on the Zorro expansion
  4.1525 -  bus (M-Tech E-Matrix 530 expansion card).
  4.1526 -  Say Y if you have an Amiga with a Gayle IDE interface and want to use
  4.1527 -  IDE devices (hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected to it.
  4.1528 -  Note that you also have to enable Zorro bus support if you want to
  4.1529 -  use Gayle IDE interfaces on the Zorro expansion bus.
  4.1530 -
  4.1531 -Falcon IDE interface support
  4.1532 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_FALCON_IDE
  4.1533 -  This is the IDE driver for the builtin IDE interface on the Atari
  4.1534 -  Falcon. Say Y if you have a Falcon and want to use IDE devices (hard
  4.1535 -  disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected to the builtin IDE
  4.1536 -  interface.
  4.1537 -
  4.1538 -Amiga Buddha/Catweasel/X-Surf IDE interface support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1539 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_BUDDHA
  4.1540 -  This is the IDE driver for the IDE interfaces on the Buddha, 
  4.1541 -  Catweasel and X-Surf expansion boards.  It supports up to two interfaces 
  4.1542 -  on the Buddha, three on the Catweasel and two on the X-Surf.
  4.1543 -
  4.1544 -  Say Y if you have a Buddha or Catweasel expansion board and want to
  4.1545 -  use IDE devices (hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected
  4.1546 -  to one of its IDE interfaces.
  4.1547 -
  4.1548 -Amiga IDE Doubler support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.1549 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDOUBLER
  4.1550 -  This driver provides support for the so-called `IDE doublers' (made
  4.1551 -  by various manufacturers, e.g. Eyetech) that can be connected to the
  4.1552 -  builtin IDE interface of some Amiga models. Using such an IDE
  4.1553 -  doubler, you can connect up to four instead of two IDE devices on
  4.1554 -  the Amiga's builtin IDE interface.
  4.1555 -
  4.1556 -  Note that the normal Amiga Gayle IDE driver may not work correctly
  4.1557 -  if you have an IDE doubler and don't enable this driver!
  4.1558 -
  4.1559 -  Say Y if you have an IDE doubler.  The driver is enabled at kernel
  4.1560 -  runtime using the "ide=doubler" kernel boot parameter.
  4.1561 -
  4.1562 -Builtin PowerMac IDE support
  4.1563 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_PMAC
  4.1564 -  This driver provides support for the built-in IDE controller on
  4.1565 -  most of the recent Apple Power Macintoshes and PowerBooks.
  4.1566 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.1567 -
  4.1568 -PowerMac IDE DMA support
  4.1569 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_PMAC
  4.1570 -  This option allows the driver for the built-in IDE controller on
  4.1571 -  Power Macintoshes and PowerBooks to use DMA (direct memory access)
  4.1572 -  to transfer data to and from memory.  Saying Y is safe and improves
  4.1573 -  performance.
  4.1574 -
  4.1575 -Broadcom SiByte onboard IDE support
  4.1576 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_SIBYTE
  4.1577 -  Include the driver for on-board IDE on the SiByte Generic Bus.  Note
  4.1578 -  that this limits the number of IDE devices to 4 (ide0...ide3).
  4.1579 -
  4.1580 -Use DMA by default
  4.1581 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_PMAC_AUTO
  4.1582 -  This option allows the driver for the built-in IDE controller on
  4.1583 -  Power Macintoshes and PowerBooks to use DMA automatically, without
  4.1584 -  it having to be explicitly enabled.  This option is provided because
  4.1585 -  of concerns about a couple of cases where using DMA on buggy PC
  4.1586 -  hardware may have caused damage.  Saying Y should be safe on all
  4.1587 -  Apple machines.
  4.1588 -
  4.1589 -Macintosh Quadra/Powerbook IDE interface support
  4.1590 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_MAC_IDE
  4.1591 -  This is the IDE driver for the builtin IDE interface on some m68k
  4.1592 -  Macintosh models. It supports both the `Quadra style' (used in
  4.1593 -  Quadra/ Centris 630 and Performa 588 models) and `Powerbook style'
  4.1594 -  (used in the Powerbook 150 and 190 models) IDE interface.
  4.1595 -
  4.1596 -  Say Y if you have such an Macintosh model and want to use IDE
  4.1597 -  devices (hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.) that are connected to the
  4.1598 -  builtin IDE interface.
  4.1599 -
  4.1600 -ICS IDE interface support
  4.1601 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDE_ICSIDE
  4.1602 -  On Acorn systems, say Y here if you wish to use the ICS IDE
  4.1603 -  interface card.  This is not required for ICS partition support.
  4.1604 -  If you are unsure, say N to this.
  4.1605 -
  4.1606 -ICS DMA support
  4.1607 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_IDEDMA_ICS
  4.1608 -  Say Y here if you want to add DMA (Direct Memory Access) support to
  4.1609 -  the ICS IDE driver.
  4.1610 -
  4.1611 -Use ICS DMA by default
  4.1612 -CONFIG_IDEDMA_ICS_AUTO
  4.1613 -  Prior to kernel version 2.1.112, Linux used to automatically use
  4.1614 -  DMA for IDE drives and chipsets which support it. Due to concerns
  4.1615 -  about a couple of cases where buggy hardware may have caused damage,
  4.1616 -  the default is now to NOT use DMA automatically. To revert to the
  4.1617 -  previous behaviour, say Y to this question.
  4.1618 -
  4.1619 -  If you suspect your hardware is at all flakey, say N here.
  4.1620 -  Do NOT email the IDE kernel people regarding this issue!
  4.1621 -
  4.1622 -XT hard disk support
  4.1623 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_XD
  4.1624 -  Very old 8 bit hard disk controllers used in the IBM XT computer
  4.1625 -  will be supported if you say Y here.
  4.1626 -
  4.1627 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.1628 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.1629 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module
  4.1630 -  will be called xd.o.
  4.1631 -
  4.1632 -  It's pretty unlikely that you have one of these: say N.
  4.1633 -
  4.1634 -PS/2 ESDI hard disk support
  4.1635 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_PS2
  4.1636 -  Say Y here if you have a PS/2 machine with a MCA bus and an ESDI
  4.1637 -  hard disk.
  4.1638 -
  4.1639 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.1640 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.1641 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.1642 -  will be called ps2esdi.o.
  4.1643 -
  4.1644 -Mylex DAC960/DAC1100 PCI RAID Controller support
  4.1645 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_DAC960
  4.1646 -  This driver adds support for the Mylex DAC960, AcceleRAID, and
  4.1647 -  eXtremeRAID PCI RAID controllers.  See the file
  4.1648 -  <file:Documentation/README.DAC960> for further information about
  4.1649 -  this driver.
  4.1650 -
  4.1651 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.1652 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.1653 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.1654 -  will be called DAC960.o.
  4.1655 -
  4.1656 -Parallel port IDE device support
  4.1657 -CONFIG_PARIDE
  4.1658 -  There are many external CD-ROM and disk devices that connect through
  4.1659 -  your computer's parallel port. Most of them are actually IDE devices
  4.1660 -  using a parallel port IDE adapter. This option enables the PARIDE
  4.1661 -  subsystem which contains drivers for many of these external drives.
  4.1662 -  Read <file:Documentation/paride.txt> for more information.
  4.1663 -
  4.1664 -  If you have said Y to the "Parallel-port support" configuration
  4.1665 -  option, you may share a single port between your printer and other
  4.1666 -  parallel port devices. Answer Y to build PARIDE support into your
  4.1667 -  kernel, or M if you would like to build it as a loadable module. If
  4.1668 -  your parallel port support is in a loadable module, you must build
  4.1669 -  PARIDE as a module. If you built PARIDE support into your kernel,
  4.1670 -  you may still build the individual protocol modules and high-level
  4.1671 -  drivers as loadable modules. If you build this support as a module,
  4.1672 -  it will be called paride.o.
  4.1673 -
  4.1674 -  To use the PARIDE support, you must say Y or M here and also to at
  4.1675 -  least one high-level driver (e.g. "Parallel port IDE disks",
  4.1676 -  "Parallel port ATAPI CD-ROMs", "Parallel port ATAPI disks" etc.) and
  4.1677 -  to at least one protocol driver (e.g. "ATEN EH-100 protocol",
  4.1678 -  "MicroSolutions backpack protocol", "DataStor Commuter protocol"
  4.1679 -  etc.).
  4.1680 -
  4.1681 -Parallel port IDE disks
  4.1682 -CONFIG_PARIDE_PD
  4.1683 -  This option enables the high-level driver for IDE-type disk devices
  4.1684 -  connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
  4.1685 -  support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
  4.1686 -  parallel port IDE driver, otherwise you should answer M to build
  4.1687 -  it as a loadable module. The module will be called pd.o. You
  4.1688 -  must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in your
  4.1689 -  system. Among the devices supported by this driver are the SyQuest
  4.1690 -  EZ-135, EZ-230 and SparQ drives, the Avatar Shark and the backpack
  4.1691 -  hard drives from MicroSolutions.
  4.1692 -
  4.1693 -Parallel port ATAPI CD-ROMs
  4.1694 -CONFIG_PARIDE_PCD
  4.1695 -  This option enables the high-level driver for ATAPI CD-ROM devices
  4.1696 -  connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
  4.1697 -  support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
  4.1698 -  parallel port ATAPI CD-ROM driver, otherwise you should answer M to
  4.1699 -  build it as a loadable module. The module will be called pcd.o. You
  4.1700 -  must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in your
  4.1701 -  system. Among the devices supported by this driver are the
  4.1702 -  MicroSolutions backpack CD-ROM drives and the Freecom Power CD. If
  4.1703 -  you have such a CD-ROM drive, you should also say Y or M to "ISO
  4.1704 -  9660 CD-ROM file system support" below, because that's the file
  4.1705 -  system used on CD-ROMs.
  4.1706 -
  4.1707 -Parallel port ATAPI disks
  4.1708 -CONFIG_PARIDE_PF
  4.1709 -  This option enables the high-level driver for ATAPI disk devices
  4.1710 -  connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
  4.1711 -  support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
  4.1712 -  parallel port ATAPI disk driver, otherwise you should answer M
  4.1713 -  to build it as a loadable module. The module will be called pf.o.
  4.1714 -  You must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in
  4.1715 -  your system. Among the devices supported by this driver are the
  4.1716 -  MicroSolutions backpack PD/CD drive and the Imation Superdisk
  4.1717 -  LS-120 drive.
  4.1718 -
  4.1719 -Parallel port ATAPI tapes
  4.1720 -CONFIG_PARIDE_PT
  4.1721 -  This option enables the high-level driver for ATAPI tape devices
  4.1722 -  connected through a parallel port. If you chose to build PARIDE
  4.1723 -  support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
  4.1724 -  parallel port ATAPI disk driver, otherwise you should answer M
  4.1725 -  to build it as a loadable module. The module will be called pt.o.
  4.1726 -  You must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in
  4.1727 -  your system. Among the devices supported by this driver is the
  4.1728 -  parallel port version of the HP 5GB drive.
  4.1729 -
  4.1730 -Parallel port generic ATAPI devices
  4.1731 -CONFIG_PARIDE_PG
  4.1732 -  This option enables a special high-level driver for generic ATAPI
  4.1733 -  devices connected through a parallel port. The driver allows user
  4.1734 -  programs, such as cdrtools, to send ATAPI commands directly to a
  4.1735 -  device.
  4.1736 -
  4.1737 -  If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may
  4.1738 -  answer Y here to build in the parallel port generic ATAPI driver,
  4.1739 -  otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The
  4.1740 -  module will be called pg.o.
  4.1741 -
  4.1742 -  You must also have at least one parallel port protocol driver in
  4.1743 -  your system.
  4.1744 -
  4.1745 -  This driver implements an API loosely related to the generic SCSI
  4.1746 -  driver. See <file:include/linux/pg.h>. for details.
  4.1747 -
  4.1748 -  You can obtain the most recent version of cdrtools from
  4.1749 -  <ftp://ftp.fokus.gmd.de/pub/unix/cdrecord/>. Versions 1.6.1a3 and
  4.1750 -  later fully support this driver.
  4.1751 -
  4.1752 -ATEN EH-100 protocol
  4.1753 -CONFIG_PARIDE_ATEN
  4.1754 -  This option enables support for the ATEN EH-100 parallel port IDE
  4.1755 -  protocol. This protocol is used in some inexpensive low performance
  4.1756 -  parallel port kits made in Hong Kong. If you chose to build PARIDE
  4.1757 -  support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
  4.1758 -  protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a
  4.1759 -  loadable module. The module will be called aten.o. You must also
  4.1760 -  have a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to
  4.1761 -  support.
  4.1762 -
  4.1763 -Micro Solutions BACKPACK Series 5 protocol
  4.1764 -CONFIG_PARIDE_BPCK
  4.1765 -  This option enables support for the Micro Solutions BACKPACK
  4.1766 -  parallel port Series 5 IDE protocol.  (Most BACKPACK drives made
  4.1767 -  before 1999 were Series 5) Series 5 drives will NOT always have the
  4.1768 -  Series noted on the bottom of the drive. Series 6 drivers will.
  4.1769 -
  4.1770 -  In other words, if your BACKPACK drive dosen't say "Series 6" on the
  4.1771 -  bottom, enable this option.
  4.1772 -
  4.1773 -  If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may
  4.1774 -  answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you should
  4.1775 -  answer M to build it as a loadable module.  The module will be
  4.1776 -  called bpck.o.  You must also have a high-level driver for the type
  4.1777 -  of device that you want to support.
  4.1778 -
  4.1779 -Micro Solutions BACKPACK Series 6 protocol
  4.1780 -CONFIG_PARIDE_BPCK6
  4.1781 -  This option enables support for the Micro Solutions BACKPACK
  4.1782 -  parallel port Series 6 IDE protocol.  (Most BACKPACK drives made
  4.1783 -  after 1999 were Series 6) Series 6 drives will have the Series noted
  4.1784 -  on the bottom of the drive.  Series 5 drivers don't always have it
  4.1785 -  noted.
  4.1786 -
  4.1787 -  In other words, if your BACKPACK drive says "Series 6" on the
  4.1788 -  bottom, enable this option.
  4.1789 -
  4.1790 -  If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may
  4.1791 -  answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you should
  4.1792 -  answer M to build it as a loadable module.  The module will be
  4.1793 -  called bpck6.o.  You must also have a high-level driver for the type
  4.1794 -  of device that you want to support.
  4.1795 -
  4.1796 -DataStor Commuter protocol
  4.1797 -CONFIG_PARIDE_COMM
  4.1798 -  This option enables support for the Commuter parallel port IDE
  4.1799 -  protocol from DataStor. If you chose to build PARIDE support
  4.1800 -  into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol
  4.1801 -  driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable
  4.1802 -  module. The module will be called comm.o. You must also have
  4.1803 -  a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to support.
  4.1804 -
  4.1805 -DataStor EP-2000 protocol
  4.1806 -CONFIG_PARIDE_DSTR
  4.1807 -  This option enables support for the EP-2000 parallel port IDE
  4.1808 -  protocol from DataStor. If you chose to build PARIDE support
  4.1809 -  into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol
  4.1810 -  driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable
  4.1811 -  module. The module will be called dstr.o. You must also have
  4.1812 -  a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to support.
  4.1813 -
  4.1814 -Shuttle EPAT/EPEZ protocol
  4.1815 -CONFIG_PARIDE_EPAT
  4.1816 -  This option enables support for the EPAT parallel port IDE protocol.
  4.1817 -  EPAT is a parallel port IDE adapter manufactured by Shuttle
  4.1818 -  Technology and widely used in devices from major vendors such as
  4.1819 -  Hewlett-Packard, SyQuest, Imation and Avatar. If you chose to build
  4.1820 -  PARIDE support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in
  4.1821 -  the protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a
  4.1822 -  loadable module. The module will be called epat.o. You must also
  4.1823 -  have a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to
  4.1824 -  support.
  4.1825 -
  4.1826 -Shuttle EPAT c7/c8 extension
  4.1827 -CONFIG_PARIDE_EPATC8
  4.1828 -  This option enables support for the newer Shuttle EP1284 (aka c7 and
  4.1829 -  c8) chip. You need this if you are using any recent Imation SuperDisk
  4.1830 -  (LS-120) drive.
  4.1831 -
  4.1832 -Shuttle EPIA protocol
  4.1833 -CONFIG_PARIDE_EPIA
  4.1834 -  This option enables support for the (obsolete) EPIA parallel port
  4.1835 -  IDE protocol from Shuttle Technology. This adapter can still be
  4.1836 -  found in some no-name kits. If you chose to build PARIDE support
  4.1837 -  into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol
  4.1838 -  driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable
  4.1839 -  module. The module will be called epia.o. You must also have a
  4.1840 -  high-level driver for the type of device that you want to support.
  4.1841 -
  4.1842 -FIT TD-2000 protocol
  4.1843 -CONFIG_PARIDE_FIT2
  4.1844 -  This option enables support for the TD-2000 parallel port IDE
  4.1845 -  protocol from Fidelity International Technology. This is a simple
  4.1846 -  (low speed) adapter that is used in some portable hard drives. If
  4.1847 -  you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you may answer Y
  4.1848 -  here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M
  4.1849 -  to build it as a loadable module. The module will be called fit2.o.
  4.1850 -  You must also have a high-level driver for the type of device that
  4.1851 -  you want to support.
  4.1852 -
  4.1853 -FIT TD-3000 protocol
  4.1854 -CONFIG_PARIDE_FIT3
  4.1855 -  This option enables support for the TD-3000 parallel port IDE
  4.1856 -  protocol from Fidelity International Technology. This protocol is
  4.1857 -  used in newer models of their portable disk, CD-ROM and PD/CD
  4.1858 -  devices. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
  4.1859 -  may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
  4.1860 -  should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
  4.1861 -  called fit3.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
  4.1862 -  of device that you want to support.
  4.1863 -
  4.1864 -Freecom IQ ASIC-2 protocol
  4.1865 -CONFIG_PARIDE_FRIQ
  4.1866 -  This option enables support for version 2 of the Freecom IQ parallel
  4.1867 -  port IDE adapter.  This adapter is used by the Maxell Superdisk
  4.1868 -  drive.  If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
  4.1869 -  may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
  4.1870 -  should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
  4.1871 -  called friq.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
  4.1872 -  of device that you want to support.
  4.1873 -
  4.1874 -FreeCom power protocol
  4.1875 -CONFIG_PARIDE_FRPW
  4.1876 -  This option enables support for the Freecom power parallel port IDE
  4.1877 -  protocol. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
  4.1878 -  may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
  4.1879 -  should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
  4.1880 -  called frpw.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
  4.1881 -  of device that you want to support.
  4.1882 -
  4.1883 -KingByte KBIC-951A/971A protocols
  4.1884 -CONFIG_PARIDE_KBIC
  4.1885 -  This option enables support for the KBIC-951A and KBIC-971A parallel
  4.1886 -  port IDE protocols from KingByte Information Corp. KingByte's
  4.1887 -  adapters appear in many no-name portable disk and CD-ROM products,
  4.1888 -  especially in Europe. If you chose to build PARIDE support into your
  4.1889 -  kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver,
  4.1890 -  otherwise you should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The
  4.1891 -  module will be called kbic.o. You must also have a high-level driver
  4.1892 -  for the type of device that you want to support.
  4.1893 -
  4.1894 -KT PHd protocol
  4.1895 -CONFIG_PARIDE_KTTI
  4.1896 -  This option enables support for the "PHd" parallel port IDE protocol
  4.1897 -  from KT Technology. This is a simple (low speed) adapter that is
  4.1898 -  used in some 2.5" portable hard drives. If you chose to build PARIDE
  4.1899 -  support into your kernel, you may answer Y here to build in the
  4.1900 -  protocol driver, otherwise you should answer M to build it as a
  4.1901 -  loadable module. The module will be called ktti.o. You must also
  4.1902 -  have a high-level driver for the type of device that you want to
  4.1903 -  support.
  4.1904 -
  4.1905 -OnSpec 90c20 protocol
  4.1906 -CONFIG_PARIDE_ON20
  4.1907 -  This option enables support for the (obsolete) 90c20 parallel port
  4.1908 -  IDE protocol from OnSpec (often marketed under the ValuStore brand
  4.1909 -  name). If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
  4.1910 -  may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
  4.1911 -  should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will
  4.1912 -  be called on20.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the
  4.1913 -  type of device that you want to support.
  4.1914 -
  4.1915 -OnSpec 90c26 protocol
  4.1916 -CONFIG_PARIDE_ON26
  4.1917 -  This option enables support for the 90c26 parallel port IDE protocol
  4.1918 -  from OnSpec Electronics (often marketed under the ValuStore brand
  4.1919 -  name). If you chose to build PARIDE support into your kernel, you
  4.1920 -  may answer Y here to build in the protocol driver, otherwise you
  4.1921 -  should answer M to build it as a loadable module. The module will be
  4.1922 -  called on26.o. You must also have a high-level driver for the type
  4.1923 -  of device that you want to support.
  4.1924 -
  4.1925 -Logical Volume Manager (LVM) support
  4.1926 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_LVM
  4.1927 -  This driver lets you combine several hard disks, hard disk
  4.1928 -  partitions, multiple devices or even loop devices (for evaluation
  4.1929 -  purposes) into a volume group.  Imagine a volume group as a kind of
  4.1930 -  virtual disk. Logical volumes, which can be thought of as virtual
  4.1931 -  partitions, can be created in the volume group.  You can resize
  4.1932 -  volume groups and logical volumes after creation time, corresponding
  4.1933 -  to new capacity needs.  Logical volumes are accessed as block
  4.1934 -  devices named /dev/VolumeGroupName/LogicalVolumeName.
  4.1935 -
  4.1936 -  For details see <file:Documentation/LVM-HOWTO>.  You will need
  4.1937 -  supporting user space software; location is in
  4.1938 -  <file:Documentation/Changes>.
  4.1939 -
  4.1940 -  If you want to compile this support as a module ( = code which can
  4.1941 -  be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
  4.1942 -  want), say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The
  4.1943 -  module will be called lvm-mod.o.
  4.1944 -
  4.1945 -Multiple devices driver support (RAID and LVM)
  4.1946 -CONFIG_MD
  4.1947 -  Support multiple physical spindles through a single logical device.
  4.1948 -  Required for RAID and logical volume management (LVM).
  4.1949 -
  4.1950 -Multiple devices driver support
  4.1951 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_MD
  4.1952 -  This driver lets you combine several hard disk partitions into one
  4.1953 -  logical block device. This can be used to simply append one
  4.1954 -  partition to another one or to combine several redundant hard disks
  4.1955 -  into a RAID1/4/5 device so as to provide protection against hard
  4.1956 -  disk failures. This is called "Software RAID" since the combining of
  4.1957 -  the partitions is done by the kernel. "Hardware RAID" means that the
  4.1958 -  combining is done by a dedicated controller; if you have such a
  4.1959 -  controller, you do not need to say Y here.
  4.1960 -
  4.1961 -  More information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
  4.1962 -  Software RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
  4.1963 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also learn
  4.1964 -  where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
  4.1965 -
  4.1966 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.1967 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.1968 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.1969 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.1970 -  md.o
  4.1971 -
  4.1972 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.1973 -
  4.1974 -Linear (append) mode
  4.1975 -CONFIG_MD_LINEAR
  4.1976 -  If you say Y here, then your multiple devices driver will be able to
  4.1977 -  use the so-called linear mode, i.e. it will combine the hard disk
  4.1978 -  partitions by simply appending one to the other.
  4.1979 -
  4.1980 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
  4.1981 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.1982 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.1983 -  will be called linear.o.
  4.1984 -
  4.1985 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.1986 -
  4.1987 -RAID-0 (striping) mode
  4.1988 -CONFIG_MD_RAID0
  4.1989 -  If you say Y here, then your multiple devices driver will be able to
  4.1990 -  use the so-called raid0 mode, i.e. it will combine the hard disk
  4.1991 -  partitions into one logical device in such a fashion as to fill them
  4.1992 -  up evenly, one chunk here and one chunk there. This will increase
  4.1993 -  the throughput rate if the partitions reside on distinct disks.
  4.1994 -
  4.1995 -  Information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
  4.1996 -  Software-RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
  4.1997 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also
  4.1998 -  learn where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
  4.1999 -
  4.2000 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
  4.2001 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.2002 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.2003 -  will be called raid0.o.
  4.2004 -
  4.2005 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.2006 -
  4.2007 -RAID-1 (mirroring) mode
  4.2008 -CONFIG_MD_RAID1
  4.2009 -  A RAID-1 set consists of several disk drives which are exact copies
  4.2010 -  of each other.  In the event of a mirror failure, the RAID driver
  4.2011 -  will continue to use the operational mirrors in the set, providing
  4.2012 -  an error free MD (multiple device) to the higher levels of the
  4.2013 -  kernel.  In a set with N drives, the available space is the capacity
  4.2014 -  of a single drive, and the set protects against a failure of (N - 1)
  4.2015 -  drives.
  4.2016 -
  4.2017 -  Information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
  4.2018 -  Software-RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
  4.2019 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.  There you will also
  4.2020 -  learn where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
  4.2021 -
  4.2022 -  If you want to use such a RAID-1 set, say Y. This code is also
  4.2023 -  available as a module called raid1.o ( = code which can be inserted
  4.2024 -  in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).  If you
  4.2025 -  want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2026 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2027 -
  4.2028 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.2029 -
  4.2030 -RAID-4/RAID-5 mode
  4.2031 -CONFIG_MD_RAID5
  4.2032 -  A RAID-5 set of N drives with a capacity of C MB per drive provides
  4.2033 -  the capacity of C * (N - 1) MB, and protects against a failure
  4.2034 -  of a single drive. For a given sector (row) number, (N - 1) drives
  4.2035 -  contain data sectors, and one drive contains the parity protection.
  4.2036 -  For a RAID-4 set, the parity blocks are present on a single drive,
  4.2037 -  while a RAID-5 set distributes the parity across the drives in one
  4.2038 -  of the available parity distribution methods.
  4.2039 -
  4.2040 -  Information about Software RAID on Linux is contained in the
  4.2041 -  Software-RAID mini-HOWTO, available from
  4.2042 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. There you will also
  4.2043 -  learn where to get the supporting user space utilities raidtools.
  4.2044 -
  4.2045 -  If you want to use such a RAID-4/RAID-5 set, say Y. This code is
  4.2046 -  also available as a module called raid5.o ( = code which can be
  4.2047 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.2048 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2049 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2050 -
  4.2051 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.2052 -
  4.2053 -Multipath I/O support
  4.2054 -CONFIG_MD_MULTIPATH
  4.2055 -  Multipath-IO is the ability of certain devices to address the same
  4.2056 -  physical disk over multiple 'IO paths'. The code ensures that such
  4.2057 -  paths can be defined and handled at runtime, and ensures that a
  4.2058 -  transparent failover to the backup path(s) happens if a IO errors
  4.2059 -  arrives on the primary path.
  4.2060 -
  4.2061 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.2062 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.2063 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2064 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.2065 -  multipath.o
  4.2066 -
  4.2067 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.2068 -
  4.2069 -Support for IDE Raid controllers
  4.2070 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID
  4.2071 -  Say Y or M if you have an IDE Raid controller and want linux
  4.2072 -  to use its softwareraid feature.  You must also select an
  4.2073 -  appropriate for your board low-level driver below.
  4.2074 -
  4.2075 -  Note, that Linux does not use the Raid implementation in BIOS, and
  4.2076 -  the main purpose for this feature is to retain compatibility and
  4.2077 -  data integrity with other OS-es, using the same disk array. Linux
  4.2078 -  has its own Raid drivers, which you should use if you need better
  4.2079 -  performance.
  4.2080 -
  4.2081 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.2082 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.2083 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2084 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.2085 -  ataraid.o
  4.2086 -
  4.2087 -Support Promise software RAID (Fasttrak(tm))
  4.2088 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_PDC
  4.2089 -  Say Y or M if you have a Promise Fasttrak (tm) Raid controller
  4.2090 -  and want linux to use the softwareraid feature of this card.
  4.2091 -  This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y numbers) as device
  4.2092 -  names.
  4.2093 -
  4.2094 -  If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
  4.2095 -  pdcraid.o.
  4.2096 -
  4.2097 -Highpoint 370 software RAID
  4.2098 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_HPT
  4.2099 -  Say Y or M if you have a Highpoint HPT 370 Raid controller
  4.2100 -  and want linux to use the softwareraid feature of this card.
  4.2101 -  This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y numbers) as device
  4.2102 -  names.
  4.2103 -
  4.2104 -  If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
  4.2105 -  hptraid.o.
  4.2106 -
  4.2107 -CMD/Silicon Image Medley Software RAID
  4.2108 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_MEDLEY
  4.2109 -  Say Y or M if you have a Silicon Image 3112 SATA RAID controller,
  4.2110 -  a CMD680 based controller, or another IDE RAID controller that uses
  4.2111 -  CMD's Medley software RAID, and want Linux to use the software RAID
  4.2112 -  feature of this card.  This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y
  4.2113 -  numbers) as device names.
  4.2114 -
  4.2115 -  This driver currently only supports RAID0 (striped) mode, so if you
  4.2116 -  are using RAID1 (mirroring) this will not work for you. In that
  4.2117 -  case, you may want to try the Silicon Image Medley Software RAID
  4.2118 -  driver (below).
  4.2119 -
  4.2120 -  Support for mirroring is planned in the future.
  4.2121 -
  4.2122 -  If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
  4.2123 -  medley.o.
  4.2124 -
  4.2125 -Silicon Image Medley Software RAID (old driver)
  4.2126 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_ATARAID_SII
  4.2127 -  Say Y or M if you have a Silicon Image SATARaid controller
  4.2128 -  and want Linux to use the softwareraid feature of this card.
  4.2129 -  This driver uses /dev/ataraid/dXpY (X and Y numbers) as device
  4.2130 -  names.
  4.2131 -
  4.2132 -  This driver does not reliably detect all Medley RAID sets, and could
  4.2133 -  be dangerous if you have a striped set with disks of different size.
  4.2134 -
  4.2135 -  You should use the new Medley RAID driver (above), unless you use
  4.2136 -  RAID1 (mirroring), which the new driver does not yet support.
  4.2137 -
  4.2138 -  If you choose to compile this as a module, the module will be called
  4.2139 -  silraid.o.
  4.2140 -
  4.2141 -Support for Acer PICA 1 chipset
  4.2142 -CONFIG_ACER_PICA_61
  4.2143 -  This is a machine with a R4400 133/150 MHz CPU. To compile a Linux
  4.2144 -  kernel that runs on these, say Y here. For details about Linux on
  4.2145 -  the MIPS architecture, check out the Linux/MIPS FAQ on the WWW at
  4.2146 -  <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
  4.2147 -
  4.2148 -Support for Algorithmics P4032 (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.2149 -CONFIG_ALGOR_P4032
  4.2150 -  This is an evaluation board of the British company Algorithmics.
  4.2151 -  The board uses the R4300 and a R5230 CPUs.  For more information
  4.2152 -  about this board see <http://www.algor.co.uk/>.
  4.2153 -
  4.2154 -SGI SN2 L1 serial port support
  4.2155 -CONFIG_SGI_L1_SERIAL
  4.2156 -  If you have an SGI SN2 and you want to use the serial port connected
  4.2157 -  to the system controller (you want this!), say Y.  Otherwise, say N.
  4.2158 -
  4.2159 -SGI SN2 L1 serial console support
  4.2160 -CONFIG_SGI_L1_SERIAL_CONSOLE
  4.2161 -  If you have an SGI SN2 and you would like to use the system
  4.2162 -  controller serial port as your console (you want this!), say Y.
  4.2163 -  Otherwise, say N.
  4.2164 -
  4.2165 -Support for BAGET MIPS series
  4.2166 -CONFIG_BAGET_MIPS
  4.2167 -  This enables support for the Baget, a Russian embedded system.  For
  4.2168 -  more details about the Baget see the Linux/MIPS FAQ on
  4.2169 -  <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
  4.2170 -
  4.2171 -Baget AMD LANCE support
  4.2172 -CONFIG_BAGETLANCE
  4.2173 -  Say Y to enable kernel support for AMD Lance Ethernet cards on the
  4.2174 -  MIPS-32-based Baget embedded system.  This chipset is better known
  4.2175 -  via the NE2100 cards.
  4.2176 -
  4.2177 -Support for DECstations
  4.2178 -CONFIG_DECSTATION
  4.2179 -  This enables support for DEC's MIPS based workstations.  For details
  4.2180 -  see the Linux/MIPS FAQ on <http://www.linux-mips.org/> and the
  4.2181 -  DECstation porting pages on <http://decstation.unix-ag.org/>.
  4.2182 -
  4.2183 -  If you have one of the following DECstation Models you definitely
  4.2184 -  want to choose R4xx0 for the CPU Type:
  4.2185 -
  4.2186 -	DECstation 5000/50
  4.2187 -	DECstation 5000/150
  4.2188 -	DECstation 5000/260
  4.2189 -	DECsystem 5900/260
  4.2190 -
  4.2191 -  otherwise choose R3000.
  4.2192 -
  4.2193 -Support for Cobalt Micro Server
  4.2194 -CONFIG_COBALT_MICRO_SERVER
  4.2195 -  Support for MIPS-based Cobalt boxes (they have been bought by Sun
  4.2196 -  and are now the "Server Appliance Business Unit") including the 2700
  4.2197 -  series -- versions 1 of the Qube and Raq.  To compile a Linux kernel
  4.2198 -  for this hardware, say Y here.
  4.2199 -
  4.2200 -Support for Cobalt 2800
  4.2201 -CONFIG_COBALT_28
  4.2202 -  Support for the second generation of MIPS-based Cobalt boxes (they
  4.2203 -  have been bought by Sun and are now the "Server Appliance Business
  4.2204 -  Unit") including the 2800 series -- versions 2 of the Qube and Raq.
  4.2205 -  To compile a Linux kernel for this hardware, say Y here.
  4.2206 -
  4.2207 -Support for the Momentum Computer Ocelot SBC
  4.2208 -CONFIG_MOMENCO_OCELOT
  4.2209 -  The Ocelot is a MIPS-based Single Board Computer (SBC) made by
  4.2210 -  Momentum Computer <http://www.momenco.com/>.
  4.2211 -
  4.2212 -Support for NEC DDB Vrc-5074
  4.2213 -CONFIG_DDB5074
  4.2214 -  This enables support for the VR5000-based NEC DDB Vrc-5074
  4.2215 -  evaluation board.
  4.2216 -
  4.2217 -Support for NEC DDB Vrc-5476
  4.2218 -CONFIG_DDB5476
  4.2219 -  This enables support for the R5432-based NEC DDB Vrc-5476
  4.2220 -  evaluation board.
  4.2221 -
  4.2222 -  Features : kernel debugging, serial terminal, NFS root fs, on-board
  4.2223 -  ether port (Need an additional patch at <http://linux.junsun.net/>),
  4.2224 -  USB, AC97, PCI, PCI VGA card & framebuffer console, IDE controller,
  4.2225 -  PS2 keyboard, PS2 mouse, etc.
  4.2226 -
  4.2227 -Support for NEC DDB Vrc-5477
  4.2228 -CONFIG_DDB5477
  4.2229 -  This enables support for the R5432-based NEC DDB Vrc-5477
  4.2230 -  evaluation board.
  4.2231 -
  4.2232 -  Features : kernel debugging, serial terminal, NFS root fs, on-board
  4.2233 -  ether port (Need an additional patch at <http://linux.junsun.net/>),
  4.2234 -  USB, AC97, PCI, etc.
  4.2235 -
  4.2236 -Support for MIPS Atlas board
  4.2237 -CONFIG_MIPS_ATLAS
  4.2238 -  This enables support for the QED R5231-based MIPS Atlas evaluation
  4.2239 -  board.
  4.2240 -
  4.2241 -Support for MIPS Malta board
  4.2242 -CONFIG_MIPS_MALTA
  4.2243 -  This enables support for the VR5000-based MIPS Malta evaluation
  4.2244 -  board.
  4.2245 -
  4.2246 -# Choice: bcmboard
  4.2247 -Support for Broadcom SiByte boards
  4.2248 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_SWARM
  4.2249 -  Enable support for boards based on the Broadcom SiByte family:
  4.2250 -
  4.2251 -  BCM91250A-SWARM    BCM1250 ATX size Eval Board (BCM91250A-SWARM)
  4.2252 -
  4.2253 -  BCM91250E-Sentosa  BCM1250 PCI card Eval Board (BCM91250E-Sentosa)
  4.2254 -
  4.2255 -  BCM91125E-Rhone    BCM1125 PCI card Eval Board (BCM91125E-Rhone)
  4.2256 -
  4.2257 -  Other              Non-Broadcom SiByte-based platform
  4.2258 -
  4.2259 -# Choice: bcmsoc
  4.2260 -Support for Broadcom BCM1xxx SOCs
  4.2261 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_SB1250
  4.2262 -
  4.2263 -  BCM1250     Dual-CPU SB1 with PCI and HyperTransport.
  4.2264 -
  4.2265 -  BCM1120     Uniprocessor SB1.
  4.2266 -
  4.2267 -  BCM1125     Uniprocessor SB1 with PCI (and HyperTransport for 1125H).
  4.2268 -
  4.2269 -BCM1250 Stepping
  4.2270 -CONFIG_CPU_SB1_PASS_1
  4.2271 -  Which pass of the SOC is supported (see the "system_revision"
  4.2272 -  register in the User Manual for more discussion of revisions):
  4.2273 -
  4.2274 -  Pass1    1250 "Pass 1"
  4.2275 -
  4.2276 -  An       1250 "Pass 2"
  4.2277 -
  4.2278 -  Bn       1250 "Pass 2.2"
  4.2279 -
  4.2280 -  Cn       1250 "Pass 3"
  4.2281 -
  4.2282 -BCM112x Stepping
  4.2283 -CONFIG_CPU_SB1_PASS_2
  4.2284 -  Which pass of the SOC is supported (see the "system_revision"
  4.2285 -  register in the User Manual for more discussion of revisions):
  4.2286 -
  4.2287 -  Hybrid   1250 "Pass 2"
  4.2288 -
  4.2289 -  An       112x "Pass 1"
  4.2290 -
  4.2291 -Booting from CFE
  4.2292 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_CFE
  4.2293 -  Make use of the CFE API for enumerating available memory,
  4.2294 -  controlling secondary CPUs, and possibly console output.
  4.2295 -
  4.2296 -Use firmware console
  4.2297 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_CFE_CONSOLE
  4.2298 -  Use the CFE API's console write routines during boot.  Other console
  4.2299 -  options (VT console, sb1250 duart console, etc.) should not be
  4.2300 -  configured.
  4.2301 -
  4.2302 -Support for Bus Watcher statistics
  4.2303 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_BUS_WATCHER
  4.2304 -  Handle and keep statistics on the bus error interrupts (COR_ECC,
  4.2305 -  BAD_ECC, IO_BUS).
  4.2306 -
  4.2307 -Bus trace dump on bus error
  4.2308 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_BW_TRACE
  4.2309 -  Run a continuous bus trace, dumping the raw data as soon as a ZBbus
  4.2310 -  error is detected.  Cannot work if ZBbus profiling is turned on, and
  4.2311 -  also will interfere with JTAG-based trace buffer activity.  Raw
  4.2312 -  buffer data is dumped to console, and must be processed off-line.
  4.2313 -
  4.2314 -Corelis Debugger
  4.2315 -CONFIG_SB1XXX_CORELIS
  4.2316 -  Select compile flags that produce code that can be processed by the
  4.2317 -  Corelis mksym utility and UDB Emulator.
  4.2318 -
  4.2319 -DMA for page clear and copy
  4.2320 -CONFIG_SIBYTE_DMA_PAGEOPS
  4.2321 -  Instead of using the CPU to zero and copy pages, use a Data Mover
  4.2322 -  channel.  These DMA channels are otherwise unused by the standard
  4.2323 -  SiByte Linux port.  Seems to give a small performance benefit.
  4.2324 -
  4.2325 -Support for Galileo Evaluation board or CoSine Orion
  4.2326 -CONFIG_ORION
  4.2327 -  Say Y if configuring for the Galileo evaluation board
  4.2328 -  or CoSine Orion.  More information is available at
  4.2329 -  <http://tochna.technion.ac.il/project/linux/html/linux.html>.
  4.2330 -
  4.2331 -  Otherwise, say N.
  4.2332 -
  4.2333 -Support for Mips Magnum 4000
  4.2334 -CONFIG_MIPS_MAGNUM_4000
  4.2335 -  This is a machine with a R4000 100 MHz CPU. To compile a Linux
  4.2336 -  kernel that runs on these, say Y here. For details about Linux on
  4.2337 -  the MIPS architecture, check out the Linux/MIPS FAQ on the WWW at
  4.2338 -  <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
  4.2339 -
  4.2340 -Enable Qtronix 990P Keyboard Support
  4.2341 -CONFIG_QTRONIX_KEYBOARD
  4.2342 -  Images of Qtronix keyboards are at
  4.2343 -  <http://www.qtronix.com/keyboard.html>.
  4.2344 -
  4.2345 -Support for Olivetti M700
  4.2346 -CONFIG_OLIVETTI_M700
  4.2347 -  This is a machine with a R4000 100 MHz CPU. To compile a Linux
  4.2348 -  kernel that runs on these, say Y here. For details about Linux on
  4.2349 -  the MIPS architecture, check out the Linux/MIPS FAQ on the WWW at
  4.2350 -  <http://www.linux-mips.org/>.
  4.2351 -
  4.2352 -Support for SNI RM200 PCI
  4.2353 -CONFIG_SNI_RM200_PCI
  4.2354 -  The SNI RM200 PCI was a MIPS-based platform manufactured by Siemens
  4.2355 -  Nixdorf Informationssysteme (SNI), parent company of Pyramid
  4.2356 -  Technology and now in turn merged with Fujitsu.  Say Y here to
  4.2357 -  support this machine type.
  4.2358 -
  4.2359 -Support for SGI-IP22 (Indy/Indigo2)
  4.2360 -CONFIG_SGI_IP22
  4.2361 -  This are the SGI Indy, Challenge S and Indigo2, as well as certain
  4.2362 -  OEM variants like the Tandem CMN B006S. To compile a Linux kernel
  4.2363 -  that runs on these, say Y here.
  4.2364 -
  4.2365 -Support for SGI IP27 (Origin200/2000)
  4.2366 -CONFIG_SGI_IP27
  4.2367 -  This are the SGI Origin 200, Origin 2000 and Onyx 2 Graphics
  4.2368 -  workstations.  To compile a Linux kernel that runs on these, say Y
  4.2369 -  here.
  4.2370 -
  4.2371 -IP27 N-Mode
  4.2372 -CONFIG_SGI_SN0_N_MODE
  4.2373 -  The nodes of Origin 200, Origin 2000 and Onyx 2 systems can be
  4.2374 -  configured in either N-Modes which allows for more nodes or M-Mode
  4.2375 -  which allows for more memory.  Your system is most probably
  4.2376 -  running in M-Mode, so you should say N here.
  4.2377 -
  4.2378 -Lasi Ethernet
  4.2379 -CONFIG_LASI_82596
  4.2380 -  Say Y here to support the on-board Intel 82596 ethernet controller
  4.2381 -  built into Hewlett-Packard PA-RISC machines.
  4.2382 -
  4.2383 -MIPS JAZZ onboard SONIC Ethernet support
  4.2384 -CONFIG_MIPS_JAZZ_SONIC
  4.2385 -  This is the driver for the onboard card of MIPS Magnum 4000,
  4.2386 -  Acer PICA, Olivetti M700-10 and a few other identical OEM systems.
  4.2387 -
  4.2388 -MIPS JAZZ FAS216 SCSI support
  4.2389 -CONFIG_JAZZ_ESP
  4.2390 -  This is the driver for the onboard SCSI host adapter of MIPS Magnum
  4.2391 -  4000, Acer PICA, Olivetti M700-10 and a few other identical OEM
  4.2392 -  systems.
  4.2393 -
  4.2394 -MIPS GT96100 Ethernet support
  4.2395 -CONFIG_MIPS_GT96100ETH
  4.2396 -  Say Y here to support the Ethernet subsystem on your GT96100 card.
  4.2397 -
  4.2398 -Zalon SCSI support
  4.2399 -CONFIG_SCSI_ZALON
  4.2400 -  The Zalon is an interface chip that sits between the PA-RISC
  4.2401 -  processor and the NCR 53c720 SCSI controller on K-series PA-RISC
  4.2402 -  boards (these are used, among other places, on some HP 780
  4.2403 -  workstations).  Say Y here to make sure it gets initialized
  4.2404 -  correctly before the Linux kernel tries to talk to the controller.
  4.2405 -
  4.2406 -SGI PROM Console Support
  4.2407 -CONFIG_SGI_PROM_CONSOLE
  4.2408 -  Say Y here to set up the boot console on serial port 0.
  4.2409 -
  4.2410 -DECstation serial support
  4.2411 -CONFIG_SERIAL_DEC
  4.2412 -  This selects whether you want to be asked about drivers for
  4.2413 -  DECstation serial ports.
  4.2414 -
  4.2415 -  Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
  4.2416 -  kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
  4.2417 -  the questions about DECstation serial ports.
  4.2418 -
  4.2419 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.2420 -
  4.2421 -Support for console on a DECstation serial port
  4.2422 -CONFIG_SERIAL_DEC_CONSOLE
  4.2423 -  If you say Y here, it will be possible to use a serial port as the
  4.2424 -  system console (the system console is the device which receives all
  4.2425 -  kernel messages and warnings and which allows logins in single user
  4.2426 -  mode).  Note that the firmware uses ttyS0 as the serial console on
  4.2427 -  the Maxine and ttyS2 on the others.
  4.2428 -
  4.2429 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.2430 -
  4.2431 -DZ11 Serial Support
  4.2432 -CONFIG_DZ
  4.2433 -  DZ11-family serial controllers for VAXstations, including the
  4.2434 -  DC7085, M7814, and M7819.
  4.2435 -
  4.2436 -TURBOchannel support
  4.2437 -CONFIG_TC
  4.2438 -  TurboChannel is a DEC (now Compaq) bus for Alpha and MIPS processors.
  4.2439 -  Documentation on writing device drivers for TurboChannel is available at:
  4.2440 -  <http://www.cs.arizona.edu/computer.help/policy/DIGITAL_unix/AA-PS3HD-TET1_html/TITLE.html>.
  4.2441 -
  4.2442 -# Choice: galileo_clock
  4.2443 -75
  4.2444 -CONFIG_SYSCLK_75
  4.2445 -  Configure the kernel for clock speed of your Galileo board.  
  4.2446 -  The choices are 75MHz, 83.3MHz, and 100MHz.
  4.2447 -
  4.2448 -83.3
  4.2449 -CONFIG_SYSCLK_83
  4.2450 -  Configure the Galileo kernel for a clock speed of 83.3 MHz.
  4.2451 -
  4.2452 -100
  4.2453 -CONFIG_SYSCLK_100
  4.2454 -  Configure the Galileo kernel for a clock speed of 100 MHz.
  4.2455 -
  4.2456 -Z85C30 Serial Support
  4.2457 -CONFIG_ZS
  4.2458 -  Documentation on the Zilog 85C350 serial communications controller
  4.2459 -  is downloadable at <http://www.zilog.com/pdfs/serial/z85c30.pdf>.
  4.2460 -
  4.2461 -PCMCIA SCSI adapter support
  4.2462 -CONFIG_SCSI_PCMCIA
  4.2463 -  Say Y here if you intend to attach a PCMCIA or CardBus card to your
  4.2464 -  computer which acts as a SCSI host adapter. These are credit card
  4.2465 -  size devices often used with laptops.
  4.2466 -
  4.2467 -  Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
  4.2468 -  kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
  4.2469 -  the questions PCMCIA SCSI host adapters.
  4.2470 -
  4.2471 -Adaptec APA1480 CardBus support
  4.2472 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_APA1480
  4.2473 -  Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of CardBus SCSI host
  4.2474 -  adapter to your computer.
  4.2475 -
  4.2476 -  This driver is also available as a module called apa1480_cb.o ( =
  4.2477 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.2478 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.2479 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2480 -
  4.2481 -NinjaSCSI-3 / NinjaSCSI-32Bi (16bit) PCMCIA support
  4.2482 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_NINJA_SCSI
  4.2483 -  If you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host adapter to
  4.2484 -  your computer, say Y here and read
  4.2485 -  <file:Documentation/README.nsp_cs.eng>.
  4.2486 -
  4.2487 -  This driver is also available as a module called nsp_cs.o ( =
  4.2488 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.2489 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.2490 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2491 -
  4.2492 -Adaptec AHA152X PCMCIA support
  4.2493 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_AHA152X
  4.2494 -  Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host
  4.2495 -  adapter to your computer.
  4.2496 -
  4.2497 -  This driver is also available as a module called aha152x_cs.o ( =
  4.2498 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.2499 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.2500 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2501 -
  4.2502 -Qlogic PCMCIA support
  4.2503 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_QLOGIC
  4.2504 -  Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host
  4.2505 -  adapter to your computer.
  4.2506 -
  4.2507 -  This driver is also available as a module called qlogic_cs.o ( =
  4.2508 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.2509 -  whenever you want).  If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.2510 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2511 -
  4.2512 -Future Domain PCMCIA support
  4.2513 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_FDOMAIN
  4.2514 -  Say Y here if you intend to attach this type of PCMCIA SCSI host
  4.2515 -  adapter to your computer.
  4.2516 -
  4.2517 -  This driver is also available as a module called fdomain_cs.o ( =
  4.2518 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.2519 -  whenever you want).  If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.2520 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.2521 -
  4.2522 -# Choice: mipstype
  4.2523 -CPU type
  4.2524 -CONFIG_CPU_R3000
  4.2525 -  Please make sure to pick the right CPU type. Linux/MIPS is not
  4.2526 -  designed to be generic, i.e. Kernels compiled for R3000 CPUs will
  4.2527 -  *not* work on R4000 machines and vice versa.  However, since most
  4.2528 -  of the supported machines have an R4000 (or similar) CPU, R4x00
  4.2529 -  might be a safe bet.  If the resulting kernel does not work,
  4.2530 -  try to recompile with R3000.
  4.2531 -
  4.2532 -  R3000    MIPS Technologies R3000-series processors,
  4.2533 -           including the 3041, 3051, and 3081.
  4.2534 -
  4.2535 -  R6000    MIPS Technologies R6000-series processors,
  4.2536 -           including the 64474, 64475, 64574 and 64575.
  4.2537 -
  4.2538 -  R4300    MIPS Technologies R4300-series processors.
  4.2539 -
  4.2540 -  R4x00    MIPS Technologies R4000-series processors other than 4300,
  4.2541 -           including the 4640, 4650, and 4700.
  4.2542 -
  4.2543 -  R5000    MIPS Technologies R5000-series processors other than the
  4.2544 -           Nevada.
  4.2545 -
  4.2546 -  R52xx    MIPS Technologies R52xx-series ("Nevada") processors.
  4.2547 -
  4.2548 -  R10000   MIPS Technologies R10000-series processors.
  4.2549 -
  4.2550 -  SB1      Broadcom SiByte SB1 processor.
  4.2551 -
  4.2552 -R6000
  4.2553 -CONFIG_CPU_R6000
  4.2554 -  MIPS Technologies R6000-series processors, including the 64474,
  4.2555 -  64475, 64574 and 64575.
  4.2556 -
  4.2557 -R4300
  4.2558 -CONFIG_CPU_R4300
  4.2559 -  MIPS Technologies R4300-series processors.
  4.2560 -
  4.2561 -R4x00
  4.2562 -CONFIG_CPU_R4X00
  4.2563 -  MIPS Technologies R4000-series processors other than 4300, including
  4.2564 -  the 4640, 4650, and 4700.
  4.2565 -
  4.2566 -R5000
  4.2567 -CONFIG_CPU_R5000
  4.2568 -  MIPS Technologies R5000-series processors other than the Nevada.
  4.2569 -
  4.2570 -R52x0
  4.2571 -CONFIG_CPU_NEVADA
  4.2572 -  MIPS Technologies R52x0-series ("Nevada") processors.
  4.2573 -
  4.2574 -R8000
  4.2575 -CONFIG_CPU_R8000
  4.2576 -  MIPS Technologies R8000-series processors.
  4.2577 -
  4.2578 -R10000
  4.2579 -CONFIG_CPU_R10000
  4.2580 -  MIPS Technologies R10000-series processors.
  4.2581 -
  4.2582 -SB1
  4.2583 -CONFIG_CPU_SB1
  4.2584 -  Broadcom SiByte SB1 processor.
  4.2585 -
  4.2586 -Discontiguous Memory Support
  4.2587 -CONFIG_DISCONTIGMEM
  4.2588 -  Say Y to support efficient handling of discontiguous physical memory,
  4.2589 -  for architectures which are either NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory Access)
  4.2590 -  or have huge holes in the physical address space for other reasons.
  4.2591 -  See <file:Documentation/vm/numa> for more.
  4.2592 -
  4.2593 -Mapped kernel support
  4.2594 -CONFIG_MAPPED_KERNEL
  4.2595 -  Change the way a Linux kernel is loaded unto memory on a MIPS64
  4.2596 -  machine.  This is required in order to support text replication and
  4.2597 -  NUMA.  If you need to understand it, read the source code.
  4.2598 -
  4.2599 -Kernel text replication support
  4.2600 -CONFIG_REPLICATE_KTEXT
  4.2601 -  Say Y here to enable replicating the kernel text across multiple
  4.2602 -  nodes in a NUMA cluster.  This trades memory for speed.
  4.2603 -
  4.2604 -Exception handler replication support
  4.2605 -CONFIG_REPLICATE_EXHANDLERS
  4.2606 -  Say Y here to enable replicating the kernel exception handlers
  4.2607 -  across multiple nodes in a NUMA cluster. This trades memory for
  4.2608 -  speed.
  4.2609 -
  4.2610 -NUMA support?
  4.2611 -CONFIG_NUMA
  4.2612 -  Say Y to compile the kernel to support NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory
  4.2613 -  Access).  This option is for configuring high-end multiprocessor
  4.2614 -  server machines.  If in doubt, say N.
  4.2615 -
  4.2616 -R41xx
  4.2617 -CONFIG_CPU_VR41XX
  4.2618 -  The options selects support for the NEC VR41xx series of processors.
  4.2619 -  Only choose this option if you have one of these processors as a
  4.2620 -  kernel built with this option will not run on any other type of
  4.2621 -  processor or vice versa.
  4.2622 -
  4.2623 -CPU feature configuration
  4.2624 -CONFIG_CPU_ADVANCED
  4.2625 -  Saying yes here allows you to select support for various features
  4.2626 -  your CPU may or may not have.  Most people should say N here.
  4.2627 -
  4.2628 -ll and sc instructions available
  4.2629 -CONFIG_CPU_HAS_LLSC
  4.2630 -  MIPS R4000 series and later provide the Load Linked (ll)
  4.2631 -  and Store Conditional (sc) instructions. More information is
  4.2632 -  available at <http://www.go-ecs.com/mips/miptek1.htm>.
  4.2633 -
  4.2634 -  Say Y here if your CPU has the ll and sc instructions.  Say Y here
  4.2635 -  for better performance, N if you don't know.  You must say Y here
  4.2636 -  for multiprocessor machines.
  4.2637 -
  4.2638 -lld and scd instructions available
  4.2639 -CONFIG_CPU_HAS_LLDSCD
  4.2640 -  Say Y here if your CPU has the lld and scd instructions, the 64-bit
  4.2641 -  equivalents of ll and sc.  Say Y here for better performance, N if
  4.2642 -  you don't know.  You must say Y here for multiprocessor machines.
  4.2643 -
  4.2644 -Writeback Buffer available
  4.2645 -CONFIG_CPU_HAS_WB
  4.2646 -  Say N here for slightly better performance.  You must say Y here for
  4.2647 -  machines which require flushing of write buffers in software.  Saying
  4.2648 -  Y is the safe option; N may result in kernel malfunction and crashes.
  4.2649 -
  4.2650 -Support for large 64-bit configurations
  4.2651 -CONFIG_MIPS_INSANE_LARGE
  4.2652 -  MIPS R10000 does support a 44 bit / 16TB address space as opposed to
  4.2653 -  previous 64-bit processors which only supported 40 bit / 1TB. If you
  4.2654 -  need processes of more than 1TB virtual address space, say Y here.
  4.2655 -  This will result in additional memory usage, so it is not
  4.2656 -  recommended for normal users.
  4.2657 -
  4.2658 -Generate little endian code
  4.2659 -CONFIG_CPU_LITTLE_ENDIAN
  4.2660 -  Some MIPS machines can be configured for either little or big endian
  4.2661 -  byte order. These modes require different kernels. Say Y if your
  4.2662 -  machine is little endian, N if it's a big endian machine.
  4.2663 -
  4.2664 -Use power LED as a heartbeat
  4.2665 -CONFIG_HEARTBEAT
  4.2666 -  Use the power-on LED on your machine as a load meter.  The exact
  4.2667 -  behaviour is platform-dependent, but normally the flash frequency is
  4.2668 -  a hyperbolic function of the 5-minute load average.
  4.2669 -
  4.2670 -Networking support
  4.2671 -CONFIG_NET
  4.2672 -  Unless you really know what you are doing, you should say Y here.
  4.2673 -  The reason is that some programs need kernel networking support even
  4.2674 -  when running on a stand-alone machine that isn't connected to any
  4.2675 -  other computer. If you are upgrading from an older kernel, you
  4.2676 -  should consider updating your networking tools too because changes
  4.2677 -  in the kernel and the tools often go hand in hand. The tools are
  4.2678 -  contained in the package net-tools, the location and version number
  4.2679 -  of which are given in <file:Documentation/Changes>.
  4.2680 -
  4.2681 -  For a general introduction to Linux networking, it is highly
  4.2682 -  recommended to read the NET-HOWTO, available from
  4.2683 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.2684 -
  4.2685 -Socket filtering
  4.2686 -CONFIG_FILTER
  4.2687 -  The Linux Socket Filter is derived from the Berkeley Packet Filter.
  4.2688 -  If you say Y here, user-space programs can attach a filter to any
  4.2689 -  socket and thereby tell the kernel that it should allow or disallow
  4.2690 -  certain types of data to get through the socket.  Linux Socket
  4.2691 -  Filtering works on all socket types except TCP for now.  See the
  4.2692 -  text file <file:Documentation/networking/filter.txt> for more
  4.2693 -  information.
  4.2694 -
  4.2695 -  You need to say Y here if you want to use PPP packet filtering
  4.2696 -  (see the CONFIG_PPP_FILTER option below).
  4.2697 -
  4.2698 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.2699 -
  4.2700 -Network packet filtering (replaces ipchains)
  4.2701 -CONFIG_NETFILTER
  4.2702 -  Netfilter is a framework for filtering and mangling network packets
  4.2703 -  that pass through your Linux box.
  4.2704 -
  4.2705 -  The most common use of packet filtering is to run your Linux box as
  4.2706 -  a firewall protecting a local network from the Internet. The type of
  4.2707 -  firewall provided by this kernel support is called a "packet
  4.2708 -  filter", which means that it can reject individual network packets
  4.2709 -  based on type, source, destination etc. The other kind of firewall,
  4.2710 -  a "proxy-based" one, is more secure but more intrusive and more
  4.2711 -  bothersome to set up; it inspects the network traffic much more
  4.2712 -  closely, modifies it and has knowledge about the higher level
  4.2713 -  protocols, which a packet filter lacks. Moreover, proxy-based
  4.2714 -  firewalls often require changes to the programs running on the local
  4.2715 -  clients. Proxy-based firewalls don't need support by the kernel, but
  4.2716 -  they are often combined with a packet filter, which only works if
  4.2717 -  you say Y here.
  4.2718 -
  4.2719 -  You should also say Y here if you intend to use your Linux box as
  4.2720 -  the gateway to the Internet for a local network of machines without
  4.2721 -  globally valid IP addresses. This is called "masquerading": if one
  4.2722 -  of the computers on your local network wants to send something to
  4.2723 -  the outside, your box can "masquerade" as that computer, i.e. it
  4.2724 -  forwards the traffic to the intended outside destination, but
  4.2725 -  modifies the packets to make it look like they came from the
  4.2726 -  firewall box itself. It works both ways: if the outside host
  4.2727 -  replies, the Linux box will silently forward the traffic to the
  4.2728 -  correct local computer. This way, the computers on your local net
  4.2729 -  are completely invisible to the outside world, even though they can
  4.2730 -  reach the outside and can receive replies. It is even possible to
  4.2731 -  run globally visible servers from within a masqueraded local network
  4.2732 -  using a mechanism called portforwarding. Masquerading is also often
  4.2733 -  called NAT (Network Address Translation).
  4.2734 -
  4.2735 -  Another use of Netfilter is in transparent proxying: if a machine on
  4.2736 -  the local network tries to connect to an outside host, your Linux
  4.2737 -  box can transparently forward the traffic to a local server,
  4.2738 -  typically a caching proxy server.
  4.2739 -
  4.2740 -  Various modules exist for netfilter which replace the previous
  4.2741 -  masquerading (ipmasqadm), packet filtering (ipchains), transparent
  4.2742 -  proxying, and portforwarding mechanisms. Please see
  4.2743 -  <file:Documentation/Changes> under "iptables" for the location of
  4.2744 -  these packages.
  4.2745 -
  4.2746 -  Make sure to say N to "Fast switching" below if you intend to say Y
  4.2747 -  here, as Fast switching currently bypasses netfilter.
  4.2748 -
  4.2749 -  Chances are that you should say Y here if you compile a kernel which
  4.2750 -  will run as a router and N for regular hosts. If unsure, say N.
  4.2751 -
  4.2752 -Network packet filtering debugging
  4.2753 -CONFIG_NETFILTER_DEBUG
  4.2754 -  You can say Y here if you want to get additional messages useful in
  4.2755 -  debugging the netfilter code.
  4.2756 -
  4.2757 -Connection tracking (required for masq/NAT)
  4.2758 -CONFIG_IP_NF_CONNTRACK
  4.2759 -  Connection tracking keeps a record of what packets have passed
  4.2760 -  through your machine, in order to figure out how they are related
  4.2761 -  into connections.
  4.2762 -
  4.2763 -  This is required to do Masquerading or other kinds of Network
  4.2764 -  Address Translation (except for Fast NAT).  It can also be used to
  4.2765 -  enhance packet filtering (see `Connection state match support'
  4.2766 -  below).
  4.2767 -
  4.2768 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2769 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2770 -
  4.2771 -Amanda protocol support
  4.2772 -CONFIG_IP_NF_AMANDA
  4.2773 -  If you are running the Amanda backup package (http://www.amanda.org/)
  4.2774 -  on this machine or machines that will be MASQUERADED through this
  4.2775 -  machine, then you may want to enable this feature.  This allows the
  4.2776 -  connection tracking and natting code to allow the sub-channels that
  4.2777 -  Amanda requires for communication of the backup data, messages and
  4.2778 -  index.
  4.2779 -
  4.2780 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2781 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2782 -
  4.2783 -
  4.2784 -IRC Send/Chat protocol support
  4.2785 -CONFIG_IP_NF_IRC
  4.2786 -  There is a commonly-used extension to IRC called
  4.2787 -  Direct Client-to-Client Protocol (DCC).  This enables users to send
  4.2788 -  files to each other, and also chat to each other without the need
  4.2789 -  of a server.  DCC Sending is used anywhere you send files over IRC,
  4.2790 -  and DCC Chat is most commonly used by Eggdrop bots.  If you are
  4.2791 -  using NAT, this extension will enable you to send files and initiate
  4.2792 -  chats.  Note that you do NOT need this extension to get files or
  4.2793 -  have others initiate chats, or everything else in IRC.
  4.2794 -
  4.2795 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say 'M' here and read
  4.2796 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.2797 -
  4.2798 -TFTP protocol support
  4.2799 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TFTP
  4.2800 -  TFTP connection tracking helper, this is required depending
  4.2801 -  on how restrictive your ruleset is.
  4.2802 -  If you are using a tftp client behind -j SNAT or -j MASQUERADING
  4.2803 -  you will need this.
  4.2804 -
  4.2805 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2806 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `Y'.
  4.2807 -
  4.2808 -FTP protocol support
  4.2809 -CONFIG_IP_NF_FTP
  4.2810 -  Tracking FTP connections is problematic: special helpers are
  4.2811 -  required for tracking them, and doing masquerading and other forms
  4.2812 -  of Network Address Translation on them.
  4.2813 -
  4.2814 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2815 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `Y'.
  4.2816 -
  4.2817 -User space queueing via NETLINK
  4.2818 -CONFIG_IP_NF_QUEUE
  4.2819 -  Netfilter has the ability to queue packets to user space: the
  4.2820 -  netlink device can be used to access them using this driver.
  4.2821 -
  4.2822 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2823 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2824 -
  4.2825 -IP tables support (required for filtering/masq/NAT)
  4.2826 -CONFIG_IP_NF_IPTABLES
  4.2827 -  iptables is a general, extensible packet identification framework.
  4.2828 -  The packet filtering and full NAT (masquerading, port forwarding,
  4.2829 -  etc) subsystems now use this: say `Y' or `M' here if you want to use
  4.2830 -  either of those.
  4.2831 -
  4.2832 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2833 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2834 -
  4.2835 -recent match support
  4.2836 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_RECENT
  4.2837 -  This match is used for creating one or many lists of recently
  4.2838 -  used addresses and then matching against that/those list(s).
  4.2839 -
  4.2840 -  Short options are available by using 'iptables -m recent -h'
  4.2841 -  Official Website: <http://snowman.net/projects/ipt_recent/>
  4.2842 -
  4.2843 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2844 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2845 -
  4.2846 -limit match support
  4.2847 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_LIMIT
  4.2848 -  limit matching allows you to control the rate at which a rule can be
  4.2849 -  matched: mainly useful in combination with the LOG target ("LOG
  4.2850 -  target support", below) and to avoid some Denial of Service attacks.
  4.2851 -
  4.2852 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2853 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2854 -
  4.2855 -skb->pkt_type packet match support
  4.2856 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_PKTTYPE
  4.2857 -  This patch allows you to match packet in accrodance
  4.2858 -  to its "class", eg. BROADCAST, MULTICAST, ...
  4.2859 -  
  4.2860 -  Typical usage:
  4.2861 -  iptables -A INPUT -m pkttype --pkt-type broadcast -j LOG
  4.2862 -  
  4.2863 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2864 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2865 -
  4.2866 -MAC address match support
  4.2867 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MAC
  4.2868 -  MAC matching allows you to match packets based on the source
  4.2869 -  Ethernet address of the packet.
  4.2870 -
  4.2871 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2872 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2873 -
  4.2874 -Netfilter MARK match support
  4.2875 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MARK
  4.2876 -  Netfilter mark matching allows you to match packets based on the
  4.2877 -  `nfmark' value in the packet.  This can be set by the MARK target
  4.2878 -  (see below).
  4.2879 -
  4.2880 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2881 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2882 -
  4.2883 -Multiple port match support
  4.2884 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MULTIPORT
  4.2885 -  Multiport matching allows you to match TCP or UDP packets based on
  4.2886 -  a series of source or destination ports: normally a rule can only
  4.2887 -  match a single range of ports.
  4.2888 -
  4.2889 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2890 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2891 -
  4.2892 -TTL match support
  4.2893 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TTL
  4.2894 -  This adds CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TTL option, which enabled the user
  4.2895 -  to match packets by their TTL value.
  4.2896 -
  4.2897 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2898 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2899 -
  4.2900 -LENGTH match support
  4.2901 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_LENGTH
  4.2902 -  This option allows you to match the length of a packet against a
  4.2903 -  specific value or range of values.
  4.2904 -
  4.2905 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2906 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2907 -
  4.2908 -AH/ESP match support
  4.2909 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_AH_ESP
  4.2910 -  These two match extensions (`ah' and `esp') allow you to match a
  4.2911 -  range of SPIs inside AH or ESP headers of IPSec packets.
  4.2912 -
  4.2913 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2914 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2915 -
  4.2916 -DSCP match support
  4.2917 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_DSCP
  4.2918 -  This option adds a `DSCP' match, which allows you to match against
  4.2919 -  the IPv4 header DSCP field (DSCP codepoint).
  4.2920 -
  4.2921 -  The DSCP codepoint can have any value between 0x0 and 0x4f.
  4.2922 -
  4.2923 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2924 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2925 -
  4.2926 - 
  4.2927 -
  4.2928 -ECN match support
  4.2929 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_ECN
  4.2930 -  This option adds a `ECN' match, which allows you to match against
  4.2931 -  the IPv4 and TCP header ECN fields.
  4.2932 -
  4.2933 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2934 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2935 -
  4.2936 - 
  4.2937 -
  4.2938 -TOS match support
  4.2939 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TOS
  4.2940 -  TOS matching allows you to match packets based on the Type Of
  4.2941 -  Service fields of the IP packet.
  4.2942 -
  4.2943 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2944 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2945 -
  4.2946 -conntrack match support
  4.2947 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_CONNTRACK
  4.2948 -  This is a general conntrack match module, a superset of the state match.
  4.2949 -
  4.2950 -  It allows matching on additional conntrack information, which is
  4.2951 -  useful in complex configurations, such as NAT gateways with multiple
  4.2952 -  internet links or tunnels.
  4.2953 -
  4.2954 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2955 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2956 -
  4.2957 -
  4.2958 -Connection state match support
  4.2959 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_STATE
  4.2960 -  Connection state matching allows you to match packets based on their
  4.2961 -  relationship to a tracked connection (ie. previous packets).  This
  4.2962 -  is a powerful tool for packet classification.
  4.2963 -
  4.2964 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2965 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2966 -
  4.2967 -Unclean match support
  4.2968 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_UNCLEAN
  4.2969 -  Unclean packet matching matches any strange or invalid packets, by
  4.2970 -  looking at a series of fields in the IP, TCP, UDP and ICMP headers.
  4.2971 -
  4.2972 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2973 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2974 -
  4.2975 -Owner match support
  4.2976 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_OWNER
  4.2977 -  Packet owner matching allows you to match locally-generated packets
  4.2978 -  based on who created them: the user, group, process or session.
  4.2979 -
  4.2980 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2981 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2982 -
  4.2983 -Packet filtering
  4.2984 -CONFIG_IP_NF_FILTER
  4.2985 -  Packet filtering defines a table `filter', which has a series of
  4.2986 -  rules for simple packet filtering at local input, forwarding and
  4.2987 -  local output.  See the man page for iptables(8).
  4.2988 -
  4.2989 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2990 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.2991 -
  4.2992 -REJECT target support
  4.2993 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_REJECT
  4.2994 -  The REJECT target allows a filtering rule to specify that an ICMP
  4.2995 -  error should be issued in response to an incoming packet, rather
  4.2996 -  than silently being dropped.
  4.2997 -
  4.2998 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.2999 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3000 -
  4.3001 -MIRROR target support
  4.3002 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MIRROR
  4.3003 -  The MIRROR target allows a filtering rule to specify that an
  4.3004 -  incoming packet should be bounced back to the sender.
  4.3005 -
  4.3006 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3007 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3008 -
  4.3009 -Local NAT support
  4.3010 -CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT_LOCAL
  4.3011 -  This option enables support for NAT of locally originated connections. 
  4.3012 -  Enable this if you need to use destination NAT on connections
  4.3013 -  originating from local processes on the nat box itself.
  4.3014 -
  4.3015 -  Please note that you will need a recent version (>= 1.2.6a)
  4.3016 -  of the iptables userspace program in order to use this feature.
  4.3017 -  See <http://www.iptables.org/> for download instructions.
  4.3018 -
  4.3019 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3020 -
  4.3021 -
  4.3022 -Full NAT (Network Address Translation)
  4.3023 -CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT
  4.3024 -  The Full NAT option allows masquerading, port forwarding and other
  4.3025 -  forms of full Network Address Port Translation.  It is controlled by
  4.3026 -  the `nat' table in iptables: see the man page for iptables(8).
  4.3027 -
  4.3028 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3029 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3030 -
  4.3031 -MASQUERADE target support
  4.3032 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MASQUERADE
  4.3033 -  Masquerading is a special case of NAT: all outgoing connections are
  4.3034 -  changed to seem to come from a particular interface's address, and
  4.3035 -  if the interface goes down, those connections are lost.  This is
  4.3036 -  only useful for dialup accounts with dynamic IP address (ie. your IP
  4.3037 -  address will be different on next dialup).
  4.3038 -
  4.3039 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3040 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3041 -
  4.3042 -Basic SNMP-ALG support
  4.3043 -CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT_SNMP_BASIC
  4.3044 -
  4.3045 -  This module implements an Application Layer Gateway (ALG) for
  4.3046 -  SNMP payloads.  In conjunction with NAT, it allows a network
  4.3047 -  management system to access multiple private networks with
  4.3048 -  conflicting addresses.  It works by modifying IP addresses
  4.3049 -  inside SNMP payloads to match IP-layer NAT mapping.
  4.3050 -
  4.3051 -  This is the "basic" form of SNMP-ALG, as described in RFC 2962
  4.3052 -
  4.3053 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3054 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3055 -
  4.3056 -REDIRECT target support
  4.3057 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_REDIRECT
  4.3058 -  REDIRECT is a special case of NAT: all incoming connections are
  4.3059 -  mapped onto the incoming interface's address, causing the packets to
  4.3060 -  come to the local machine instead of passing through.  This is
  4.3061 -  useful for transparent proxies.
  4.3062 -
  4.3063 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3064 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3065 -
  4.3066 -Packet mangling
  4.3067 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MANGLE
  4.3068 -  This option adds a `mangle' table to iptables: see the man page for
  4.3069 -  iptables(8).  This table is used for various packet alterations
  4.3070 -  which can effect how the packet is routed.
  4.3071 -
  4.3072 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3073 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3074 -
  4.3075 -DSCP target support
  4.3076 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_DSCP
  4.3077 -  This option adds a `DSCP' target, which allows you to create rules in
  4.3078 -  the iptables mangle table. The selected packet has the DSCP field set
  4.3079 -  to the hex value provided on the command line; unlike the TOS target
  4.3080 -  which will only set the legal values within ip.h.
  4.3081 -
  4.3082 -  The DSCP field can be set to any value between 0x0 and 0x4f. It does
  4.3083 -  take into account that bits 6 and 7 are used by ECN.
  4.3084 -
  4.3085 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3086 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3087 -
  4.3088 - 
  4.3089 -
  4.3090 -ECN target support
  4.3091 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_ECN
  4.3092 -  This option adds a `ECN' target, which can be used in the iptables mangle
  4.3093 -  table.  
  4.3094 -
  4.3095 -  You can use this target to remove the ECN bits from the IPv4 header of
  4.3096 -  an IP packet.  This is particularly useful, if you need to work around
  4.3097 -  existing ECN blackholes on the internet, but don't want to disable
  4.3098 -  ECN support in general.
  4.3099 -
  4.3100 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3101 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3102 -
  4.3103 - 
  4.3104 -
  4.3105 -TOS target support
  4.3106 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TOS
  4.3107 -  This option adds a `TOS' target, which allows you to create rules in
  4.3108 -  the `mangle' table which alter the Type Of Service field of an IP
  4.3109 -  packet prior to routing.
  4.3110 -
  4.3111 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3112 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3113 -
  4.3114 -MARK target support
  4.3115 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MARK
  4.3116 -  This option adds a `MARK' target, which allows you to create rules
  4.3117 -  in the `mangle' table which alter the netfilter mark (nfmark) field
  4.3118 -  associated with the packet prior to routing. This can change
  4.3119 -  the routing method (see `Use netfilter MARK value as routing
  4.3120 -  key') and can also be used by other subsystems to change their
  4.3121 -  behaviour.
  4.3122 -
  4.3123 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3124 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3125 -
  4.3126 -TCPMSS target support
  4.3127 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS
  4.3128 -  This option adds a `TCPMSS' target, which allows you to alter the
  4.3129 -  MSS value of TCP SYN packets, to control the maximum size for that
  4.3130 -  connection (usually limiting it to your outgoing interface's MTU
  4.3131 -  minus 40).
  4.3132 -
  4.3133 -  This is used to overcome criminally braindead ISPs or servers which
  4.3134 -  block ICMP Fragmentation Needed packets.  The symptoms of this
  4.3135 -  problem are that everything works fine from your Linux
  4.3136 -  firewall/router, but machines behind it can never exchange large
  4.3137 -  packets:
  4.3138 -	1) Web browsers connect, then hang with no data received.
  4.3139 -	2) Small mail works fine, but large emails hang.
  4.3140 -	3) ssh works fine, but scp hangs after initial handshaking.
  4.3141 -
  4.3142 -  Workaround: activate this option and add a rule to your firewall
  4.3143 -  configuration like:
  4.3144 -
  4.3145 -        iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN \
  4.3146 -		 -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu
  4.3147 -
  4.3148 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3149 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3150 -
  4.3151 -Helper match support
  4.3152 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_HELPER
  4.3153 -  Helper matching allows you to match packets in dynamic connections
  4.3154 -  tracked by a conntrack-helper, ie. ip_conntrack_ftp
  4.3155 -
  4.3156 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3157 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `Y'.
  4.3158 -
  4.3159 -TCPMSS match support
  4.3160 -CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TCPMSS
  4.3161 -  This option adds a `tcpmss' match, which allows you to examine the
  4.3162 -  MSS value of TCP SYN packets, which control the maximum packet size
  4.3163 -  for that connection.
  4.3164 -
  4.3165 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3166 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3167 -
  4.3168 -ULOG target support
  4.3169 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_ULOG
  4.3170 -  This option adds a `ULOG' target, which allows you to create rules in
  4.3171 -  any iptables table. The packet is passed to a userspace logging
  4.3172 -  daemon using netlink multicast sockets; unlike the LOG target
  4.3173 -  which can only be viewed through syslog.
  4.3174 -
  4.3175 -  The appropriate userspace logging daemon (ulogd) may be obtained from
  4.3176 -  <http://www.gnumonks.org/projects/ulogd>
  4.3177 -
  4.3178 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3179 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3180 -
  4.3181 -LOG target support
  4.3182 -CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_LOG
  4.3183 -  This option adds a `LOG' target, which allows you to create rules in
  4.3184 -  any iptables table which records the packet header to the syslog.
  4.3185 -
  4.3186 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3187 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3188 -
  4.3189 -ipchains (2.2-style) support
  4.3190 -CONFIG_IP_NF_COMPAT_IPCHAINS
  4.3191 -  This option places ipchains (with masquerading and redirection
  4.3192 -  support) back into the kernel, using the new netfilter
  4.3193 -  infrastructure.  It is not recommended for new installations (see
  4.3194 -  `Packet filtering').  With this enabled, you should be able to use
  4.3195 -  the ipchains tool exactly as in 2.2 kernels.
  4.3196 -
  4.3197 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3198 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3199 -
  4.3200 -ipfwadm (2.0-style) support
  4.3201 -CONFIG_IP_NF_COMPAT_IPFWADM
  4.3202 -  This option places ipfwadm (with masquerading and redirection
  4.3203 -  support) back into the kernel, using the new netfilter
  4.3204 -  infrastructure.  It is not recommended for new installations (see
  4.3205 -  `Packet filtering').  With this enabled, you should be able to use
  4.3206 -  the ipfwadm tool exactly as in 2.0 kernels.
  4.3207 -
  4.3208 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3209 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3210 -
  4.3211 -EUI64 address check (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.3212 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_EUI64
  4.3213 -  This module performs checking on the IPv6 source address
  4.3214 -  Compares the last 64 bits with the EUI64 (delivered
  4.3215 -  from the MAC address) address
  4.3216 -
  4.3217 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3218 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3219 -
  4.3220 -MAC address match support
  4.3221 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_MAC
  4.3222 -  mac matching allows you to match packets based on the source
  4.3223 -  Ethernet address of the packet.
  4.3224 -
  4.3225 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3226 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3227 -
  4.3228 -length match support
  4.3229 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_LENGTH
  4.3230 -  This option allows you to match the length of a packet against a
  4.3231 -  specific value or range of values.
  4.3232 -
  4.3233 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3234 -  Documentation/modules.txt.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3235 -
  4.3236 -Netfilter MARK match support
  4.3237 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_MARK
  4.3238 -  Netfilter mark matching allows you to match packets based on the
  4.3239 -  `nfmark' value in the packet.  This can be set by the MARK target
  4.3240 -  (see below).
  4.3241 -
  4.3242 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3243 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3244 -
  4.3245 -Multiple port match support
  4.3246 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_MULTIPORT
  4.3247 -  Multiport matching allows you to match TCP or UDP packets based on
  4.3248 -  a series of source or destination ports: normally a rule can only
  4.3249 -  match a single range of ports.
  4.3250 -
  4.3251 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3252 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3253 -
  4.3254 -IPV6 queue handler (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.3255 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_QUEUE
  4.3256 -
  4.3257 -  This option adds a queue handler to the kernel for IPv6
  4.3258 -  packets which lets us to receive the filtered packets
  4.3259 -  with QUEUE target using libiptc as we can do with
  4.3260 -  the IPv4 now.
  4.3261 -
  4.3262 -  (C) Fernando Anton 2001
  4.3263 -  IPv64 Project - Work based in IPv64 draft by Arturo Azcorra.
  4.3264 -  Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
  4.3265 -  Universidad Politecnica de Alcala de Henares
  4.3266 -  email: fanton@it.uc3m.es
  4.3267 -
  4.3268 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3269 -  Documentation/modules.txt. If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3270 -
  4.3271 -Owner match support
  4.3272 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_OWNER
  4.3273 -  Packet owner matching allows you to match locally-generated packets
  4.3274 -  based on who created them: the user, group, process or session.
  4.3275 -
  4.3276 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3277 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3278 -
  4.3279 -Packet filtering
  4.3280 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_FILTER
  4.3281 -  Packet filtering defines a table `filter', which has a series of
  4.3282 -  rules for simple packet filtering at local input, forwarding and
  4.3283 -  local output.  See the man page for iptables(8).
  4.3284 -
  4.3285 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3286 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3287 -
  4.3288 -Packet mangling
  4.3289 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MANGLE
  4.3290 -  This option adds a `mangle' table to iptables: see the man page for
  4.3291 -  iptables(8).  This table is used for various packet alterations
  4.3292 -  which can effect how the packet is routed.
  4.3293 -
  4.3294 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3295 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3296 -
  4.3297 -MARK target support
  4.3298 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_TARGET_MARK
  4.3299 -  This option adds a `MARK' target, which allows you to create rules
  4.3300 -  in the `mangle' table which alter the netfilter mark (nfmark) field
  4.3301 -  associated with the packet packet prior to routing. This can change
  4.3302 -  the routing method (see `Use netfilter MARK value as routing
  4.3303 -  key') and can also be used by other subsystems to change their
  4.3304 -  behaviour.
  4.3305 -
  4.3306 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3307 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3308 -
  4.3309 -ARP tables support
  4.3310 -CONFIG_IP_NF_ARPTABLES
  4.3311 -  arptables is a general, extensible packet identification framework.
  4.3312 -  The ARP packet filtering and mangling (manipulation)subsystems
  4.3313 -  use this: say Y or M here if you want to use either of those.
  4.3314 -
  4.3315 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3316 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3317 -
  4.3318 -ARP packet filtering
  4.3319 -CONFIG_IP_NF_ARPFILTER
  4.3320 -  ARP packet filtering defines a table `filter', which has a series of
  4.3321 -  rules for simple ARP packet filtering at local input and
  4.3322 -  local output.  See the man page for arptables(8).
  4.3323 -
  4.3324 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3325 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3326 -
  4.3327 -ARP payload mangling
  4.3328 -CONFIG_IP_NF_ARP_MANGLE
  4.3329 -  Allows altering the ARP packet payload: source and destination
  4.3330 -  hardware and network addresses.
  4.3331 -
  4.3332 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3333 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3334 -
  4.3335 -TCP Explicit Congestion Notification support
  4.3336 -CONFIG_INET_ECN
  4.3337 -  Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) allows routers to notify
  4.3338 -  clients about network congestion, resulting in fewer dropped packets
  4.3339 -  and increased network performance.  This option adds ECN support to
  4.3340 -  the Linux kernel, as well as a sysctl (/proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_ecn)
  4.3341 -  which allows ECN support to be disabled at runtime.
  4.3342 -
  4.3343 -  Note that, on the Internet, there are many broken firewalls which
  4.3344 -  refuse connections from ECN-enabled machines, and it may be a while
  4.3345 -  before these firewalls are fixed.  Until then, to access a site
  4.3346 -  behind such a firewall (some of which are major sites, at the time
  4.3347 -  of this writing) you will have to disable this option, either by
  4.3348 -  saying N now or by using the sysctl.
  4.3349 -
  4.3350 -  If in doubt, say N.
  4.3351 -
  4.3352 -IPv6 tables support (required for filtering/masq/NAT)
  4.3353 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_IPTABLES
  4.3354 -  ip6tables is a general, extensible packet identification framework.
  4.3355 -  Currently only the packet filtering and packet mangling subsystem
  4.3356 -  for IPv6 use this, but connection tracking is going to follow.
  4.3357 -  Say 'Y' or 'M' here if you want to use either of those.
  4.3358 -
  4.3359 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3360 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3361 -
  4.3362 -IPv6 limit match support
  4.3363 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_LIMIT
  4.3364 -  limit matching allows you to control the rate at which a rule can be
  4.3365 -  matched: mainly useful in combination with the LOG target ("LOG
  4.3366 -  target support", below) and to avoid some Denial of Service attacks.
  4.3367 -
  4.3368 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3369 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3370 -
  4.3371 -LOG target support
  4.3372 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_TARGET_LOG
  4.3373 -  This option adds a `LOG' target, which allows you to create rules in
  4.3374 -  any iptables table which records the packet header to the syslog.
  4.3375 -
  4.3376 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3377 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  If unsure, say `N'.
  4.3378 -
  4.3379 -IP: virtual server support
  4.3380 -CONFIG_IP_VS
  4.3381 -  IP Virtual Server support will let you build a high-performance
  4.3382 -  virtual server based on cluster of two or more real servers. This
  4.3383 -  option must be enabled for at least one of the clustered computers
  4.3384 -  that will take care of intercepting incomming connections to a
  4.3385 -  single IP address and scheduling them to real servers.
  4.3386 -
  4.3387 -  Three request dispatching techniques are implemented, they are
  4.3388 -  virtual server via NAT, virtual server via tunneling and virtual
  4.3389 -  server via direct routing. The several scheduling algorithms can
  4.3390 -  be used to choose which server the connection is directed to,
  4.3391 -  thus load balancing can be achieved among the servers.  For more
  4.3392 -  information and its administration program, please visit the
  4.3393 -  following URL:
  4.3394 -	http://www.linuxvirtualserver.org/
  4.3395 -
  4.3396 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3397 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3398 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3399 -
  4.3400 -IP virtual server debugging
  4.3401 -CONFIG_IP_VS_DEBUG
  4.3402 -  Say Y here if you want to get additional messages useful in
  4.3403 -  debugging the IP virtual server code. You can change the debug
  4.3404 -  level in /proc/sys/net/ipv4/vs/debug_level
  4.3405 -
  4.3406 -IPVS connection hash table size (the Nth power of 2)
  4.3407 -CONFIG_IP_VS_TAB_BITS
  4.3408 -  The IPVS connection hash table uses the chaining scheme to handle
  4.3409 -  hash collisions. Using a big IPVS connection hash table will greatly
  4.3410 -  reduce conflicts when there are hundreds of thousands of connections
  4.3411 -  in the hash table.
  4.3412 -
  4.3413 -  Note the table size must be power of 2. The table size will be the
  4.3414 -  value of 2 to the your input number power. The number to choose is
  4.3415 -  from 8 to 20, the default number is 12, which means the table size
  4.3416 -  is 4096. Don't input the number too small, otherwise you will lose
  4.3417 -  performance on it. You can adapt the table size yourself, according
  4.3418 -  to your virtual server application. It is good to set the table size
  4.3419 -  not far less than the number of connections per second multiplying
  4.3420 -  average lasting time of connection in the table.  For example, your
  4.3421 -  virtual server gets 200 connections per second, the connection lasts
  4.3422 -  for 200 seconds in average in the connection table, the table size
  4.3423 -  should be not far less than 200x200, it is good to set the table
  4.3424 -  size 32768 (2**15).
  4.3425 -
  4.3426 -  Another note that each connection occupies 128 bytes effectively and
  4.3427 -  each hash entry uses 8 bytes, so you can estimate how much memory is
  4.3428 -  needed for your box.
  4.3429 -
  4.3430 -IPVS: round-robin scheduling
  4.3431 -CONFIG_IP_VS_RR
  4.3432 -  The robin-robin scheduling algorithm simply directs network
  4.3433 -  connections to different real servers in a round-robin manner.
  4.3434 -
  4.3435 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3436 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3437 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3438 -
  4.3439 -IPVS: weighted round-robin scheduling
  4.3440 -CONFIG_IP_VS_WRR
  4.3441 -  The weighted robin-robin scheduling algorithm directs network
  4.3442 -  connections to different real servers based on server weights
  4.3443 -  in a round-robin manner. Servers with higher weights receive
  4.3444 -  new connections first than those with less weights, and servers
  4.3445 -  with higher weights get more connections than those with less
  4.3446 -  weights and servers with equal weights get equal connections.
  4.3447 -
  4.3448 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3449 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3450 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3451 -
  4.3452 -IPVS: least-connection scheduling
  4.3453 -CONFIG_IP_VS_LC
  4.3454 -  The least-connection scheduling algorithm directs network
  4.3455 -  connections to the server with the least number of active 
  4.3456 -  connections.
  4.3457 -
  4.3458 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3459 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3460 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3461 -
  4.3462 -IPVS: weighted least-connection scheduling
  4.3463 -CONFIG_IP_VS_WLC
  4.3464 -  The weighted least-connection scheduling algorithm directs network
  4.3465 -  connections to the server with the least active connections
  4.3466 -  normalized by the server weight.
  4.3467 -
  4.3468 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3469 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3470 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3471 -
  4.3472 -IPVS: locality-based least-connection scheduling
  4.3473 -CONFIG_IP_VS_LBLC
  4.3474 -  The locality-based least-connection scheduling algorithm is for
  4.3475 -  destination IP load balancing. It is usually used in cache cluster.
  4.3476 -  This algorithm usually directs packet destined for an IP address to
  4.3477 -  its server if the server is alive and under load. If the server is
  4.3478 -  overloaded (its active connection numbers is larger than its weight)
  4.3479 -  and there is a server in its half load, then allocate the weighted
  4.3480 -  least-connection server to this IP address.
  4.3481 -
  4.3482 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3483 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3484 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3485 -
  4.3486 -IPVS: locality-based least-connection with replication scheduling
  4.3487 -CONFIG_IP_VS_LBLCR
  4.3488 -  The locality-based least-connection with replication scheduling
  4.3489 -  algorithm is also for destination IP load balancing. It is 
  4.3490 -  usually used in cache cluster. It differs from the LBLC scheduling
  4.3491 -  as follows: the load balancer maintains mappings from a target
  4.3492 -  to a set of server nodes that can serve the target. Requests for
  4.3493 -  a target are assigned to the least-connection node in the target's
  4.3494 -  server set. If all the node in the server set are over loaded,
  4.3495 -  it picks up a least-connection node in the cluster and adds it
  4.3496 -  in the sever set for the target. If the server set has not been
  4.3497 -  modified for the specified time, the most loaded node is removed
  4.3498 -  from the server set, in order to avoid high degree of replication.
  4.3499 -
  4.3500 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3501 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3502 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3503 -
  4.3504 -IPVS: destination hashing scheduling
  4.3505 -CONFIG_IP_VS_DH
  4.3506 -  The destination hashing scheduling algorithm assigns network
  4.3507 -  connections to the servers through looking up a statically assigned
  4.3508 -  hash table by their destination IP addresses.
  4.3509 -
  4.3510 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3511 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3512 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3513 -
  4.3514 -IPVS: source hashing scheduling
  4.3515 -CONFIG_IP_VS_SH
  4.3516 -  The source hashing scheduling algorithm assigns network
  4.3517 -  connections to the servers through looking up a statically assigned
  4.3518 -  hash table by their source IP addresses.
  4.3519 -
  4.3520 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3521 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3522 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3523 -
  4.3524 -IPVS: shortest expected delay scheduling
  4.3525 -CONFIG_IP_VS_SED
  4.3526 -  The shortest expected delay scheduling algorithm assigns network
  4.3527 -  connections to the server with the shortest expected delay. The 
  4.3528 -  expected delay that the job will experience is (Ci + 1) / Ui if 
  4.3529 -  sent to the ith server, in which Ci is the number of connections
  4.3530 -  on the the ith server and Ui is the fixed service rate (weight)
  4.3531 -  of the ith server.
  4.3532 -
  4.3533 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3534 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3535 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3536 -
  4.3537 -IPVS: never queue scheduling
  4.3538 -CONFIG_IP_VS_NQ
  4.3539 -  The never queue scheduling algorithm adopts a two-speed model.
  4.3540 -  When there is an idle server available, the job will be sent to
  4.3541 -  the idle server, instead of waiting for a fast one. When there
  4.3542 -  is no idle server available, the job will be sent to the server
  4.3543 -  that minimize its expected delay (The Shortest Expected Delay
  4.3544 -  scheduling algorithm).
  4.3545 -
  4.3546 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3547 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3548 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3549 -
  4.3550 -IPVS: FTP protocol helper
  4.3551 -CONFIG_IP_VS_FTP
  4.3552 -  FTP is a protocol that transfers IP address and/or port number in
  4.3553 -  the payload. In the virtual server via Network Address Translation,
  4.3554 -  the IP address and port number of real servers cannot be sent to
  4.3555 -  clients in ftp connections directly, so FTP protocol helper is
  4.3556 -  required for tracking the connection and mangling it back to that of
  4.3557 -  virtual service.
  4.3558 -
  4.3559 -  If you want to compile it in kernel, say Y. If you want to compile
  4.3560 -  it as a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. If
  4.3561 -  unsure, say N.
  4.3562 -
  4.3563 -AH/ESP match support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.3564 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_AHESP
  4.3565 -  This module allows one to match AH and ESP packets.
  4.3566 -
  4.3567 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3568 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The modules will be called
  4.3569 -  ip6t_ah.o and ip6t_esp.o.
  4.3570 -
  4.3571 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3572 -
  4.3573 -Routing header match support
  4.3574 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_RT
  4.3575 -  rt matching allows you to match packets based on the routing
  4.3576 -  header of the packet.
  4.3577 -
  4.3578 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3579 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.3580 -  ip6t_rt.o.
  4.3581 -
  4.3582 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3583 -
  4.3584 -Hop-by-hop and Dst opts header match support
  4.3585 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_OPTS
  4.3586 -  This allows one to match packets based on the hop-by-hop
  4.3587 -  and destination options headers of a packet.
  4.3588 -
  4.3589 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3590 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The modules will be called
  4.3591 -  ip6t_hbh.o and ip6t_dst.o.
  4.3592 -
  4.3593 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3594 -
  4.3595 -Fragmentation header match support
  4.3596 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_FRAG
  4.3597 -  frag matching allows you to match packets based on the fragmentation
  4.3598 -  header of the packet.
  4.3599 -
  4.3600 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3601 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.3602 -  ip6t_frag.o.
  4.3603 -
  4.3604 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3605 -
  4.3606 -HL match support
  4.3607 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_HL
  4.3608 -  HL matching allows you to match packets based on the hop
  4.3609 -  limit of the packet.
  4.3610 -
  4.3611 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3612 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.3613 -  ip6t_hl.o.
  4.3614 -
  4.3615 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3616 -
  4.3617 -IPv6 Extension Headers Match (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.3618 -CONFIG_IP6_NF_MATCH_IPV6HEADER
  4.3619 -  This module allows one to match packets based upon
  4.3620 -  the ipv6 extension headers.
  4.3621 -
  4.3622 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.3623 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.3624 -  ip6t_ipv6header.o.
  4.3625 -
  4.3626 -  If unsure, say 'N'.
  4.3627 -
  4.3628 -SYN flood protection
  4.3629 -CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES
  4.3630 -  Normal TCP/IP networking is open to an attack known as "SYN
  4.3631 -  flooding". This denial-of-service attack prevents legitimate remote
  4.3632 -  users from being able to connect to your computer during an ongoing
  4.3633 -  attack and requires very little work from the attacker, who can
  4.3634 -  operate from anywhere on the Internet.
  4.3635 -
  4.3636 -  SYN cookies provide protection against this type of attack. If you
  4.3637 -  say Y here, the TCP/IP stack will use a cryptographic challenge
  4.3638 -  protocol known as "SYN cookies" to enable legitimate users to
  4.3639 -  continue to connect, even when your machine is under attack. There
  4.3640 -  is no need for the legitimate users to change their TCP/IP software;
  4.3641 -  SYN cookies work transparently to them. For technical information
  4.3642 -  about SYN cookies, check out <http://cr.yp.to/syncookies.html>.
  4.3643 -
  4.3644 -  If you are SYN flooded, the source address reported by the kernel is
  4.3645 -  likely to have been forged by the attacker; it is only reported as
  4.3646 -  an aid in tracing the packets to their actual source and should not
  4.3647 -  be taken as absolute truth.
  4.3648 -
  4.3649 -  SYN cookies may prevent correct error reporting on clients when the
  4.3650 -  server is really overloaded. If this happens frequently better turn
  4.3651 -  them off.
  4.3652 -
  4.3653 -  If you say Y here, note that SYN cookies aren't enabled by default;
  4.3654 -  you can enable them by saying Y to "/proc file system support" and
  4.3655 -  "Sysctl support" below and executing the command
  4.3656 -
  4.3657 -    echo 1 >/proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_syncookies
  4.3658 -
  4.3659 -  at boot time after the /proc file system has been mounted.
  4.3660 -
  4.3661 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.3662 -
  4.3663 -# Choice: alphatype
  4.3664 -Alpha system type
  4.3665 -CONFIG_ALPHA_GENERIC
  4.3666 -  This is the system type of your hardware.  A "generic" kernel will
  4.3667 -  run on any supported Alpha system. However, if you configure a
  4.3668 -  kernel for your specific system, it will be faster and smaller.
  4.3669 -
  4.3670 -  To find out what type of Alpha system you have, you may want to
  4.3671 -  check out the Linux/Alpha FAQ, accessible on the WWW from
  4.3672 -  <http://www.alphalinux.org/>. In summary:
  4.3673 -
  4.3674 -  Alcor/Alpha-XLT     AS 600
  4.3675 -  Alpha-XL            XL-233, XL-266
  4.3676 -  AlphaBook1          Alpha laptop
  4.3677 -  Avanti              AS 200, AS 205, AS 250, AS 255, AS 300, AS 400
  4.3678 -  Cabriolet           AlphaPC64, AlphaPCI64
  4.3679 -  DP264               DP264
  4.3680 -  EB164               EB164 21164 evaluation board
  4.3681 -  EB64+               EB64+ 21064 evaluation board
  4.3682 -  EB66                EB66 21066 evaluation board
  4.3683 -  EB66+               EB66+ 21066 evaluation board
  4.3684 -  Jensen              DECpc 150, DEC 2000 model 300,
  4.3685 -                      DEC 2000 model 500
  4.3686 -  LX164               AlphaPC164-LX
  4.3687 -  Miata               Personal Workstation 433a, 433au, 500a,
  4.3688 -                      500au, 600a, or 600au
  4.3689 -  Mikasa              AS 1000
  4.3690 -  Noname              AXPpci33, UDB (Multia)
  4.3691 -  Noritake            AS 1000A, AS 600A, AS 800
  4.3692 -  PC164               AlphaPC164
  4.3693 -  Rawhide             AS 1200, AS 4000, AS 4100
  4.3694 -  Ruffian             RPX164-2, AlphaPC164-UX, AlphaPC164-BX
  4.3695 -  SX164               AlphaPC164-SX
  4.3696 -  Sable               AS 2000, AS 2100
  4.3697 -  Shark		      DS 20L
  4.3698 -  Takara              Takara
  4.3699 -  Titan               Privateer
  4.3700 -  Wildfire            AlphaServer GS 40/80/160/320
  4.3701 -
  4.3702 -  If you don't know what to do, choose "generic".
  4.3703 -
  4.3704 -# Most of the information on these variants is from
  4.3705 -# <http://www.alphalinux.org/docs/alpha-howto.html>
  4.3706 -Alcor/Alpha-XLT
  4.3707 -CONFIG_ALPHA_ALCOR
  4.3708 -  For systems using the Digital ALCOR chipset: 5 chips (4, 64-bit data
  4.3709 -  slices (Data Switch, DSW) - 208-pin PQFP and 1 control (Control, I/O
  4.3710 -  Address, CIA) - a 383 pin plastic PGA).  It provides a DRAM
  4.3711 -  controller (256-bit memory bus) and a PCI interface.  It also does
  4.3712 -  all the work required to support an external Bcache and to maintain
  4.3713 -  memory coherence when a PCI device DMAs into (or out of) memory.
  4.3714 -
  4.3715 -Alpha-XL
  4.3716 -CONFIG_ALPHA_XL
  4.3717 -  XL-233 and XL-266-based Alpha systems.
  4.3718 -
  4.3719 -AlphaBook1
  4.3720 -CONFIG_ALPHA_BOOK1
  4.3721 -  Dec AlphaBook1/Burns Alpha-based laptops.
  4.3722 -
  4.3723 -Avanti
  4.3724 -CONFIG_ALPHA_AVANTI
  4.3725 -  Avanti AS 200, AS 205, AS 250, AS 255, AS 300, and AS 400-based
  4.3726 -  Alphas. Info at
  4.3727 -  <http://www.unix-ag.org/Linux-Alpha/Architectures/Avanti.html>.
  4.3728 -
  4.3729 -Cabriolet
  4.3730 -CONFIG_ALPHA_CABRIOLET
  4.3731 -  Cabriolet AlphaPC64, AlphaPCI64 systems.  Derived from EB64+ but now
  4.3732 -  baby-AT with Flash boot ROM, no on-board SCSI or Ethernet. 3 ISA
  4.3733 -  slots, 4 PCI slots (one pair are on a shared slot), uses plug-in
  4.3734 -  Bcache SIMMs.  Requires power supply with 3.3V output.
  4.3735 -
  4.3736 -DP264
  4.3737 -CONFIG_ALPHA_DP264
  4.3738 -  Various 21264 systems with the tsunami core logic chipset.
  4.3739 -  API Networks: 264DP, UP2000(+), CS20;
  4.3740 -  Compaq: DS10(E,L), XP900, XP1000, DS20(E), ES40.
  4.3741 -
  4.3742 -EB164
  4.3743 -CONFIG_ALPHA_EB164
  4.3744 -  EB164 21164 evaluation board from DEC.  Uses 21164 and ALCOR.  Has
  4.3745 -  ISA and PCI expansion (3 ISA slots, 2 64-bit PCI slots (one is
  4.3746 -  shared with an ISA slot) and 2 32-bit PCI slots.  Uses plus-in
  4.3747 -  Bcache SIMMs. I/O sub-system provides SuperI/O (2S, 1P, FD), KBD,
  4.3748 -  MOUSE (PS2 style), RTC/NVRAM.  Boot ROM is Flash.  PC-AT-sized
  4.3749 -  motherboard.  Requires power supply with 3.3V output.
  4.3750 -
  4.3751 -EB64+
  4.3752 -CONFIG_ALPHA_EB64P
  4.3753 -  Uses 21064 or 21064A and APECs.  Has ISA and PCI expansion (3 ISA,
  4.3754 -  2 PCI, one pair are on a shared slot). Supports 36-bit DRAM SIMs.
  4.3755 -  ISA bus generated by Intel SaturnI/O PCI-ISA bridge. On-board SCSI
  4.3756 -  (NCR 810 on PCI) Ethernet (Digital 21040), KBD, MOUSE (PS2 style),
  4.3757 -  SuperI/O (2S, 1P, FD), RTC/NVRAM. Boot ROM is EPROM.  PC-AT size.
  4.3758 -  Runs from standard PC power supply.
  4.3759 -
  4.3760 -EB66
  4.3761 -CONFIG_ALPHA_EB66
  4.3762 -  A Digital DS group board.  Uses 21066 or 21066A.  I/O sub-system is
  4.3763 -  identical to EB64+.  Baby PC-AT size.  Runs from standard PC power
  4.3764 -  supply.  The EB66 schematic was published as a marketing poster
  4.3765 -  advertising the 21066 as "the first microprocessor in the world with
  4.3766 -  embedded PCI".
  4.3767 -
  4.3768 -EB66+
  4.3769 -CONFIG_ALPHA_EB66P
  4.3770 -  Later variant of the EB66 board.
  4.3771 -
  4.3772 -Eiger
  4.3773 -CONFIG_ALPHA_EIGER
  4.3774 -  Apparently an obscure OEM single-board computer based on the
  4.3775 -  Typhoon/Tsunami chipset family. Information on it is scanty.
  4.3776 -
  4.3777 -Jensen
  4.3778 -CONFIG_ALPHA_JENSEN
  4.3779 -  DEC PC 150 AXP (aka Jensen): This is a very old Digital system - one
  4.3780 -  of the first-generation Alpha systems. A number of these systems
  4.3781 -  seem to be available on the second- hand market. The Jensen is a
  4.3782 -  floor-standing tower system which originally used a 150MHz 21064 It
  4.3783 -  used programmable logic to interface a 486 EISA I/O bridge to the
  4.3784 -  CPU.
  4.3785 -
  4.3786 -LX164
  4.3787 -CONFIG_ALPHA_LX164
  4.3788 -  A technical overview of this board is available at
  4.3789 -  <http://www.unix-ag.org/Linux-Alpha/Architectures/LX164.html>.
  4.3790 -
  4.3791 -Miata
  4.3792 -CONFIG_ALPHA_MIATA
  4.3793 -  The Digital PersonalWorkStation (PWS 433a, 433au, 500a, 500au, 600a,
  4.3794 -  or 600au).  There is an Installation HOWTO for this hardware at
  4.3795 -  <http://members.brabant.chello.nl/~s.vandereijk/miata.html>.
  4.3796 -
  4.3797 -Mikasa
  4.3798 -CONFIG_ALPHA_MIKASA
  4.3799 -  AlphaServer 1000-based Alpha systems.
  4.3800 -
  4.3801 -Nautilus
  4.3802 -CONFIG_ALPHA_NAUTILUS
  4.3803 -  Alpha systems based on the AMD 751 & ALI 1543C chipsets.
  4.3804 -
  4.3805 -Noname
  4.3806 -CONFIG_ALPHA_NONAME
  4.3807 -  The AXPpci33 (aka NoName), is based on the EB66 (includes the Multia
  4.3808 -  UDB).  This design was produced by Digital's Technical OEM (TOEM)
  4.3809 -  group. It uses the 21066 processor running at 166MHz or 233MHz. It
  4.3810 -  is a baby-AT size, and runs from a standard PC power supply. It has
  4.3811 -  5 ISA slots and 3 PCI slots (one pair are a shared slot). There are
  4.3812 -  2 versions, with either PS/2 or large DIN connectors for the
  4.3813 -  keyboard.
  4.3814 -
  4.3815 -Noritake
  4.3816 -CONFIG_ALPHA_NORITAKE
  4.3817 -  AlphaServer 1000A, AlphaServer 600A, and AlphaServer 800-based
  4.3818 -  systems.
  4.3819 -
  4.3820 -Rawhide
  4.3821 -CONFIG_ALPHA_RAWHIDE
  4.3822 -  AlphaServer 1200, AlphaServer 4000 and AlphaServer 4100 machines.
  4.3823 -  See HOWTO at
  4.3824 -  <http://www.alphalinux.org/docs/rawhide/4100_install.shtml>.
  4.3825 -
  4.3826 -Ruffian
  4.3827 -CONFIG_ALPHA_RUFFIAN
  4.3828 -  Samsung APC164UX.  There is a page on known problems and workarounds
  4.3829 -  at <http://www.alphalinux.org/faq/FAQ-11.html>.
  4.3830 -
  4.3831 -Sable
  4.3832 -CONFIG_ALPHA_SABLE
  4.3833 -  Digital AlphaServer 2000 and 2100-based systems.
  4.3834 -
  4.3835 -Takara
  4.3836 -CONFIG_ALPHA_TAKARA
  4.3837 -  Alpha 11164-based OEM single-board computer.
  4.3838 -
  4.3839 -Wildfire
  4.3840 -CONFIG_ALPHA_WILDFIRE
  4.3841 -  AlphaServer GS 40/80/160/320 SMP based on the EV67 core.
  4.3842 -
  4.3843 -EV5 CPU daughtercard (model 5/xxx)
  4.3844 -CONFIG_ALPHA_PRIMO
  4.3845 -  Say Y if you have an AS 1000 5/xxx or an AS 1000A 5/xxx.
  4.3846 -
  4.3847 -EV5 CPU(s) (model 5/xxx)
  4.3848 -CONFIG_ALPHA_GAMMA
  4.3849 -  Say Y if you have an AS 2000 5/xxx or an AS 2100 5/xxx.
  4.3850 -
  4.3851 -EV67 (or later) CPU (speed > 600MHz)?
  4.3852 -CONFIG_ALPHA_EV67
  4.3853 -  Is this a machine based on the EV67 core?  If in doubt, select N here
  4.3854 -  and the machine will be treated as an EV6.
  4.3855 -
  4.3856 -Use SRM as bootloader
  4.3857 -CONFIG_ALPHA_SRM
  4.3858 -  There are two different types of booting firmware on Alphas: SRM,
  4.3859 -  which is command line driven, and ARC, which uses menus and arrow
  4.3860 -  keys. Details about the Linux/Alpha booting process are contained in
  4.3861 -  the Linux/Alpha FAQ, accessible on the WWW from
  4.3862 -  <http://www.alphalinux.org/>.
  4.3863 -
  4.3864 -  The usual way to load Linux on an Alpha machine is to use MILO
  4.3865 -  (a bootloader that lets you pass command line parameters to the
  4.3866 -  kernel just like lilo does for the x86 architecture) which can be
  4.3867 -  loaded either from ARC or can be installed directly as a permanent
  4.3868 -  firmware replacement from floppy (which requires changing a certain
  4.3869 -  jumper on the motherboard). If you want to do either of these, say N
  4.3870 -  here. If MILO doesn't work on your system (true for Jensen
  4.3871 -  motherboards), you can bypass it altogether and boot Linux directly
  4.3872 -  from an SRM console; say Y here in order to do that. Note that you
  4.3873 -  won't be able to boot from an IDE disk using old versions of SRM.
  4.3874 -
  4.3875 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.3876 -
  4.3877 -Legacy kernel start address
  4.3878 -CONFIG_ALPHA_LEGACY_START_ADDRESS
  4.3879 -  The 2.4 kernel changed the kernel start address from 0x310000
  4.3880 -  to 0x810000 to make room for the Wildfire's larger SRM console.
  4.3881 -
  4.3882 -  If you're using aboot 0.7 or later, the bootloader will examine the
  4.3883 -  ELF headers to determine where to transfer control. Unfortunately,
  4.3884 -  most older bootloaders -- APB or MILO -- hardcoded the kernel start
  4.3885 -  address rather than examining the ELF headers, and the result is a
  4.3886 -  hard lockup.
  4.3887 -
  4.3888 -  Say Y if you have a broken bootloader.  Say N if you do not, or if
  4.3889 -  you wish to run on Wildfire.
  4.3890 -
  4.3891 -Large VMALLOC support
  4.3892 -CONFIG_ALPHA_LARGE_VMALLOC
  4.3893 -  Process creation and other aspects of virtual memory management can
  4.3894 -  be streamlined if we restrict the kernel to one PGD for all vmalloc
  4.3895 -  allocations.  This equates to about 8GB.
  4.3896 -
  4.3897 -  Under normal circumstances, this is so far and above what is needed
  4.3898 -  as to be laughable.  However, there are certain applications (such
  4.3899 -  as benchmark-grade in-kernel web serving) that can make use of as
  4.3900 -  much vmalloc space as is available.
  4.3901 -
  4.3902 -  Say N unless you know you need gobs and gobs of vmalloc space.
  4.3903 -
  4.3904 -Non-standard serial port support
  4.3905 -CONFIG_SERIAL_NONSTANDARD
  4.3906 -  Say Y here if you have any non-standard serial boards -- boards
  4.3907 -  which aren't supported using the standard "dumb" serial driver.
  4.3908 -  This includes intelligent serial boards such as Cyclades,
  4.3909 -  Digiboards, etc. These are usually used for systems that need many
  4.3910 -  serial ports because they serve many terminals or dial-in
  4.3911 -  connections.
  4.3912 -
  4.3913 -  Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
  4.3914 -  kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
  4.3915 -  the questions about non-standard serial boards.
  4.3916 -
  4.3917 -  Most people can say N here.
  4.3918 -
  4.3919 -Extended dumb serial driver options
  4.3920 -CONFIG_SERIAL_EXTENDED
  4.3921 -  If you wish to use any non-standard features of the standard "dumb"
  4.3922 -  driver, say Y here. This includes HUB6 support, shared serial
  4.3923 -  interrupts, special multiport support, support for more than the
  4.3924 -  four COM 1/2/3/4 boards, etc.
  4.3925 -
  4.3926 -  Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
  4.3927 -  kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
  4.3928 -  the questions about serial driver options. If unsure, say N.
  4.3929 -
  4.3930 -Support more than 4 serial ports
  4.3931 -CONFIG_SERIAL_MANY_PORTS
  4.3932 -  Say Y here if you have dumb serial boards other than the four
  4.3933 -  standard COM 1/2/3/4 ports. This may happen if you have an AST
  4.3934 -  FourPort, Accent Async, Boca (read the Boca mini-HOWTO, available
  4.3935 -  from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>), or other custom
  4.3936 -  serial port hardware which acts similar to standard serial port
  4.3937 -  hardware. If you only use the standard COM 1/2/3/4 ports, you can
  4.3938 -  say N here to save some memory. You can also say Y if you have an
  4.3939 -  "intelligent" multiport card such as Cyclades, Digiboards, etc.
  4.3940 -
  4.3941 -Support for sharing serial interrupts
  4.3942 -CONFIG_SERIAL_SHARE_IRQ
  4.3943 -  Some serial boards have hardware support which allows multiple dumb
  4.3944 -  serial ports on the same board to share a single IRQ. To enable
  4.3945 -  support for this in the serial driver, say Y here.
  4.3946 -
  4.3947 -Auto-detect IRQ on standard ports (unsafe)
  4.3948 -CONFIG_SERIAL_DETECT_IRQ
  4.3949 -  Say Y here if you want the kernel to try to guess which IRQ
  4.3950 -  to use for your serial port.
  4.3951 -
  4.3952 -  This is considered unsafe; it is far better to configure the IRQ in
  4.3953 -  a boot script using the setserial command.
  4.3954 -
  4.3955 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.3956 -
  4.3957 -Support special multiport boards
  4.3958 -CONFIG_SERIAL_MULTIPORT
  4.3959 -  Some multiport serial ports have special ports which are used to
  4.3960 -  signal when there are any serial ports on the board which need
  4.3961 -  servicing. Say Y here to enable the serial driver to take advantage
  4.3962 -  of those special I/O ports.
  4.3963 -
  4.3964 -SGI IP22 Zilog85C30 serial support
  4.3965 -CONFIG_IP22_SERIAL
  4.3966 -  If you want to use your IP22's built-in serial ports under Linux,
  4.3967 -  answer Y.
  4.3968 -
  4.3969 -SGI Newport Console support
  4.3970 -CONFIG_SGI_NEWPORT_CONSOLE
  4.3971 -  Say Y here if you want the console on the Newport aka XL graphics
  4.3972 -  card of your Indy.  Most people say Y here.
  4.3973 -
  4.3974 -SGI DS1286 RTC support
  4.3975 -CONFIG_SGI_DS1286
  4.3976 -  If you say Y here and create a character special file /dev/rtc with
  4.3977 -  major number 10 and minor number 135 using mknod ("man mknod"), you
  4.3978 -  will get access to the real time clock built into your computer.
  4.3979 -  Every SGI has such a clock built in. It reports status information
  4.3980 -  via the file /proc/rtc and its behaviour is set by various ioctls on
  4.3981 -  /dev/rtc.
  4.3982 -
  4.3983 -Dallas DS1742 RTC Support
  4.3984 -CONFIG_DS1742
  4.3985 -  If you say Y here and create a character special file /dev/rtc with
  4.3986 -  major number 10 and minor number 135 using mknod ("man mknod"), you
  4.3987 -  will get access to the real time clock present on various Toshiba
  4.3988 -  MIPS-based boards. It reports status information via the file
  4.3989 -  /proc/driver/rtc and its behaviour is set by various ioctls on
  4.3990 -  /dev/rtc or /dev/misc/rtc if using devfs.
  4.3991 -
  4.3992 -  For technical information and application notes, please see the
  4.3993 -  Dallas Semiconductor website:
  4.3994 -  <http://www.dalsemi.com/quick_view2.cfm?qv_pk=2768>.
  4.3995 -
  4.3996 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.3997 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.3998 -  The module is called ds1742.o. If you want to compile it as a module,
  4.3999 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4000 -
  4.4001 -Indy/I2 Hardware Watchdog
  4.4002 -CONFIG_INDYDOG
  4.4003 -  Hardwaredriver for the Indy's/I2's watchdog. This is a
  4.4004 -  watchdog timer that will reboot the machine after a 60 second 
  4.4005 -  timer expired and no process has written to /dev/watchdog during
  4.4006 -  that time.
  4.4007 -
  4.4008 -Support the Bell Technologies HUB6 card
  4.4009 -CONFIG_HUB6
  4.4010 -  Say Y here to enable support in the dumb serial driver to support
  4.4011 -  the HUB6 card.
  4.4012 -
  4.4013 -PCMCIA serial device support
  4.4014 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_SERIAL_CS
  4.4015 -  Say Y here to enable support for 16-bit PCMCIA serial devices,
  4.4016 -  including serial port cards, modems, and the modem functions of
  4.4017 -  multi-function Ethernet/modem cards. (PCMCIA- or PC-cards are
  4.4018 -  credit-card size devices often used with laptops.)
  4.4019 -
  4.4020 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4021 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4022 -  The module will be called serial_cs.o.  If you want to compile it as
  4.4023 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4024 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.4025 -
  4.4026 -CONFIG_SYNCLINK_CS
  4.4027 -  Enable support for the SyncLink PC Card serial adapter, running
  4.4028 -  asynchronous and HDLC communications up to 512Kbps. The port is
  4.4029 -  selectable for RS-232, V.35, RS-449, RS-530, and X.21
  4.4030 -
  4.4031 -  This driver may be built as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4032 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4033 -  The module will be called synclinkmp.o.  If you want to do that, say M
  4.4034 -  here.
  4.4035 -
  4.4036 -ACP Modem (Mwave) support
  4.4037 -CONFIG_MWAVE
  4.4038 -  The ACP modem (Mwave) for Linux is a WinModem. It is composed of a
  4.4039 -  kernel driver and a user level application. Together these components
  4.4040 -  support direct attachment to public switched telephone networks (PSTNs)
  4.4041 -  and support selected world wide countries.
  4.4042 -
  4.4043 -  This version of the ACP Modem driver supports the IBM Thinkpad 600E,
  4.4044 -  600, and 770 that include on board ACP modem hardware.
  4.4045 -
  4.4046 -  The modem also supports the standard communications port interface
  4.4047 -  (ttySx) and is compatible with the Hayes AT Command Set.
  4.4048 -
  4.4049 -  The user level application needed to use this driver can be found at
  4.4050 -  the IBM Linux Technology Center (LTC) web site:
  4.4051 -  <http://www.ibm.com/linux/ltc/>.
  4.4052 -
  4.4053 -  If you own one of the above IBM Thinkpads which has the Mwave chipset
  4.4054 -  in it, say Y.
  4.4055 -
  4.4056 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4057 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4058 -  The module will be called mwave.o. If you want to compile it as
  4.4059 -  a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt.
  4.4060 -
  4.4061 -/dev/agpgart (AGP Support)
  4.4062 -CONFIG_AGP
  4.4063 -  AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) is a bus system mainly used to
  4.4064 -  connect graphics cards to the rest of the system.
  4.4065 -
  4.4066 -  If you have an AGP system and you say Y here, it will be possible to
  4.4067 -  use the AGP features of your 3D rendering video card. This code acts
  4.4068 -  as a sort of "AGP driver" for the motherboard's chipset.
  4.4069 -
  4.4070 -  If you need more texture memory than you can get with the AGP GART
  4.4071 -  (theoretically up to 256 MB, but in practice usually 64 or 128 MB
  4.4072 -  due to kernel allocation issues), you could use PCI accesses
  4.4073 -  and have up to a couple gigs of texture space.
  4.4074 -
  4.4075 -  Note that this is the only means to have XFree4/GLX use
  4.4076 -  write-combining with MTRR support on the AGP bus. Without it, OpenGL
  4.4077 -  direct rendering will be a lot slower but still faster than PIO.
  4.4078 -
  4.4079 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4080 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4081 -
  4.4082 -  This driver is available as a module.  If you want to compile it as
  4.4083 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The
  4.4084 -  module will be called agpgart.o.
  4.4085 -
  4.4086 -Intel 440LX/BX/GX/815/820/830/840/845/850/860 support
  4.4087 -CONFIG_AGP_INTEL
  4.4088 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
  4.4089 -  XFree86 4.x on Intel 440LX/BX/GX, 815, 820, 830, 840, 845, 850 and 860 chipsets.
  4.4090 -
  4.4091 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4092 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4093 -
  4.4094 -Intel 460GX support
  4.4095 -CONFIG_AGP_I460
  4.4096 -  This option gives you AGP support for the Intel 460GX chipset.  This
  4.4097 -  chipset, the first to support Intel Itanium processors, is new and
  4.4098 -  this option is correspondingly a little experimental.
  4.4099 -
  4.4100 -  If you don't have a 460GX based machine (such as BigSur) with an AGP 
  4.4101 -  slot then this option isn't going to do you much good.  If you're
  4.4102 -  dying to do Direct Rendering on IA-64, this is what you're looking for.
  4.4103 -
  4.4104 -Intel I810/I815 DC100/I810e support
  4.4105 -CONFIG_AGP_I810
  4.4106 -  This option gives you AGP support for the Xserver on the Intel 810
  4.4107 -  815 and 830m chipset boards for their on-board integrated graphics. This
  4.4108 -  is required to do any useful video modes with these boards.
  4.4109 -
  4.4110 -VIA chipset support
  4.4111 -CONFIG_AGP_VIA
  4.4112 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
  4.4113 -  XFree86 4.x on VIA MPV3/Apollo Pro chipsets.
  4.4114 -
  4.4115 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4116 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4117 -
  4.4118 -AMD Irongate, 761, and 762 support
  4.4119 -CONFIG_AGP_AMD
  4.4120 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
  4.4121 -  XFree86 4.x on AMD Irongate, 761, and 762 chipsets.
  4.4122 -
  4.4123 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4124 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4125 -
  4.4126 -CONFIG_AGP_AMD_K8
  4.4127 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of
  4.4128 -  XFree86 on an AMD Opteron/Athlon64 using the on-CPU GART.
  4.4129 -
  4.4130 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4131 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4132 -
  4.4133 -Generic SiS support
  4.4134 -CONFIG_AGP_SIS
  4.4135 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of
  4.4136 -  XFree86 4.x on Silicon Integrated Systems [SiS] chipsets.
  4.4137 -
  4.4138 -  Note that 5591/5592 AGP chipsets are NOT specifically supported;
  4.4139 -  However, the driver works well on these, too.
  4.4140 -
  4.4141 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4142 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4143 -
  4.4144 -Serverworks LE/HE support
  4.4145 -CONFIG_AGP_SWORKS
  4.4146 -  Say Y here to support the Serverworks AGP card.  See
  4.4147 -  <http://www.serverworks.com/> for product descriptions and images.
  4.4148 -
  4.4149 -NVIDIA chipset support
  4.4150 -CONFIG_AGP_NVIDIA
  4.4151 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
  4.4152 -  XFree86 4.x on NVIDIA nForce/nForce2 chipsets.
  4.4153 -
  4.4154 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4155 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4156 -
  4.4157 -ALI chipset support
  4.4158 -CONFIG_AGP_ALI
  4.4159 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of the
  4.4160 -  XFree86 4.x on the following ALi chipsets.  The supported chipsets
  4.4161 -  include M1541, M1621, M1631, M1632, M1641,M1647,and M1651.
  4.4162 -  For the ALi-chipset question, ALi suggests you refer to
  4.4163 -  <http://www.ali.com.tw/eng/support/index.shtml>.
  4.4164 -
  4.4165 -  The M1541 chipset can do AGP 1x and 2x, but note that there is an
  4.4166 -  acknowledged incompatibility with Matrox G200 cards. Due to
  4.4167 -  timing issues, this chipset cannot do AGP 2x with the G200.
  4.4168 -  This is a hardware limitation. AGP 1x seems to be fine, though.
  4.4169 -
  4.4170 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4171 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4172 -
  4.4173 -CONFIG_AGP_HP_ZX1
  4.4174 -  This option gives you AGP GART support for the HP ZX1 chipset
  4.4175 -  for IA64 processors.
  4.4176 -
  4.4177 -CONFIG_AGP_ATI
  4.4178 -  This option gives you AGP support for the GLX component of
  4.4179 -  XFree86 4.x on the ATI RadeonIGP family of chipsets.
  4.4180 -
  4.4181 -  You should say Y here if you use XFree86 3.3.6 or 4.x and want to
  4.4182 -  use GLX or DRI.  If unsure, say N.
  4.4183 -
  4.4184 -Support for ISA-bus hardware
  4.4185 -CONFIG_ISA
  4.4186 -  Find out whether you have ISA slots on your motherboard.  ISA is the
  4.4187 -  name of a bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff
  4.4188 -  inside your box.  Other bus systems are PCI, EISA, MicroChannel
  4.4189 -  (MCA) or VESA.  ISA is an older system, now being displaced by PCI;
  4.4190 -  newer boards don't support it.  If you have ISA, say Y, otherwise N.
  4.4191 -
  4.4192 -Support for PCI bus hardware
  4.4193 -CONFIG_PCI
  4.4194 -  Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
  4.4195 -  bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
  4.4196 -  your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
  4.4197 -  VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
  4.4198 -
  4.4199 -  The PCI-HOWTO, available from
  4.4200 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
  4.4201 -  information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
  4.4202 -  doesn't.
  4.4203 -
  4.4204 -PCI support
  4.4205 -CONFIG_PCI_INTEGRATOR
  4.4206 -  Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
  4.4207 -  bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
  4.4208 -  your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
  4.4209 -  VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
  4.4210 -
  4.4211 -  The PCI-HOWTO, available from
  4.4212 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
  4.4213 -  information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
  4.4214 -  doesn't.
  4.4215 -
  4.4216 -QSpan PCI
  4.4217 -CONFIG_PCI_QSPAN
  4.4218 -  Find out whether you have a PCI motherboard. PCI is the name of a
  4.4219 -  bus system, i.e. the way the CPU talks to the other stuff inside
  4.4220 -  your box. Other bus systems are ISA, EISA, MicroChannel (MCA) or
  4.4221 -  VESA. If you have PCI, say Y, otherwise N.
  4.4222 -
  4.4223 -  The PCI-HOWTO, available from
  4.4224 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
  4.4225 -  information about which PCI hardware does work under Linux and which
  4.4226 -  doesn't.
  4.4227 -
  4.4228 -# Choice: pci_access
  4.4229 -PCI access mode
  4.4230 -CONFIG_PCI_GOBIOS
  4.4231 -  On PCI systems, the BIOS can be used to detect the PCI devices and
  4.4232 -  determine their configuration. However, some old PCI motherboards
  4.4233 -  have BIOS bugs and may crash if this is done. Also, some embedded
  4.4234 -  PCI-based systems don't have any BIOS at all. Linux can also try to
  4.4235 -  detect the PCI hardware directly without using the BIOS.
  4.4236 -
  4.4237 -  With this option, you can specify how Linux should detect the PCI
  4.4238 -  devices. If you choose "BIOS", the BIOS will be used, if you choose
  4.4239 -  "Direct", the BIOS won't be used, and if you choose "Any", the
  4.4240 -  kernel will try the direct access method and falls back to the BIOS
  4.4241 -  if that doesn't work. If unsure, go with the default, which is
  4.4242 -  "Any".
  4.4243 -
  4.4244 -PCI device name database
  4.4245 -CONFIG_PCI_NAMES
  4.4246 -  By default, the kernel contains a database of all known PCI device
  4.4247 -  names to make the information in /proc/pci, /proc/ioports and
  4.4248 -  similar files comprehensible to the user. This database increases
  4.4249 -  size of the kernel image by about 80KB, but it gets freed after the
  4.4250 -  system boots up, so it doesn't take up kernel memory. Anyway, if you
  4.4251 -  are building an installation floppy or kernel for an embedded system
  4.4252 -  where kernel image size really matters, you can disable this feature
  4.4253 -  and you'll get device ID numbers instead of names.
  4.4254 -
  4.4255 -  When in doubt, say Y.
  4.4256 -
  4.4257 -Generic PCI hotplug support
  4.4258 -CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI
  4.4259 -  Say Y here if you have a motherboard with a PCI Hotplug controller.
  4.4260 -  This allows you to add and remove PCI cards while the machine is
  4.4261 -  powered up and running.  The file system pcihpfs must be mounted
  4.4262 -  in order to interact with any PCI Hotplug controllers.
  4.4263 -
  4.4264 -  This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4265 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4266 -  The module will be called pci_hotplug.o. If you want to compile it
  4.4267 -  as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4268 -
  4.4269 -  When in doubt, say N.
  4.4270 -
  4.4271 -Compaq PCI Hotplug driver
  4.4272 -CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_COMPAQ
  4.4273 -  Say Y here if you have a motherboard with a Compaq PCI Hotplug
  4.4274 -  controller.
  4.4275 -
  4.4276 -  This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4277 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4278 -  The module will be called cpqphp.o. If you want to compile it
  4.4279 -  as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4280 -
  4.4281 -  When in doubt, say N.
  4.4282 -
  4.4283 -PCI Compaq Hotplug controller NVRAM support
  4.4284 -CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_COMPAQ_NVRAM
  4.4285 -  Say Y here if you have a Compaq server that has a PCI Hotplug
  4.4286 -  controller.  This will allow the PCI Hotplug driver to store the PCI
  4.4287 -  system configuration options in NVRAM.
  4.4288 -
  4.4289 -  When in doubt, say N.
  4.4290 -
  4.4291 -ACPI PCI Hotplug driver
  4.4292 -CONFIG_HOTPLUG_PCI_ACPI
  4.4293 -  Say Y here if you have a system that supports PCI Hotplug using
  4.4294 -  ACPI.
  4.4295 -
  4.4296 -  This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4297 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4298 -  The module will be called acpiphp.o. If you want to compile it
  4.4299 -  as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4300 -
  4.4301 -MCA support
  4.4302 -CONFIG_MCA
  4.4303 -  MicroChannel Architecture is found in some IBM PS/2 machines and
  4.4304 -  laptops.  It is a bus system similar to PCI or ISA. See
  4.4305 -  <file:Documentation/mca.txt> (and especially the web page given
  4.4306 -  there) before attempting to build an MCA bus kernel.
  4.4307 -
  4.4308 -Support for EISA-bus hardware
  4.4309 -CONFIG_EISA
  4.4310 -  The Extended Industry Standard Architecture (EISA) bus was
  4.4311 -  developed as an open alternative to the IBM MicroChannel bus.
  4.4312 -
  4.4313 -  The EISA bus provided some of the features of the IBM MicroChannel
  4.4314 -  bus while maintaining backward compatibility with cards made for
  4.4315 -  the older ISA bus.  The EISA bus saw limited use between 1988 and
  4.4316 -  1995 when it was made obsolete by the PCI bus.
  4.4317 -
  4.4318 -  Say Y here if you are building a kernel for an EISA-based machine.
  4.4319 -
  4.4320 -  Otherwise, say N.
  4.4321 -
  4.4322 -SGI Visual Workstation support
  4.4323 -CONFIG_VISWS
  4.4324 -  The SGI Visual Workstation series is an IA32-based workstation
  4.4325 -  based on SGI systems chips with some legacy PC hardware attached.
  4.4326 -  Say Y here to create a kernel to run on the SGI 320 or 540.
  4.4327 -  A kernel compiled for the Visual Workstation will not run on other
  4.4328 -  PC boards and vice versa.
  4.4329 -  See <file:Documentation/sgi-visws.txt> for more.
  4.4330 -
  4.4331 -SGI Visual Workstation framebuffer support
  4.4332 -CONFIG_FB_SGIVW
  4.4333 -  SGI Visual Workstation support for framebuffer graphics.
  4.4334 -
  4.4335 -I2O support
  4.4336 -CONFIG_I2O
  4.4337 -  The Intelligent Input/Output (I2O) architecture allows hardware
  4.4338 -  drivers to be split into two parts: an operating system specific
  4.4339 -  module called the OSM and an hardware specific module called the
  4.4340 -  HDM. The OSM can talk to a whole range of HDM's, and ideally the
  4.4341 -  HDM's are not OS dependent. This allows for the same HDM driver to
  4.4342 -  be used under different operating systems if the relevant OSM is in
  4.4343 -  place. In order for this to work, you need to have an I2O interface
  4.4344 -  adapter card in your computer. This card contains a special I/O
  4.4345 -  processor (IOP), thus allowing high speeds since the CPU does not
  4.4346 -  have to deal with I/O.
  4.4347 -
  4.4348 -  If you say Y here, you will get a choice of interface adapter
  4.4349 -  drivers and OSM's with the following questions.
  4.4350 -
  4.4351 -  This support is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4352 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4353 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.4354 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  You will get modules called
  4.4355 -  i2o_core.o and i2o_config.o.
  4.4356 -
  4.4357 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.4358 -
  4.4359 -I2O PCI support
  4.4360 -CONFIG_I2O_PCI
  4.4361 -  Say Y for support of PCI bus I2O interface adapters. Currently this
  4.4362 -  is the only variety supported, so you should say Y.
  4.4363 -
  4.4364 -  This support is also available as a module called i2o_pci.o ( = code
  4.4365 -  which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.4366 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.4367 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4368 -
  4.4369 -I2O Block OSM
  4.4370 -CONFIG_I2O_BLOCK
  4.4371 -  Include support for the I2O Block OSM. The Block OSM presents disk
  4.4372 -  and other structured block devices to the operating system.
  4.4373 -
  4.4374 -  This support is also available as a module called i2o_block.o ( =
  4.4375 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.4376 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.4377 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4378 -
  4.4379 -I2O LAN OSM
  4.4380 -CONFIG_I2O_LAN
  4.4381 -  Include support for the LAN OSM. You will also need to include
  4.4382 -  support for token ring or FDDI if you wish to use token ring or FDDI
  4.4383 -  I2O cards with this driver.
  4.4384 -
  4.4385 -  This support is also available as a module called i2o_lan.o ( = code
  4.4386 -  which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.4387 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.4388 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4389 -
  4.4390 -I2O SCSI OSM
  4.4391 -CONFIG_I2O_SCSI
  4.4392 -  Allows direct SCSI access to SCSI devices on a SCSI or FibreChannel
  4.4393 -  I2O controller. You can use both the SCSI and Block OSM together if
  4.4394 -  you wish.
  4.4395 -
  4.4396 -  This support is also available as a module called i2o_scsi.o ( =
  4.4397 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.4398 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.4399 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4400 -
  4.4401 -I2O /proc support
  4.4402 -CONFIG_I2O_PROC
  4.4403 -  If you say Y here and to "/proc file system support", you will be
  4.4404 -  able to read I2O related information from the virtual directory
  4.4405 -  /proc/i2o.
  4.4406 -
  4.4407 -  This support is also available as a module called i2o_proc.o ( =
  4.4408 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.4409 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.4410 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4411 -
  4.4412 -Plug and Play support
  4.4413 -CONFIG_PNP
  4.4414 -  Plug and Play (PnP) is a standard for peripherals which allows those
  4.4415 -  peripherals to be configured by software, e.g. assign IRQ's or other
  4.4416 -  parameters. No jumpers on the cards are needed, instead the values
  4.4417 -  are provided to the cards from the BIOS, from the operating system,
  4.4418 -  or using a user-space utility.
  4.4419 -
  4.4420 -  Say Y here if you would like Linux to configure your Plug and Play
  4.4421 -  devices. You should then also say Y to "ISA Plug and Play support",
  4.4422 -  below. Alternatively, you can say N here and configure your PnP
  4.4423 -  devices using the user space utilities contained in the isapnptools
  4.4424 -  package.
  4.4425 -
  4.4426 -  This support is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4427 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4428 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.4429 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4430 -
  4.4431 -ISA Plug and Play support
  4.4432 -CONFIG_ISAPNP
  4.4433 -  Say Y here if you would like support for ISA Plug and Play devices.
  4.4434 -  Some information is in <file:Documentation/isapnp.txt>.
  4.4435 -
  4.4436 -  This support is also available as a module called isapnp.o ( =
  4.4437 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.4438 -  whenever you want). If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.4439 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4440 -
  4.4441 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.4442 -
  4.4443 -PNPBIOS support
  4.4444 -CONFIG_PNPBIOS
  4.4445 -  Linux uses the PNPBIOS as defined in "Plug and Play BIOS
  4.4446 -  Specification Version 1.0A May 5, 1994" to autodetect built-in
  4.4447 -  mainboard resources (e.g. parallel port resources).
  4.4448 -
  4.4449 -  Other features (e.g. change resources, ESCD, event notification,
  4.4450 -  Docking station information, ISAPNP services) are not used.
  4.4451 -
  4.4452 -  Note: ACPI is expected to supersede PNPBIOS some day, currently it
  4.4453 -  co-exists nicely.
  4.4454 -
  4.4455 -  See latest pcmcia-cs (stand-alone package) for a nice "lspnp" tools,
  4.4456 -  or have a look at /proc/bus/pnp.
  4.4457 -
  4.4458 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.4459 -
  4.4460 -Support for hot-pluggable devices
  4.4461 -CONFIG_HOTPLUG
  4.4462 -  Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while
  4.4463 -  the system is running, and be able to use them quickly.  In many
  4.4464 -  cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.
  4.4465 -
  4.4466 -  One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card
  4.4467 -  size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are
  4.4468 -  plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers.  Another
  4.4469 -  example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.
  4.4470 -
  4.4471 -  Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel.  Get agent
  4.4472 -  software (at <http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/>) and install it.
  4.4473 -  Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy
  4.4474 -  agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed
  4.4475 -  to use devices as you hotplug them.
  4.4476 -
  4.4477 -PCMCIA/CardBus support
  4.4478 -CONFIG_PCMCIA
  4.4479 -  Say Y here if you want to attach PCMCIA- or PC-cards to your Linux
  4.4480 -  computer.  These are credit-card size devices such as network cards,
  4.4481 -  modems or hard drives often used with laptops computers.  There are
  4.4482 -  actually two varieties of these cards: the older 16 bit PCMCIA cards
  4.4483 -  and the newer 32 bit CardBus cards.  If you want to use CardBus
  4.4484 -  cards, you need to say Y here and also to "CardBus support" below.
  4.4485 -
  4.4486 -  To use your PC-cards, you will need supporting software from David
  4.4487 -  Hinds' pcmcia-cs package (see the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
  4.4488 -  for location).  Please also read the PCMCIA-HOWTO, available from
  4.4489 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.4490 -
  4.4491 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4492 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4493 -  When compiled this way, there will be modules called pcmcia_core.o
  4.4494 -  and ds.o.  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and
  4.4495 -  read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4496 -
  4.4497 -CardBus card and (Yenta) bridge support
  4.4498 -CONFIG_CARDBUS
  4.4499 -  CardBus is a bus mastering architecture for PC-cards, which allows
  4.4500 -  for 32 bit PC-cards (the original PCMCIA standard specifies only
  4.4501 -  a 16 bit wide bus). Many newer PC-cards are actually CardBus cards.
  4.4502 -
  4.4503 -  This option enables support for CardBus PC Cards, as well as support
  4.4504 -  for CardBus host bridges.  Virtually all modern PCMCIA bridges are
  4.4505 -  CardBus compatible.  A "bridge" is the hardware inside your computer
  4.4506 -  that PCMCIA cards are plugged into.
  4.4507 -
  4.4508 -  To use your PC-cards, you will need supporting software from David
  4.4509 -  Hinds' pcmcia-cs package (see the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
  4.4510 -  for location).
  4.4511 -
  4.4512 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.4513 -
  4.4514 -i82092 compatible bridge support
  4.4515 -CONFIG_I82092
  4.4516 -  This provides support for the Intel I82092AA PCI-to-PCMCIA bridge device,
  4.4517 -  found in some older laptops and more commonly in evaluation boards for the
  4.4518 -  chip.
  4.4519 -
  4.4520 -i82365 compatible host bridge support
  4.4521 -CONFIG_I82365
  4.4522 -  Say Y here to include support for ISA-bus PCMCIA host bridges that
  4.4523 -  are register compatible with the Intel i82365.  These are found on
  4.4524 -  older laptops and ISA-bus card readers for desktop systems.  A
  4.4525 -  "bridge" is the hardware inside your computer that PCMCIA cards are
  4.4526 -  plugged into. If unsure, say N.
  4.4527 -
  4.4528 -Databook TCIC host bridge support
  4.4529 -CONFIG_TCIC
  4.4530 -  Say Y here to include support for the Databook TCIC family of PCMCIA
  4.4531 -  host bridges. These are only found on a handful of old systems.
  4.4532 -  "Bridge" is the name used for the hardware inside your computer that
  4.4533 -  PCMCIA cards are plugged into. If unsure, say N.
  4.4534 -
  4.4535 -CONFIG_PCMCIA_SIBYTE
  4.4536 -  Say Y here to include support for the SiByte SOC's built-in PCMCIA
  4.4537 -  interface.  Only ATA cards and CompactFlash are currently
  4.4538 -  supported.
  4.4539 -
  4.4540 -System V IPC
  4.4541 -CONFIG_SYSVIPC
  4.4542 -  Inter Process Communication is a suite of library functions and
  4.4543 -  system calls which let processes (running programs) synchronize and
  4.4544 -  exchange information. It is generally considered to be a good thing,
  4.4545 -  and some programs won't run unless you say Y here. In particular, if
  4.4546 -  you want to run the DOS emulator dosemu under Linux (read the
  4.4547 -  DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from
  4.4548 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>), you'll need to say Y
  4.4549 -  here.
  4.4550 -
  4.4551 -  You can find documentation about IPC with "info ipc" and also in
  4.4552 -  section 6.4 of the Linux Programmer's Guide, available from
  4.4553 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#guide>.
  4.4554 -
  4.4555 -BSD Process Accounting
  4.4556 -CONFIG_BSD_PROCESS_ACCT
  4.4557 -  If you say Y here, a user level program will be able to instruct the
  4.4558 -  kernel (via a special system call) to write process accounting
  4.4559 -  information to a file: whenever a process exits, information about
  4.4560 -  that process will be appended to the file by the kernel.  The
  4.4561 -  information includes things such as creation time, owning user,
  4.4562 -  command name, memory usage, controlling terminal etc. (the complete
  4.4563 -  list is in the struct acct in <file:include/linux/acct.h>).  It is
  4.4564 -  up to the user level program to do useful things with this
  4.4565 -  information.  This is generally a good idea, so say Y.
  4.4566 -
  4.4567 -Sysctl support
  4.4568 -CONFIG_SYSCTL
  4.4569 -  The sysctl interface provides a means of dynamically changing
  4.4570 -  certain kernel parameters and variables on the fly without requiring
  4.4571 -  a recompile of the kernel or reboot of the system.  The primary
  4.4572 -  interface consists of a system call, but if you say Y to "/proc
  4.4573 -  file system support", a tree of modifiable sysctl entries will be
  4.4574 -  generated beneath the /proc/sys directory. They are explained in the
  4.4575 -  files in <file:Documentation/sysctl/>.  Note that enabling this
  4.4576 -  option will enlarge the kernel by at least 8 KB.
  4.4577 -
  4.4578 -  As it is generally a good thing, you should say Y here unless
  4.4579 -  building a kernel for install/rescue disks or your system is very
  4.4580 -  limited in memory.
  4.4581 -
  4.4582 -# Choice: kcore
  4.4583 -Kernel core (/proc/kcore) format
  4.4584 -CONFIG_KCORE_ELF
  4.4585 -  If you enabled support for /proc file system then the file
  4.4586 -  /proc/kcore will contain the kernel core image. This can be used
  4.4587 -  in gdb:
  4.4588 -
  4.4589 -  $ cd /usr/src/linux ; gdb vmlinux /proc/kcore
  4.4590 -
  4.4591 -  You have two choices here: ELF and A.OUT. Selecting ELF will make
  4.4592 -  /proc/kcore appear in ELF core format as defined by the Executable
  4.4593 -  and Linking Format specification. Selecting A.OUT will choose the
  4.4594 -  old "a.out" format which may be necessary for some old versions
  4.4595 -  of binutils or on some architectures.
  4.4596 -
  4.4597 -  This is especially useful if you have compiled the kernel with the
  4.4598 -  "-g" option to preserve debugging information. It is mainly used
  4.4599 -  for examining kernel data structures on the live kernel so if you
  4.4600 -  don't understand what this means or are not a kernel hacker, just
  4.4601 -  leave it at its default value ELF.
  4.4602 -
  4.4603 -Select a.out format for /proc/kcore
  4.4604 -CONFIG_KCORE_AOUT
  4.4605 -  Not necessary unless you're using a very out-of-date binutils
  4.4606 -  version.  You probably want KCORE_ELF.
  4.4607 -
  4.4608 -Kernel support for ELF binaries
  4.4609 -CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF
  4.4610 -  ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and
  4.4611 -  executables used across different architectures and operating
  4.4612 -  systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries
  4.4613 -  and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all
  4.4614 -  but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC)
  4.4615 -  because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able
  4.4616 -  to run executables from different architectures or operating systems
  4.4617 -  however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new
  4.4618 -  executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely
  4.4619 -  want to say Y here.
  4.4620 -
  4.4621 -  Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from
  4.4622 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.4623 -
  4.4624 -  If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y
  4.4625 -  here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then
  4.4626 -  you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including
  4.4627 -  ld.so (check the file <file:Documentation/Changes> for location and
  4.4628 -  latest version).
  4.4629 -
  4.4630 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4631 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.4632 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.4633 -  will be called binfmt_elf.o. Saying M or N here is dangerous because
  4.4634 -  some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.
  4.4635 -
  4.4636 -Kernel support for a.out binaries
  4.4637 -CONFIG_BINFMT_AOUT
  4.4638 -  A.out (Assembler.OUTput) is a set of formats for libraries and
  4.4639 -  executables used in the earliest versions of UNIX. Linux used the
  4.4640 -  a.out formats QMAGIC and ZMAGIC until they were replaced with the
  4.4641 -  ELF format.
  4.4642 -
  4.4643 -  As more and more programs are converted to ELF, the use for a.out
  4.4644 -  will gradually diminish. If you disable this option it will reduce
  4.4645 -  your kernel by one page. This is not much and by itself does not
  4.4646 -  warrant removing support. However its removal is a good idea if you
  4.4647 -  wish to ensure that absolutely none of your programs will use this
  4.4648 -  older executable format. If you don't know what to answer at this
  4.4649 -  point then answer Y. If someone told you "You need a kernel with
  4.4650 -  QMAGIC support" then you'll have to say Y here. You may answer M to
  4.4651 -  compile a.out support as a module and later load the module when you
  4.4652 -  want to use a program or library in a.out format. The module will be
  4.4653 -  called binfmt_aout.o. Saying M or N here is dangerous though,
  4.4654 -  because some crucial programs on your system might still be in A.OUT
  4.4655 -  format.
  4.4656 -
  4.4657 -OSF/1 v4 readv/writev compatibility
  4.4658 -CONFIG_OSF4_COMPAT
  4.4659 -  Say Y if you are using OSF/1 binaries (like Netscape and Acrobat)
  4.4660 -  with v4 shared libraries freely available from Compaq. If you're
  4.4661 -  going to use shared libraries from Tru64 version 5.0 or later, say N.
  4.4662 -
  4.4663 -Kernel support for Linux/Intel ELF binaries
  4.4664 -CONFIG_BINFMT_EM86
  4.4665 -  Say Y here if you want to be able to execute Linux/Intel ELF
  4.4666 -  binaries just like native Alpha binaries on your Alpha machine. For
  4.4667 -  this to work, you need to have the emulator /usr/bin/em86 in place.
  4.4668 -
  4.4669 -  You can get the same functionality by saying N here and saying Y to
  4.4670 -  "Kernel support for MISC binaries".
  4.4671 -
  4.4672 -  You may answer M to compile the emulation support as a module and
  4.4673 -  later load the module when you want to use a Linux/Intel binary. The
  4.4674 -  module will be called binfmt_em86.o. If unsure, say Y.
  4.4675 -
  4.4676 -Kernel support for SOM binaries
  4.4677 -CONFIG_BINFMT_SOM
  4.4678 -  SOM is a binary executable format inherited from HP/UX.  Say Y here
  4.4679 -  to be able to load and execute SOM binaries directly.
  4.4680 -
  4.4681 -Kernel support for MISC binaries
  4.4682 -CONFIG_BINFMT_MISC
  4.4683 -  If you say Y here, it will be possible to plug wrapper-driven binary
  4.4684 -  formats into the kernel. You will like this especially when you use
  4.4685 -  programs that need an interpreter to run like Java, Python or
  4.4686 -  Emacs-Lisp. It's also useful if you often run DOS executables under
  4.4687 -  the Linux DOS emulator DOSEMU (read the DOSEMU-HOWTO, available from
  4.4688 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>). Once you have
  4.4689 -  registered such a binary class with the kernel, you can start one of
  4.4690 -  those programs simply by typing in its name at a shell prompt; Linux
  4.4691 -  will automatically feed it to the correct interpreter.
  4.4692 -
  4.4693 -  You can do other nice things, too. Read the file
  4.4694 -  <file:Documentation/binfmt_misc.txt> to learn how to use this
  4.4695 -  feature, and <file:Documentation/java.txt> for information about how
  4.4696 -  to include Java support.
  4.4697 -
  4.4698 -  You must say Y to "/proc file system support" (CONFIG_PROC_FS) to
  4.4699 -  use this part of the kernel.
  4.4700 -
  4.4701 -  You may say M here for module support and later load the module when
  4.4702 -  you have use for it; the module is called binfmt_misc.o. If you
  4.4703 -  don't know what to answer at this point, say Y.
  4.4704 -
  4.4705 -Kernel support for JAVA binaries
  4.4706 -CONFIG_BINFMT_JAVA
  4.4707 -  If you say Y here, the kernel will load and execute Java J-code
  4.4708 -  binaries directly.  Note: this option is obsolete and scheduled for
  4.4709 -  removal, use CONFIG_BINFMT_MISC instead.
  4.4710 -
  4.4711 -Solaris binary emulation
  4.4712 -CONFIG_SOLARIS_EMUL
  4.4713 -  This is experimental code which will enable you to run (many)
  4.4714 -  Solaris binaries on your SPARC Linux machine.
  4.4715 -
  4.4716 -  This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4717 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4718 -  The module will be called solaris.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.4719 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4720 -
  4.4721 -SUN SME environment monitoring
  4.4722 -CONFIG_ENVCTRL
  4.4723 -  Kernel support for temperature and fan monitoring on Sun SME
  4.4724 -  machines.
  4.4725 -
  4.4726 -  This code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4727 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.4728 -  The module will be called envctrl.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.4729 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4730 -
  4.4731 -# Choice: x86type
  4.4732 -Processor family
  4.4733 -CONFIG_M386
  4.4734 -  This is the processor type of your CPU. This information is used for
  4.4735 -  optimizing purposes. In order to compile a kernel that can run on
  4.4736 -  all x86 CPU types (albeit not optimally fast), you can specify
  4.4737 -  "386" here.
  4.4738 -
  4.4739 -  The kernel will not necessarily run on earlier architectures than
  4.4740 -  the one you have chosen, e.g. a Pentium optimized kernel will run on
  4.4741 -  a PPro, but not necessarily on a i486.
  4.4742 -
  4.4743 -  Here are the settings recommended for greatest speed:
  4.4744 -   - "386" for the AMD/Cyrix/Intel 386DX/DXL/SL/SLC/SX, Cyrix/TI
  4.4745 -     486DLC/DLC2, UMC 486SX-S and NexGen Nx586.  Only "386" kernels
  4.4746 -     will run on a 386 class machine.
  4.4747 -   - "486" for the AMD/Cyrix/IBM/Intel 486DX/DX2/DX4 or
  4.4748 -     SL/SLC/SLC2/SLC3/SX/SX2 and UMC U5D or U5S.
  4.4749 -   - "586" for generic Pentium CPUs, possibly lacking the TSC
  4.4750 -     (time stamp counter) register.
  4.4751 -   - "Pentium-Classic" for the Intel Pentium.
  4.4752 -   - "Pentium-MMX" for the Intel Pentium MMX.
  4.4753 -   - "Pentium-Pro" for the Intel Pentium Pro/Celeron/Pentium II.
  4.4754 -   - "Pentium-III" for the Intel Pentium III
  4.4755 -     and Celerons based on the Coppermine core.
  4.4756 -   - "Pentium-4" for the Intel Pentium 4.
  4.4757 -   - "K6" for the AMD K6, K6-II and K6-III (aka K6-3D).
  4.4758 -   - "Athlon" for the AMD K7 family (Athlon/Duron/Thunderbird).
  4.4759 -   - "Elan" for the AMD Elan family (Elan SC400/SC410).
  4.4760 -   - "Crusoe" for the Transmeta Crusoe series.
  4.4761 -   - "Winchip-C6" for original IDT Winchip.
  4.4762 -   - "Winchip-2" for IDT Winchip 2.
  4.4763 -   - "Winchip-2A" for IDT Winchips with 3dNow! capabilities.
  4.4764 -   - "CyrixIII" for VIA Cyrix III or VIA C3.
  4.4765 -   - "VIA C3-2 for VIA C3-2 "Nehemiah" (model 9 and above).
  4.4766 -
  4.4767 -  If you don't know what to do, choose "386".
  4.4768 -
  4.4769 -486
  4.4770 -CONFIG_M486
  4.4771 -  Select this for a x486 processor, ether Intel or one of the
  4.4772 -  compatible processors from AMD, Cyrix, IBM, or Intel.  Includes DX,
  4.4773 -  DX2, and DX4 variants; also SL/SLC/SLC2/SLC3/SX/SX2 and UMC U5D or
  4.4774 -  U5S.
  4.4775 -
  4.4776 -586/K5/5x86/6x86/6x86MX
  4.4777 -CONFIG_M586
  4.4778 -  Select this for an x586 or x686 processor such as the AMD K5, the
  4.4779 -  Intel 5x86 or 6x86, or the Intel 6x86MX.  This choice does not
  4.4780 -  assume the RDTSC instruction.
  4.4781 -
  4.4782 -Pentium Classic
  4.4783 -CONFIG_M586TSC
  4.4784 -  Select this for a Pentium Classic processor with the RDTSC (Read
  4.4785 -  Time Stamp Counter) instruction for benchmarking.
  4.4786 -
  4.4787 -VIA C3-2 (Nehemiah)
  4.4788 -CONFIG_MVIAC3_2
  4.4789 -  Select this for a VIA C3 "Nehemiah". Selecting this enables usage of SSE
  4.4790 -  and tells gcc to treat the CPU as a 686.
  4.4791 -
  4.4792 -  Note, this kernel will not boot on older (pre model 9) C3s.
  4.4793 -
  4.4794 -32-bit PDC
  4.4795 -CONFIG_PDC_NARROW
  4.4796 -  Saying Y here will allow developers with a C180, C200, C240, C360,
  4.4797 -  J200, J210, and/or a J2240 to test 64-bit kernels by providing a
  4.4798 -  wrapper for the 32-bit PDC calls.  Since the machines which require
  4.4799 -  this option do not support over 4G of RAM, this option is targeted
  4.4800 -  for developers of these machines wishing to test changes on both
  4.4801 -  32-bit and 64-bit configurations.
  4.4802 -
  4.4803 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.4804 -
  4.4805 -VGA text console
  4.4806 -CONFIG_VGA_CONSOLE
  4.4807 -  Saying Y here will allow you to use Linux in text mode through a
  4.4808 -  display that complies with the generic VGA standard. Virtually
  4.4809 -  everyone wants that.
  4.4810 -
  4.4811 -  The program SVGATextMode can be used to utilize SVGA video cards to
  4.4812 -  their full potential in text mode. Download it from
  4.4813 -  <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/utils/console/>.
  4.4814 -
  4.4815 -  Say Y.
  4.4816 -
  4.4817 -Distribute interrupts on all CPUs by default
  4.4818 -CONFIG_IRQ_ALL_CPUS
  4.4819 -  This option gives the kernel permission to distribute IRQs across
  4.4820 -  multiple CPUs.  Saying N here will route all IRQs to the first
  4.4821 -  CPU. Generally SMP PowerMacs can answer Y. SMP IBM CHRP boxes or
  4.4822 -  Power3 boxes should say N for now.
  4.4823 -
  4.4824 -Video mode selection support
  4.4825 -CONFIG_VIDEO_SELECT
  4.4826 -  This enables support for text mode selection on kernel startup. If
  4.4827 -  you want to take advantage of some high-resolution text mode your
  4.4828 -  card's BIOS offers, but the traditional Linux utilities like
  4.4829 -  SVGATextMode don't, you can say Y here and set the mode using the
  4.4830 -  "vga=" option from your boot loader (lilo or loadlin) or set
  4.4831 -  "vga=ask" which brings up a video mode menu on kernel startup. (Try
  4.4832 -  "man bootparam" or see the documentation of your boot loader about
  4.4833 -  how to pass options to the kernel.)
  4.4834 -
  4.4835 -  Read the file <file:Documentation/svga.txt> for more information
  4.4836 -  about the Video mode selection support. If unsure, say N.
  4.4837 -
  4.4838 -Support for frame buffer devices
  4.4839 -CONFIG_FB
  4.4840 -  The frame buffer device provides an abstraction for the graphics
  4.4841 -  hardware. It represents the frame buffer of some video hardware and
  4.4842 -  allows application software to access the graphics hardware through
  4.4843 -  a well-defined interface, so the software doesn't need to know
  4.4844 -  anything about the low-level (hardware register) stuff.
  4.4845 -
  4.4846 -  Frame buffer devices work identically across the different
  4.4847 -  architectures supported by Linux and make the implementation of
  4.4848 -  application programs easier and more portable; at this point, an X
  4.4849 -  server exists which uses the frame buffer device exclusively.
  4.4850 -  On several non-X86 architectures, the frame buffer device is the
  4.4851 -  only way to use the graphics hardware.
  4.4852 -
  4.4853 -  The device is accessed through special device nodes, usually located
  4.4854 -  in the /dev directory, i.e. /dev/fb*.
  4.4855 -
  4.4856 -  You need an utility program called fbset to make full use of frame
  4.4857 -  buffer devices. Please read <file:Documentation/fb/framebuffer.txt>
  4.4858 -  and the Framebuffer-HOWTO at
  4.4859 -  <http://www.tahallah.demon.co.uk/programming/prog.html> for more
  4.4860 -  information.
  4.4861 -
  4.4862 -  Say Y here and to the driver for your graphics board below if you
  4.4863 -  are compiling a kernel for a non-x86 architecture.
  4.4864 -
  4.4865 -  If you are compiling for the x86 architecture, you can say Y if you
  4.4866 -  want to play with it, but it is not essential. Please note that
  4.4867 -  running graphical applications that directly touch the hardware
  4.4868 -  (e.g. an accelerated X server) and that are not frame buffer
  4.4869 -  device-aware may cause unexpected results. If unsure, say N.
  4.4870 -
  4.4871 -Acorn VIDC support
  4.4872 -CONFIG_FB_ACORN
  4.4873 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the Acorn VIDC graphics
  4.4874 -  hardware found in Acorn RISC PCs and other ARM-based machines.  If
  4.4875 -  unsure, say N.
  4.4876 -
  4.4877 -Permedia2 support
  4.4878 -CONFIG_FB_PM2
  4.4879 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the Permedia2 AGP frame
  4.4880 -  buffer card from ASK, aka `Graphic Blaster Exxtreme'.  There is a
  4.4881 -  product page at
  4.4882 -  <http://www.ask.com.hk/product/Permedia%202/permedia2.htm>.
  4.4883 -
  4.4884 -Enable FIFO disconnect feature
  4.4885 -CONFIG_FB_PM2_FIFO_DISCONNECT
  4.4886 -  Support the Permedia2 FIFOI disconnect feature (see CONFIG_FB_PM2).
  4.4887 -
  4.4888 -Generic Permedia2 PCI board support
  4.4889 -CONFIG_FB_PM2_PCI
  4.4890 -  Say Y to enable support for Permedia2 AGP frame buffer card from
  4.4891 -  3Dlabs (aka `Graphic Blaster Exxtreme') on the PCI bus.
  4.4892 -
  4.4893 -Phase5 CVisionPPC/BVisionPPC support
  4.4894 -CONFIG_FB_PM2_CVPPC
  4.4895 -  Say Y to enable support for the Amiga Phase 5 CVisionPPC BVisionPPC
  4.4896 -  framebuffer cards.  Phase 5 is no longer with us, alas.
  4.4897 -
  4.4898 -Amiga native chipset support
  4.4899 -CONFIG_FB_AMIGA
  4.4900 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the builtin graphics
  4.4901 -  chipset found in Amigas.
  4.4902 -
  4.4903 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.4904 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.4905 -  module will be called amifb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.4906 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.4907 -
  4.4908 -Amiga OCS chipset support
  4.4909 -CONFIG_FB_AMIGA_OCS
  4.4910 -  This enables support for the original Agnus and Denise video chips,
  4.4911 -  found in the Amiga 1000 and most A500's and A2000's. If you intend
  4.4912 -  to run Linux on any of these systems, say Y; otherwise say N.
  4.4913 -
  4.4914 -Amiga ECS chipset support
  4.4915 -CONFIG_FB_AMIGA_ECS
  4.4916 -  This enables support for the Enhanced Chip Set, found in later
  4.4917 -  A500's, later A2000's, the A600, the A3000, the A3000T and CDTV. If
  4.4918 -  you intend to run Linux on any of these systems, say Y; otherwise
  4.4919 -  say N.
  4.4920 -
  4.4921 -Amiga AGA chipset support
  4.4922 -CONFIG_FB_AMIGA_AGA
  4.4923 -  This enables support for the Advanced Graphics Architecture (also
  4.4924 -  known as the AGA or AA) Chip Set, found in the A1200, A4000, A4000T
  4.4925 -  and CD32. If you intend to run Linux on any of these systems, say Y;
  4.4926 -  otherwise say N.
  4.4927 -
  4.4928 -Amiga CyberVision support
  4.4929 -CONFIG_FB_CYBER
  4.4930 -  This enables support for the Cybervision 64 graphics card from
  4.4931 -  Phase5. Please note that its use is not all that intuitive (i.e. if
  4.4932 -  you have any questions, be sure to ask!). Say N unless you have a
  4.4933 -  Cybervision 64 or plan to get one before you next recompile the
  4.4934 -  kernel. Please note that this driver DOES NOT support the
  4.4935 -  Cybervision 64 3D card, as they use incompatible video chips.
  4.4936 -
  4.4937 -CyberPro 20x0 support
  4.4938 -CONFIG_FB_CYBER2000
  4.4939 -  This enables support for the Integraphics CyberPro 20x0 and 5000
  4.4940 -  VGA chips used in the Rebel.com Netwinder and other machines.
  4.4941 -  Say Y if you have a NetWinder or a graphics card containing this
  4.4942 -  device, otherwise say N.
  4.4943 -
  4.4944 -Amiga CyberVision3D support
  4.4945 -CONFIG_FB_VIRGE
  4.4946 -  This enables support for the Cybervision 64/3D graphics card from
  4.4947 -  Phase5. Please note that its use is not all that intuitive (i.e. if
  4.4948 -  you have any questions, be sure to ask!). Say N unless you have a
  4.4949 -  Cybervision 64/3D or plan to get one before you next recompile the
  4.4950 -  kernel. Please note that this driver DOES NOT support the older
  4.4951 -  Cybervision 64 card, as they use incompatible video chips.
  4.4952 -
  4.4953 -Amiga RetinaZ3 support
  4.4954 -CONFIG_FB_RETINAZ3
  4.4955 -  This enables support for the Retina Z3 graphics card. Say N unless
  4.4956 -  you have a Retina Z3 or plan to get one before you next recompile
  4.4957 -  the kernel.
  4.4958 -
  4.4959 -Cirrus Logic generic driver
  4.4960 -CONFIG_FB_CLGEN
  4.4961 -  This enables support for Cirrus Logic GD542x/543x based boards on
  4.4962 -  Amiga: SD64, Piccolo, Picasso II/II+, Picasso IV, or EGS Spectrum.
  4.4963 -
  4.4964 -  If you have a PCI-based system, this enables support for these
  4.4965 -  chips: GD-543x, GD-544x, GD-5480.
  4.4966 -
  4.4967 -  Please read the file <file:Documentation/fb/clgenfb.txt>.
  4.4968 -
  4.4969 -  Say N unless you have such a graphics board or plan to get one
  4.4970 -  before you next recompile the kernel.
  4.4971 -
  4.4972 -Apollo support
  4.4973 -CONFIG_APOLLO
  4.4974 -  Say Y here if you want to run Linux on an MC680x0-based Apollo
  4.4975 -  Domain workstation such as the DN3500.
  4.4976 -
  4.4977 -Apollo 3c505 "EtherLink Plus" support
  4.4978 -CONFIG_APOLLO_ELPLUS
  4.4979 -  Say Y or M here if your Apollo has a 3Com 3c505 ISA Ethernet card.
  4.4980 -  If you don't have one made for Apollos, you can use one from a PC,
  4.4981 -  except that your Apollo won't be able to boot from it (because the
  4.4982 -  code in the ROM will be for a PC).
  4.4983 -
  4.4984 -Atari native chipset support
  4.4985 -CONFIG_FB_ATARI
  4.4986 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the builtin graphics
  4.4987 -  chipset found in Ataris.
  4.4988 -
  4.4989 -Amiga FrameMaster II/Rainbow II support
  4.4990 -CONFIG_FB_FM2
  4.4991 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the Amiga FrameMaster
  4.4992 -  card from BSC (exhibited 1992 but not shipped as a CBM product).
  4.4993 -
  4.4994 -Open Firmware frame buffer device support
  4.4995 -CONFIG_FB_OF
  4.4996 -  Say Y if you want support with Open Firmware for your graphics
  4.4997 -  board.
  4.4998 -
  4.4999 -S3 Trio frame buffer device support
  4.5000 -CONFIG_FB_S3TRIO
  4.5001 -  If you have a S3 Trio say Y. Say N for S3 Virge.
  4.5002 -
  4.5003 -3Dfx Banshee/Voodoo3 display support
  4.5004 -CONFIG_FB_3DFX
  4.5005 -  This driver supports graphics boards with the 3Dfx Banshee/Voodoo3
  4.5006 -  chips. Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
  4.5007 -
  4.5008 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5009 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5010 -  module will be called tdfxfb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.5011 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5012 -
  4.5013 -nVidia Riva support
  4.5014 -CONFIG_FB_RIVA
  4.5015 -  This driver supports graphics boards with the nVidia Riva/Geforce
  4.5016 -  chips.
  4.5017 -  Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
  4.5018 -
  4.5019 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5020 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5021 -  module will be called rivafb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.5022 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5023 -
  4.5024 -Trident Blade/Image support
  4.5025 -CONFIG_FB_TRIDENT
  4.5026 -  This driver is supposed to support graphics boards with the
  4.5027 -  Trident CyberXXXX/Image/CyberBlade chips mostly found in laptops
  4.5028 -  but also on some motherboards.Read <file:Documentation/fb/tridentfb.txt>
  4.5029 -
  4.5030 -  Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
  4.5031 -
  4.5032 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5033 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5034 -  module will be called tridentfb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.5035 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5036 -
  4.5037 -ATI Mach64 display support
  4.5038 -CONFIG_FB_ATY
  4.5039 -  This driver supports graphics boards with the ATI Mach64 chips.
  4.5040 -  Say Y if you have such a graphics board.
  4.5041 -
  4.5042 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5043 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5044 -  module will be called atyfb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.5045 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5046 -
  4.5047 -ATI Rage128 display support
  4.5048 -CONFIG_FB_ATY128
  4.5049 -  This driver supports graphics boards with the ATI Rage128 chips.
  4.5050 -  Say Y if you have such a graphics board and read
  4.5051 -  <file:Documentation/fb/aty128fb.txt>.
  4.5052 -
  4.5053 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5054 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5055 -  module will be called aty128fb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.5056 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5057 -
  4.5058 -Maxine (Personal DECstation) onboard framebuffer support
  4.5059 -CONFIG_FB_MAXINE
  4.5060 -  Support for the onboard framebuffer (1024x768x8) in the Personal
  4.5061 -  DECstation series (Personal DECstation 5000/20, /25, /33, /50,
  4.5062 -  Codename "Maxine").
  4.5063 -
  4.5064 -PMAG-AA TURBOchannel framebuffer support
  4.5065 -CONFIG_FB_PMAG_AA
  4.5066 -  Support for the PMAG-AA TURBOchannel framebuffer card (1280x1024x1)
  4.5067 -  used mainly in the MIPS-based DECstation series.
  4.5068 -
  4.5069 -PMAG-BA TURBOchannel framebuffer support
  4.5070 -CONFIG_FB_PMAG_BA
  4.5071 -  Support for the PMAG-BA TURBOchannel framebuffer card (1024x864x8)
  4.5072 -  used mainly in the MIPS-based DECstation series.
  4.5073 -
  4.5074 -PMAGB-B TURBOchannel framebuffer support
  4.5075 -CONFIG_FB_PMAGB_B
  4.5076 -  Support for the PMAGB-B TURBOchannel framebuffer card used mainly
  4.5077 -  in the MIPS-based DECstation series. The card is currently only 
  4.5078 -  supported in 1280x1024x8 mode.  
  4.5079 -
  4.5080 -FutureTV PCI card
  4.5081 -CONFIG_ARCH_FTVPCI
  4.5082 -  Say Y here if you intend to run this kernel on a FutureTV (nee Nexus
  4.5083 -  Electronics) StrongARM PCI card.
  4.5084 -
  4.5085 -ANAKIN Vehicle Telematics Platform
  4.5086 -CONFIG_ARCH_ANAKIN
  4.5087 -  The Anakin is a StrongArm based SA110 - 2 DIN Vehicle Telematics Platform.
  4.5088 -  64MB SDRAM - 4 Mb Flash - Compact Flash Interface - 1 MB VRAM
  4.5089 -
  4.5090 -  On board peripherals:
  4.5091 -        * Front display: 400x234 16 bit TFT touchscreen
  4.5092 -        * External independent second screen interface
  4.5093 -        * CAN controller SJA1000
  4.5094 -        * USB host controller
  4.5095 -        * 6 channel video codec with hardware overlay
  4.5096 -        * Smartcard reader
  4.5097 -        * IrDa
  4.5098 -
  4.5099 -  Modules interfaced over the Multi Media Extension slots:
  4.5100 -        * A communication card
  4.5101 -                Wavecom GPRS modem
  4.5102 -                uBlock GPS
  4.5103 -                Bosch DAB module
  4.5104 -        * An audio card ( 4 * 40W, AC97 Codec, I2S)
  4.5105 -
  4.5106 -Altera Excalibur XA10 Dev Board
  4.5107 -ARCH_CAMELOT
  4.5108 -  This enables support for Altera's Excalibur XA10 development board.
  4.5109 -  If you would like to build your kernel to run on one of these boards
  4.5110 -  then you must say 'Y' here. Otherwise say 'N'
  4.5111 -
  4.5112 -Link-Up Systems LCD support
  4.5113 -CONFIG_FB_L7200
  4.5114 -  This driver supports the L7200 Color LCD.
  4.5115 -  Say Y if you want graphics support.
  4.5116 -
  4.5117 -NeoMagic display support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.5118 -CONFIG_FB_NEOMAGIC
  4.5119 -  This driver supports notebooks with NeoMagic PCI chips.
  4.5120 -  Say Y if you have such a graphics card. 
  4.5121 -
  4.5122 -  The driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5123 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5124 -  module will be called neofb.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.5125 -  module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt.
  4.5126 -
  4.5127 -PowerMac "control" frame buffer device support
  4.5128 -CONFIG_FB_CONTROL
  4.5129 -  This driver supports a frame buffer for the graphics adapter in the
  4.5130 -  Power Macintosh 7300 and others.
  4.5131 -
  4.5132 -PowerMac "platinum" frame buffer device support
  4.5133 -CONFIG_FB_PLATINUM
  4.5134 -  This driver supports a frame buffer for the "platinum" graphics
  4.5135 -  adapter in some Power Macintoshes.
  4.5136 -
  4.5137 -PowerMac "valkyrie" frame buffer device support
  4.5138 -CONFIG_FB_VALKYRIE
  4.5139 -  This driver supports a frame buffer for the "valkyrie" graphics
  4.5140 -  adapter in some Power Macintoshes.
  4.5141 -
  4.5142 -Chips 65550 display support
  4.5143 -CONFIG_FB_CT65550
  4.5144 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the Chips & Technologies
  4.5145 -  65550 graphics chip in PowerBooks.
  4.5146 -
  4.5147 -TGA frame buffer support
  4.5148 -CONFIG_FB_TGA
  4.5149 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for generic TGA graphic
  4.5150 -  cards. Say Y if you have one of those.
  4.5151 -
  4.5152 -VESA VGA graphics console
  4.5153 -CONFIG_FB_VESA
  4.5154 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for generic VESA 2.0
  4.5155 -  compliant graphic cards. The older VESA 1.2 cards are not supported.
  4.5156 -  You will get a boot time penguin logo at no additional cost. Please
  4.5157 -  read <file:Documentation/fb/vesafb.txt>. If unsure, say Y.
  4.5158 -
  4.5159 -VGA 16-color planar support
  4.5160 -CONFIG_FBCON_VGA_PLANES
  4.5161 -  This low level frame buffer console driver enable the kernel to use
  4.5162 -  the 16-color planar modes of the old VGA cards where the bits of
  4.5163 -  each pixel are separated into 4 planes.
  4.5164 -
  4.5165 -  Only answer Y here if you have a (very old) VGA card that isn't VESA
  4.5166 -  2 compatible.
  4.5167 -
  4.5168 -VGA 16-color graphics console
  4.5169 -CONFIG_FB_VGA16
  4.5170 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for VGA 16 color graphic
  4.5171 -  cards. Say Y if you have such a card.
  4.5172 -
  4.5173 -  This code is also available as a module. If you want to compile it
  4.5174 -  as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the
  4.5175 -  running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read
  4.5176 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.5177 -  vga16fb.o.
  4.5178 -
  4.5179 -Generic STI frame buffer device support
  4.5180 -CONFIG_FB_STI
  4.5181 -  STI refers to the HP "Standard Text Interface" which is a set of
  4.5182 -  BIOS routines contained in a ROM chip in HP PA-RISC based machines.
  4.5183 -  Enabling this option will implement the linux framebuffer device and
  4.5184 -  an fbcon color text console using calls to the STI BIOS routines.
  4.5185 -  The HP framebuffer device is sometimes planar, using a strange memory
  4.5186 -  layout, and changing the plane mask to create colored pixels
  4.5187 -  can require a call to the STI routines, so /dev/fb may not actually 
  4.5188 -  be useful.  However, on some systems packed pixel formats are supported.  
  4.5189 -  It is sufficient for basic text console functions, including fonts.
  4.5190 -
  4.5191 -  You should probably enable this option, unless you are having
  4.5192 -  trouble getting video when booting the kernel (make sure it isn't
  4.5193 -  just that you are running the console on the serial port, though).
  4.5194 -  Really old HP boxes may not have STI, and must use the PDC BIOS
  4.5195 -  console or the IODC BIOS.
  4.5196 -
  4.5197 -Select other compiled-in fonts
  4.5198 -CONFIG_FBCON_FONTS
  4.5199 -  Say Y here if you would like to use fonts other than the default
  4.5200 -  your frame buffer console usually use.
  4.5201 -
  4.5202 -  Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
  4.5203 -  kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
  4.5204 -  the questions about foreign fonts.
  4.5205 -
  4.5206 -  If unsure, say N (the default choices are safe).
  4.5207 -
  4.5208 -VGA 8x16 font
  4.5209 -CONFIG_FONT_8x16
  4.5210 -  This is the "high resolution" font for the VGA frame buffer (the one
  4.5211 -  provided by the VGA text console 80x25 mode.
  4.5212 -
  4.5213 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.5214 -
  4.5215 -Support only 8 pixels wide fonts
  4.5216 -CONFIG_FBCON_FONTWIDTH8_ONLY
  4.5217 -  Answer Y here will make the kernel provide only the 8x8 fonts (these
  4.5218 -  are the less readable).
  4.5219 -
  4.5220 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.5221 -
  4.5222 -Sparc console 8x16 font
  4.5223 -CONFIG_FONT_SUN8x16
  4.5224 -  This is the high resolution console font for Sun machines. Say Y.
  4.5225 -
  4.5226 -Sparc console 12x22 font (not supported by all drivers)
  4.5227 -CONFIG_FONT_SUN12x22
  4.5228 -  This is the high resolution console font for Sun machines with very
  4.5229 -  big letters (like the letters used in the SPARC PROM). If the
  4.5230 -  standard font is unreadable for you, say Y, otherwise say N.
  4.5231 -
  4.5232 -VGA 8x8 font
  4.5233 -CONFIG_FONT_8x8
  4.5234 -  This is the "high resolution" font for the VGA frame buffer (the one
  4.5235 -  provided by the text console 80x50 (and higher) modes).
  4.5236 -
  4.5237 -  Note that this is a poor quality font. The VGA 8x16 font is quite a
  4.5238 -  lot more readable.
  4.5239 -
  4.5240 -  Given the resolution provided by the frame buffer device, answer N
  4.5241 -  here is safe.
  4.5242 -
  4.5243 -Mac console 6x11 font (not supported by all drivers)
  4.5244 -CONFIG_FONT_6x11
  4.5245 -  Small console font with Macintosh-style high-half glyphs.  Some Mac
  4.5246 -  framebuffer drivers don't support this one at all.
  4.5247 -
  4.5248 -Pearl (old m68k) console 8x8 font
  4.5249 -CONFIG_FONT_PEARL_8x8
  4.5250 -  Small console font with PC-style control-character and high-half
  4.5251 -  glyphs.
  4.5252 -
  4.5253 -Acorn console 8x8 font
  4.5254 -CONFIG_FONT_ACORN_8x8
  4.5255 -  Small console font with PC-style control characters and high-half
  4.5256 -  glyphs.
  4.5257 -
  4.5258 -Backward compatibility mode for Xpmac
  4.5259 -CONFIG_FB_COMPAT_XPMAC
  4.5260 -  If you use the Xpmac X server (common with mklinux), you'll need to
  4.5261 -  say Y here to use X. You should consider changing to XFree86 which
  4.5262 -  includes a server that supports the frame buffer device directly
  4.5263 -  (XF68_FBDev).
  4.5264 -
  4.5265 -Hercules (HGA) mono graphics support
  4.5266 -CONFIG_FB_HGA
  4.5267 -  Say Y here if you have a Hercules mono graphics card.
  4.5268 -
  4.5269 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5270 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.5271 -  The module will be called hgafb.o. If you want to compile it as
  4.5272 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5273 -
  4.5274 -  As this card technology is 15 years old, most people will answer N
  4.5275 -  here.
  4.5276 -
  4.5277 -Epson 1355 framebuffer support
  4.5278 -CONFIG_FB_E1355
  4.5279 -  Build in support for the SED1355 Epson Research Embedded RAMDAC
  4.5280 -  LCD/CRT Controller (since redesignated as the S1D13505) as a
  4.5281 -  framebuffer.  Product specs at
  4.5282 -  <http://www.erd.epson.com/vdc/html/products.htm>.
  4.5283 -
  4.5284 -Dreamcast Frame Buffer support
  4.5285 -CONFIG_FB_DC
  4.5286 -  Say Y here to enable support for the framebuffer on the Sega
  4.5287 -  Dreamcast.  This driver is also available as a module, dcfb.o.
  4.5288 -
  4.5289 -Register Base Address
  4.5290 -CONFIG_E1355_REG_BASE
  4.5291 -  Epson SED1355/S1D13505 LCD/CRT controller register base address.
  4.5292 -  See the manuals at
  4.5293 -  <http://www.erd.epson.com/vdc/html/contents/S1D13505.htm> for
  4.5294 -  discussion.
  4.5295 -
  4.5296 -Framebuffer Base Address
  4.5297 -CONFIG_E1355_FB_BASE
  4.5298 -  Epson SED1355/S1D13505 LCD/CRT controller memory base address.  See
  4.5299 -  the manuals at
  4.5300 -  <http://www.erd.epson.com/vdc/html/contents/S1D13505.htm> for
  4.5301 -  discussion.
  4.5302 -
  4.5303 -NEC PowerVR 2 display support
  4.5304 -CONFIG_FB_PVR2
  4.5305 -  Say Y here if you have a PowerVR 2 card in your box.  If you plan to
  4.5306 -  run linux on your Dreamcast, you will have to say Y here.
  4.5307 -  This driver may or may not work on other PowerVR 2 cards, but is
  4.5308 -  totally untested.  Use at your own risk.  If unsure, say N.
  4.5309 -
  4.5310 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5311 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.5312 -  The module will be called pvr2fb.o.  If you want to compile it as
  4.5313 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5314 -
  4.5315 -  You can pass several parameters to the driver at boot time or at
  4.5316 -  module load time.  The parameters look like "video=pvr2:XXX", where
  4.5317 -  the meaning of XXX can be found at the end of the main source file
  4.5318 -  (<file:drivers/video/pvr2fb.c>). Please see the file
  4.5319 -  <file:Documentation/fb/pvr2fb.txt>.
  4.5320 -
  4.5321 -Debug pvr2fb
  4.5322 -CONFIG_FB_PVR2_DEBUG
  4.5323 -  Say Y here if you wish for the pvr2fb driver to print out debugging
  4.5324 -  messages. Most people will want to say N here. If unsure, you will
  4.5325 -  also want to say N.
  4.5326 -
  4.5327 -Matrox unified accelerated driver
  4.5328 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX
  4.5329 -  Say Y here if you have a Matrox Millennium, Millennium II, Mystique,
  4.5330 -  Mystique 220, Productiva G100, Mystique G200, Millennium G200,
  4.5331 -  Matrox G400, G450 or G550 card in your box. At this time, support for 
  4.5332 -  the G-series digital output is almost non-existant.
  4.5333 -
  4.5334 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5335 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.5336 -  The module will be called matroxfb.o. If you want to compile it as
  4.5337 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5338 -
  4.5339 -  You can pass several parameters to the driver at boot time or at
  4.5340 -  module load time. The parameters look like "video=matrox:XXX", and
  4.5341 -  are described in <file:Documentation/fb/matroxfb.txt>.
  4.5342 -
  4.5343 -Matrox Millennium I/II support
  4.5344 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MILLENIUM
  4.5345 -  Say Y here if you have a Matrox Millennium or Matrox Millennium II
  4.5346 -  video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options" below,
  4.5347 -  you should check 4 bpp packed pixel, 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp
  4.5348 -  packed pixel, 24 bpp packed pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can
  4.5349 -  also use font widths different from 8.
  4.5350 -
  4.5351 -Matrox Mystique support
  4.5352 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MYSTIQUE
  4.5353 -  Say Y here if you have a Matrox Mystique or Matrox Mystique 220
  4.5354 -  video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options" below,
  4.5355 -  you should check 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp packed pixel, 24 bpp
  4.5356 -  packed pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can also use font widths
  4.5357 -  different from 8.
  4.5358 -
  4.5359 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_G450
  4.5360 -  Say Y here if you have a Matrox G100, G200, G400, G450 or G550 based
  4.5361 -  video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options", you
  4.5362 -  should check 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp packed pixel, 24 bpp packed
  4.5363 -  pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can also use font widths
  4.5364 -  different from 8.
  4.5365 -
  4.5366 -  If you need support for G400 secondary head, you must first say Y to
  4.5367 -  "I2C support" and "I2C bit-banging support" in the character devices
  4.5368 -  section, and then to "Matrox I2C support" and "G400 second head
  4.5369 -  support" here in the framebuffer section. G450/G550 secondary head
  4.5370 -  and digital output are supported without additional modules.
  4.5371 -  
  4.5372 -  The driver starts in monitor mode. You must use the matroxset tool 
  4.5373 -  (available at <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/matrox-latest/>) to 
  4.5374 -  swap primary and secondary head outputs, or to change output mode.  
  4.5375 -  Secondary head driver always start in 640x480 resolution and you 
  4.5376 -  must use fbset to change it.
  4.5377 -
  4.5378 -  Do not forget that second head supports only 16 and 32 bpp
  4.5379 -  packed pixels, so it is a good idea to compile them into the kernel
  4.5380 -  too. You can use only some font widths, as the driver uses generic
  4.5381 -  painting procedures (the secondary head does not use acceleration
  4.5382 -  engine).
  4.5383 -  
  4.5384 -  G450/G550 hardware can display TV picture only from secondary CRTC,
  4.5385 -  and it performs no scaling, so picture must have 525 or 625 lines.
  4.5386 -
  4.5387 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_G100A
  4.5388 -  Say Y here if you have a Matrox G100, G200 or G400 based
  4.5389 -  video card. If you select "Advanced lowlevel driver options", you
  4.5390 -  should check 8 bpp packed pixel, 16 bpp packed pixel, 24 bpp packed
  4.5391 -  pixel and 32 bpp packed pixel. You can also use font widths
  4.5392 -  different from 8.
  4.5393 -
  4.5394 -  If you need support for G400 secondary head, you must first say Y to
  4.5395 -  "I2C support" and "I2C bit-banging support" in the character devices
  4.5396 -  section, and then to "Matrox I2C support" and "G400 second head
  4.5397 -  support" here in the framebuffer section.
  4.5398 -
  4.5399 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_I2C
  4.5400 -  This drivers creates I2C buses which are needed for accessing the
  4.5401 -  DDC (I2C) bus present on all Matroxes, an I2C bus which
  4.5402 -  interconnects Matrox optional devices, like MGA-TVO on G200 and
  4.5403 -  G400, and the secondary head DDC bus, present on G400 only.
  4.5404 -
  4.5405 -  You can say Y or M here if you want to experiment with monitor
  4.5406 -  detection code. You must say Y or M here if you want to use either
  4.5407 -  second head of G400 or MGA-TVO on G200 or G400.
  4.5408 -
  4.5409 -  If you compile it as module, it will create a module named
  4.5410 -  i2c-matroxfb.o.
  4.5411 -
  4.5412 -Matrox G400 second head support
  4.5413 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MAVEN
  4.5414 -  WARNING !!! This support does not work with G450 !!!
  4.5415 -
  4.5416 -  Say Y or M here if you want to use a secondary head (meaning two
  4.5417 -  monitors in parallel) on G400 or MGA-TVO add-on on G200. Secondary
  4.5418 -  head is not compatible with accelerated XFree 3.3.x SVGA servers -
  4.5419 -  secondary head output is blanked while you are in X. With XFree
  4.5420 -  3.9.17 preview you can use both heads if you use SVGA over fbdev or
  4.5421 -  the fbdev driver on first head and the fbdev driver on second head.
  4.5422 -
  4.5423 -  If you compile it as module, two modules are created,
  4.5424 -  matroxfb_crtc2.o and matroxfb_maven.o. Matroxfb_maven is needed for
  4.5425 -  both G200 and G400, matroxfb_crtc2 is needed only by G400. You must
  4.5426 -  also load i2c-matroxfb to get it to run.
  4.5427 -
  4.5428 -  The driver starts in monitor mode and you must use the matroxset
  4.5429 -  tool (available at
  4.5430 -  <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/matrox-latest/>) to switch it to
  4.5431 -  PAL or NTSC or to swap primary and secondary head outputs.
  4.5432 -  Secondary head driver also always start in 640x480 resolution, you
  4.5433 -  must use fbset to change it.
  4.5434 -
  4.5435 -  Also do not forget that second head supports only 16 and 32 bpp
  4.5436 -  packed pixels, so it is a good idea to compile them into the kernel
  4.5437 -  too.  You can use only some font widths, as the driver uses generic
  4.5438 -  painting procedures (the secondary head does not use acceleration
  4.5439 -  engine).
  4.5440 -
  4.5441 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_PROC
  4.5442 -  Say Y or M here if you want to access some informations about driver
  4.5443 -  state through /proc interface.
  4.5444 -  
  4.5445 -  You should download matrox_pins tool (available at
  4.5446 -  <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/matrox-latest/>) to get human
  4.5447 -  readable output.
  4.5448 -  
  4.5449 -CONFIG_FB_MATROX_MULTIHEAD
  4.5450 -  Say Y here if you have more than one (supported) Matrox device in
  4.5451 -  your computer and you want to use all of them for different monitors
  4.5452 -  ("multihead"). If you have only one device, you should say N because
  4.5453 -  the driver compiled with Y is larger and a bit slower, especially on
  4.5454 -  ia32 (ix86).
  4.5455 -
  4.5456 -  If you said M to "Matrox unified accelerated driver" and N here, you
  4.5457 -  will still be able to use several Matrox devices simultaneously:
  4.5458 -  insert several instances of the module matroxfb.o into the kernel
  4.5459 -  with insmod, supplying the parameter "dev=N" where N is 0, 1, etc.
  4.5460 -  for the different Matrox devices. This method is slightly faster but
  4.5461 -  uses 40 KB of kernel memory per Matrox card.
  4.5462 -
  4.5463 -  There is no need for enabling 'Matrox multihead support' if you have
  4.5464 -  only one Matrox card in the box.
  4.5465 -
  4.5466 -3Dfx Voodoo Graphics / Voodoo2 frame buffer support
  4.5467 -CONFIG_FB_VOODOO1
  4.5468 -  Say Y here if you have a 3Dfx Voodoo Graphics (Voodoo1/sst1) or 
  4.5469 -  Voodoo2 (cvg) based graphics card.
  4.5470 -
  4.5471 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be 
  4.5472 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.5473 -  The module will be called sstfb.o. If you want to compile it as
  4.5474 -  a module, say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt.
  4.5475 -
  4.5476 -  WARNING: Do not use any application that uses the 3D engine
  4.5477 -  (namely glide) while using this driver.
  4.5478 -  Please read the file Documentation/fb/README-sstfb.txt for supported
  4.5479 -  options and other important info  support.
  4.5480 -
  4.5481 -MDA text console (dual-headed)
  4.5482 -CONFIG_MDA_CONSOLE
  4.5483 -  Say Y here if you have an old MDA or monochrome Hercules graphics
  4.5484 -  adapter in your system acting as a second head ( = video card). You
  4.5485 -  will then be able to use two monitors with your Linux system. Do not
  4.5486 -  say Y here if your MDA card is the primary card in your system; the
  4.5487 -  normal VGA driver will handle it.
  4.5488 -
  4.5489 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5490 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.5491 -  The module will be called mdacon.o. If you want to compile it as
  4.5492 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5493 -
  4.5494 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.5495 -
  4.5496 -SBUS and UPA framebuffers
  4.5497 -CONFIG_FB_SBUS
  4.5498 -  Say Y if you want support for SBUS or UPA based frame buffer device.
  4.5499 -
  4.5500 -Creator/Creator3D support
  4.5501 -CONFIG_FB_CREATOR
  4.5502 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the Creator and Creator3D
  4.5503 -  graphics boards.
  4.5504 -
  4.5505 -CGsix (GX,TurboGX) support
  4.5506 -CONFIG_FB_CGSIX
  4.5507 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the CGsix (GX, TurboGX)
  4.5508 -  frame buffer.
  4.5509 -
  4.5510 -BWtwo support
  4.5511 -CONFIG_FB_BWTWO
  4.5512 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the BWtwo frame buffer.
  4.5513 -
  4.5514 -CGthree support
  4.5515 -CONFIG_FB_CGTHREE
  4.5516 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the CGthree frame buffer.
  4.5517 -
  4.5518 -CGfourteen (SX) support
  4.5519 -CONFIG_FB_CGFOURTEEN
  4.5520 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the CGfourteen frame
  4.5521 -  buffer on Desktop SPARCsystems with the SX graphics option.
  4.5522 -
  4.5523 -P9100 (Sparcbook 3 only) support
  4.5524 -CONFIG_FB_P9100
  4.5525 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the P9100 card
  4.5526 -  supported on Sparcbook 3 machines.
  4.5527 -
  4.5528 -Leo (ZX) support
  4.5529 -CONFIG_FB_LEO
  4.5530 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the SBUS-based Sun ZX
  4.5531 -  (leo) frame buffer cards.
  4.5532 -
  4.5533 -IGA 168x display support
  4.5534 -CONFIG_FB_IGA
  4.5535 -  This is the framebuffer device for the INTERGRAPHICS 1680 and
  4.5536 -  successor frame buffer cards.
  4.5537 -
  4.5538 -TCX (SS4/SS5 only) support
  4.5539 -CONFIG_FB_TCX
  4.5540 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the TCX 24/8bit frame
  4.5541 -  buffer.
  4.5542 -
  4.5543 -HD64461 Frame Buffer support
  4.5544 -CONFIG_FB_HIT
  4.5545 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the Hitachi HD64461 LCD
  4.5546 -  frame buffer card.
  4.5547 -
  4.5548 -SIS display support
  4.5549 -CONFIG_FB_SIS
  4.5550 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the SiS 300, 315 and 330
  4.5551 -  series chipsets.  Documentation available at the maintainer's site
  4.5552 -  at <http://www.winischhofer.net/linuxsisvga.shtml>.
  4.5553 -
  4.5554 -SIS 300 series support
  4.5555 -CONFIG_FB_SIS_300
  4.5556 -  This enables support for SiS 300 series chipsets (300/305, 540, 630,
  4.5557 -  730).  Documentation available at the maintainer's website at
  4.5558 -   <http://www.winischhofer.net/linuxsisvga.shtml>.
  4.5559 -
  4.5560 -SIS 315/330 series support
  4.5561 -CONFIG_FB_SIS_315
  4.5562 -  This enables support for SiS 315/330 series chipsets (315, 550, 650,
  4.5563 -  M650, 651, 661FX, M661FX, 740, 741, 330). Documentation available at
  4.5564 -  the maintainer's site <http://www.winischhofer.net/linuxsisvga.shtml>.
  4.5565 -
  4.5566 -IMS Twin Turbo display support
  4.5567 -CONFIG_FB_IMSTT
  4.5568 -  The IMS Twin Turbo is a PCI-based frame buffer card bundled with
  4.5569 -  many Macintosh and compatible computers.
  4.5570 -
  4.5571 -CONFIG_FB_TX3912
  4.5572 -  The TX3912 is a Toshiba RISC processor based on the MIPS 3900 core;
  4.5573 -  see <http://www.toshiba.com/taec/components/Generic/risc/tx3912.htm>.
  4.5574 -
  4.5575 -  Say Y here to enable kernel support for the on-board framebuffer.
  4.5576 -
  4.5577 -Virtual Frame Buffer support (ONLY FOR TESTING!)
  4.5578 -CONFIG_FB_VIRTUAL
  4.5579 -  This is a `virtual' frame buffer device. It operates on a chunk of
  4.5580 -  unswappable kernel memory instead of on the memory of a graphics
  4.5581 -  board. This means you cannot see any output sent to this frame
  4.5582 -  buffer device, while it does consume precious memory. The main use
  4.5583 -  of this frame buffer device is testing and debugging the frame
  4.5584 -  buffer subsystem. Do NOT enable it for normal systems! To protect
  4.5585 -  the innocent, it has to be enabled explicitly at boot time using the
  4.5586 -  kernel option `video=vfb:'.
  4.5587 -
  4.5588 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5589 -  inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you want). The
  4.5590 -  module will be called vfb.o. If you want to compile it as a module,
  4.5591 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5592 -
  4.5593 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.5594 -
  4.5595 -Mach64 CT/VT/GT/LT (incl. 3D RAGE) support
  4.5596 -CONFIG_FB_ATY_CT
  4.5597 -  Say Y here to support use of ATI's 64-bit Rage boards (or other
  4.5598 -  boards based on the Mach64 CT, VT, GT, and LT chipsets) as a
  4.5599 -  framebuffer device.  The ATI product support page for these boards
  4.5600 -  is at <http://support.ati.com/products/pc/mach64/>.
  4.5601 -
  4.5602 -Sony Vaio Picturebook laptop LCD panel support
  4.5603 -CONFIG_FB_ATY_CT_VAIO_LCD
  4.5604 -  Say Y here if you want to use the full width of the Sony Vaio 
  4.5605 -  Picturebook laptops LCD panels (you will get a 128x30 console).
  4.5606 -
  4.5607 -  Note that you need to activate this mode using the 'vga=0x301'
  4.5608 -  option from your boot loader (lilo or loadlin).  See the
  4.5609 -  documentation of your boot loader about how to pass options to the
  4.5610 -  kernel.
  4.5611 -  
  4.5612 -Mach64 GX support
  4.5613 -CONFIG_FB_ATY_GX
  4.5614 -  Say Y here to support use of the ATI Mach64 Graphics Expression
  4.5615 -  board (or other boards based on the Mach64 GX chipset) as a
  4.5616 -  framebuffer device.  The ATI product support page for these boards
  4.5617 -  is at
  4.5618 -  <http://support.ati.com/products/pc/mach64/graphics_xpression.html>.
  4.5619 -
  4.5620 -Mach64 Generic LCD support
  4.5621 -CONFIG_FB_ATY_GENERIC_LCD
  4.5622 -  Enabling this option enables the Atyfb driver to drive LCD panels. It
  4.5623 -  will autodetect the resulution and format of your display and emulate
  4.5624 -  other resolutions using the hardware stretcher on the chip.
  4.5625 -  Say Y here if you have computer with a Rage LT Pro, Rage Mobility M1,
  4.5626 -  Rage XC or Rage XL chip and a laptop LCD display or any other LCD display
  4.5627 -  that needs to be digitally driven. It is not necessary to enable this
  4.5628 -  option if you are using an LCD display with a normal VGA connector,
  4.5629 -  but it won't hurt if you do.
  4.5630 -
  4.5631 -ATI Radeon display support
  4.5632 -CONFIG_FB_RADEON
  4.5633 -  Choose this option if you want to use an ATI Radeon graphics card as
  4.5634 -  a framebuffer device.  There are both PCI and AGP versions.  You
  4.5635 -  don't need to choose this to run the Radeon in plain VGA mode.
  4.5636 -  There is a product page at
  4.5637 -  <http://www.ati.com/na/pages/products/pc/radeon32/index.html>.
  4.5638 -
  4.5639 -SA-1100 LCD support
  4.5640 -CONFIG_FB_SA1100
  4.5641 -  This is a framebuffer device for the SA-1100 LCD Controller.
  4.5642 -  See <http://www.linux-fbdev.org/> for information on framebuffer
  4.5643 -  devices.
  4.5644 -
  4.5645 -  If you plan to use the LCD display with your SA-1100 system, say
  4.5646 -  Y here.
  4.5647 -
  4.5648 -Advanced low level driver options
  4.5649 -CONFIG_FBCON_ADVANCED
  4.5650 -  The frame buffer console uses character drawing routines that are
  4.5651 -  tailored to the specific organization of pixels in the memory of
  4.5652 -  your graphics hardware. These are called the low level frame buffer
  4.5653 -  console drivers. Note that they are used for text console output
  4.5654 -  only; they are NOT needed for graphical applications.
  4.5655 -
  4.5656 -  If you say N here, the needed low level drivers are automatically
  4.5657 -  enabled, depending on what frame buffer devices you selected above.
  4.5658 -  This is recommended for most users.
  4.5659 -
  4.5660 -  If you say Y here, you have more fine-grained control over which low
  4.5661 -  level drivers are enabled. You can e.g. leave out low level drivers
  4.5662 -  for color depths you do not intend to use for text consoles.
  4.5663 -
  4.5664 -  Low level frame buffer console drivers can be modules ( = code which
  4.5665 -  can be inserted and removed from the running kernel whenever you
  4.5666 -  want). The modules will be called fbcon-*.o. If you want to compile
  4.5667 -  (some of) them as modules, read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.5668 -
  4.5669 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.5670 -
  4.5671 -Monochrome support
  4.5672 -CONFIG_FBCON_MFB
  4.5673 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for monochrome
  4.5674 -  (2 colors) packed pixels.
  4.5675 -
  4.5676 -2 bpp packed pixels support
  4.5677 -CONFIG_FBCON_CFB2
  4.5678 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 2 bits per
  4.5679 -  pixel (4 colors) packed pixels.
  4.5680 -
  4.5681 -4 bpp packed pixels support
  4.5682 -CONFIG_FBCON_CFB4
  4.5683 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 4 bits per
  4.5684 -  pixel (16 colors) packed pixels.
  4.5685 -
  4.5686 -8 bpp packed pixels support
  4.5687 -CONFIG_FBCON_CFB8
  4.5688 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 8 bits per
  4.5689 -  pixel (256 colors) packed pixels.
  4.5690 -
  4.5691 -16 bpp packed pixels support
  4.5692 -CONFIG_FBCON_CFB16
  4.5693 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 15 or 16 bits
  4.5694 -  per pixel (32K or 64K colors, also known as `hicolor') packed
  4.5695 -  pixels.
  4.5696 -
  4.5697 -24 bpp packed pixels support
  4.5698 -CONFIG_FBCON_CFB24
  4.5699 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 24 bits per
  4.5700 -  pixel (16M colors, also known as `truecolor') packed pixels. It is
  4.5701 -  NOT for `sparse' 32 bits per pixel mode.
  4.5702 -
  4.5703 -32 bpp packed pixels support
  4.5704 -CONFIG_FBCON_CFB32
  4.5705 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 32 bits per
  4.5706 -  pixel (16M colors, also known as `truecolor') sparse packed pixels.
  4.5707 -
  4.5708 -Amiga bitplanes support
  4.5709 -CONFIG_FBCON_AFB
  4.5710 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 1 to 8
  4.5711 -  bitplanes (2 to 256 colors) on Amiga.
  4.5712 -
  4.5713 -Amiga interleaved bitplanes support
  4.5714 -CONFIG_FBCON_ILBM
  4.5715 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 1 to 8
  4.5716 -  interleaved bitplanes (2 to 256 colors) on Amiga.
  4.5717 -
  4.5718 -Atari interleaved bitplanes (2 planes) support
  4.5719 -CONFIG_FBCON_IPLAN2P2
  4.5720 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 2 interleaved
  4.5721 -  bitplanes (4 colors) on Atari.
  4.5722 -
  4.5723 -Atari interleaved bitplanes (4 planes) support
  4.5724 -CONFIG_FBCON_IPLAN2P4
  4.5725 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 4 interleaved
  4.5726 -  bitplanes (16 colors) on Atari.
  4.5727 -
  4.5728 -Atari interleaved bitplanes (8 planes) support
  4.5729 -CONFIG_FBCON_IPLAN2P8
  4.5730 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 8 interleaved
  4.5731 -  bitplanes (256 colors) on Atari.
  4.5732 -
  4.5733 -Mac variable bpp packed pixels support
  4.5734 -CONFIG_FBCON_MAC
  4.5735 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for 1/2/4/8/16/32
  4.5736 -  bits per pixel packed pixels on Mac. It supports variable font
  4.5737 -  widths for low resolution screens.
  4.5738 -
  4.5739 -Permedia3 support (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.5740 -CONFIG_FB_PM3
  4.5741 -  This is the frame buffer device driver for the 3DLabs Permedia3
  4.5742 -  chipset, used in Formac ProFormance III, 3DLabs Oxygen VX1 &
  4.5743 -  similar boards, 3DLabs Permedia3 Create!, Appian Jeronimo 2000
  4.5744 -  and maybe other boards.
  4.5745 -
  4.5746 -HGA monochrome support
  4.5747 -CONFIG_FBCON_HGA
  4.5748 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for Hercules mono
  4.5749 -  graphics cards.
  4.5750 -
  4.5751 -VGA characters/attributes support
  4.5752 -CONFIG_FBCON_VGA
  4.5753 -  This is the low level frame buffer console driver for VGA text mode;
  4.5754 -  it is used by frame buffer device drivers that support VGA text
  4.5755 -  mode.
  4.5756 -
  4.5757 -Parallel-port support
  4.5758 -CONFIG_PARPORT
  4.5759 -  If you want to use devices connected to your machine's parallel port
  4.5760 -  (the connector at the computer with 25 holes), e.g. printer, ZIP
  4.5761 -  drive, PLIP link (Parallel Line Internet Protocol is mainly used to
  4.5762 -  create a mini network by connecting the parallel ports of two local
  4.5763 -  machines) etc., then you need to say Y here; please read
  4.5764 -  <file:Documentation/parport.txt> and
  4.5765 -  <file:drivers/parport/BUGS-parport>.
  4.5766 -
  4.5767 -  For extensive information about drivers for many devices attaching
  4.5768 -  to the parallel port see <http://www.torque.net/linux-pp.html> on
  4.5769 -  the WWW.
  4.5770 -
  4.5771 -  It is possible to share a single parallel port among several devices
  4.5772 -  and it is safe to compile all the corresponding drivers into the
  4.5773 -  kernel.  If you want to compile parallel port support as a module
  4.5774 -  ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running
  4.5775 -  kernel whenever you want), say M here and read
  4.5776 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.5777 -  parport.o.  If you have more than one parallel port and want to
  4.5778 -  specify which port and IRQ to be used by this driver at module load
  4.5779 -  time, take a look at <file:Documentation/parport.txt>.
  4.5780 -
  4.5781 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.5782 -
  4.5783 -PC-style hardware
  4.5784 -CONFIG_PARPORT_PC
  4.5785 -  You should say Y here if you have a PC-style parallel port. All IBM
  4.5786 -  PC compatible computers and some Alphas have PC-style parallel
  4.5787 -  ports.
  4.5788 -
  4.5789 -  This code is also available as a module.  If you want to compile it
  4.5790 -  as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the
  4.5791 -  running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read
  4.5792 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.5793 -  parport_pc.o.
  4.5794 -
  4.5795 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.5796 -
  4.5797 -Parallel+serial PCI multi-IO card support
  4.5798 -CONFIG_PARPORT_SERIAL
  4.5799 -  This adds support for multi-IO PCI cards that have parallel and
  4.5800 -  serial ports.  You should say Y or M here.  If you say M, the module
  4.5801 -  will be called parport_serial.o.
  4.5802 -
  4.5803 -Use FIFO/DMA if available
  4.5804 -CONFIG_PARPORT_PC_FIFO
  4.5805 -  Many parallel port chipsets provide hardware that can speed up
  4.5806 -  printing. Say Y here if you want to take advantage of that.
  4.5807 -
  4.5808 -  As well as actually having a FIFO, or DMA capability, the kernel
  4.5809 -  will need to know which IRQ the parallel port has.  By default,
  4.5810 -  parallel port interrupts will not be used, and so neither will the
  4.5811 -  FIFO.  See <file:Documentation/parport.txt> to find out how to
  4.5812 -  specify which IRQ/DMA to use.
  4.5813 -
  4.5814 -SuperIO chipset support
  4.5815 -CONFIG_PARPORT_PC_SUPERIO
  4.5816 -  Saying Y here enables some probes for Super-IO chipsets in order to
  4.5817 -  find out things like base addresses, IRQ lines and DMA channels.  It
  4.5818 -  is safe to say N.
  4.5819 -
  4.5820 -Support for PCMCIA management for PC-style ports
  4.5821 -CONFIG_PARPORT_PC_PCMCIA
  4.5822 -  Say Y here if you need PCMCIA support for your PC-style parallel
  4.5823 -  ports. If unsure, say N.
  4.5824 -
  4.5825 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.5826 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.5827 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.5828 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.5829 -  parport_cs.o
  4.5830 -
  4.5831 -Support foreign hardware
  4.5832 -CONFIG_PARPORT_OTHER
  4.5833 -  Say Y here if you want to be able to load driver modules to support
  4.5834 -  other non-standard types of parallel ports. This causes a
  4.5835 -  performance loss, so most people say N.
  4.5836 -
  4.5837 -Amiga built-in parallel port support
  4.5838 -CONFIG_PARPORT_AMIGA
  4.5839 -  Say Y here if you need support for the parallel port hardware on
  4.5840 -  Amiga machines. This code is also available as a module (say M),
  4.5841 -  called parport_amiga.o. If in doubt, saying N is the safe plan.
  4.5842 -
  4.5843 -Atari built-in parallel port support
  4.5844 -CONFIG_PARPORT_ATARI
  4.5845 -  Say Y here if you need support for the parallel port hardware on
  4.5846 -  Atari machines. This code is also available as a module (say M),
  4.5847 -  called parport_atari.o. If in doubt, saying N is the safe plan.
  4.5848 -
  4.5849 -Multiface III parallel port support
  4.5850 -CONFIG_PARPORT_MFC3
  4.5851 -  Say Y here if you need parallel port support for the MFC3 card.
  4.5852 -  This code is also available as a module (say M), called
  4.5853 -  parport_mfc3.o. If in doubt, saying N is the safe plan.
  4.5854 -
  4.5855 -Support IEEE 1284 status readback
  4.5856 -CONFIG_PRINTER_READBACK
  4.5857 -  If you have a device on your parallel port that support this
  4.5858 -  protocol, this option will allow the device to report its status. It
  4.5859 -  is safe to say Y.
  4.5860 -
  4.5861 -IEEE 1284 transfer modes
  4.5862 -CONFIG_PARPORT_1284
  4.5863 -  If you have a printer that supports status readback or device ID, or
  4.5864 -  want to use a device that uses enhanced parallel port transfer modes
  4.5865 -  such as EPP and ECP, say Y here to enable advanced IEEE 1284
  4.5866 -  transfer modes. Also say Y if you want device ID information to
  4.5867 -  appear in /proc/sys/dev/parport/*/autoprobe*. It is safe to say N.
  4.5868 -
  4.5869 -Enable loadable module support
  4.5870 -CONFIG_MODULES
  4.5871 -  Kernel modules are small pieces of compiled code which can be
  4.5872 -  inserted in or removed from the running kernel, using the programs
  4.5873 -  insmod and rmmod. This is described in the file
  4.5874 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>, including the fact that you have
  4.5875 -  to say "make modules" in order to compile the modules that you chose
  4.5876 -  during kernel configuration.  Modules can be device drivers, file
  4.5877 -  systems, binary executable formats, and so on. If you think that you
  4.5878 -  may want to make use of modules with this kernel in the future, then
  4.5879 -  say Y here.  If unsure, say Y.
  4.5880 -
  4.5881 -Set version information on all symbols for modules
  4.5882 -CONFIG_MODVERSIONS
  4.5883 -  Usually, modules have to be recompiled whenever you switch to a new
  4.5884 -  kernel.  Saying Y here makes it possible, and safe, to use the
  4.5885 -  same modules even after compiling a new kernel; this requires the
  4.5886 -  program modprobe. All the software needed for module support is in
  4.5887 -  the modutils package (check the file <file:Documentation/Changes>
  4.5888 -  for location and latest version).  NOTE: if you say Y here but don't
  4.5889 -  have the program genksyms (which is also contained in the above
  4.5890 -  mentioned modutils package), then the building of your kernel will
  4.5891 -  fail.  If you are going to use modules that are generated from
  4.5892 -  non-kernel sources, you would benefit from this option.  Otherwise
  4.5893 -  it's not that important.  So, N ought to be a safe bet.
  4.5894 -
  4.5895 -Kernel module loader support
  4.5896 -CONFIG_KMOD
  4.5897 -  Normally when you have selected some drivers and/or file systems to
  4.5898 -  be created as loadable modules, you also have the responsibility to
  4.5899 -  load the corresponding modules (using the programs insmod or
  4.5900 -  modprobe) before you can use them. If you say Y here however, the
  4.5901 -  kernel will be able to load modules for itself: when a part of the
  4.5902 -  kernel needs a module, it runs modprobe with the appropriate
  4.5903 -  arguments, thereby loading the module if it is available. (This is a
  4.5904 -  replacement for kerneld.) Say Y here and read about configuring it
  4.5905 -  in <file:Documentation/kmod.txt>.
  4.5906 -
  4.5907 -ARP daemon support
  4.5908 -CONFIG_ARPD
  4.5909 -  Normally, the kernel maintains an internal cache which maps IP
  4.5910 -  addresses to hardware addresses on the local network, so that
  4.5911 -  Ethernet/Token Ring/ etc. frames are sent to the proper address on
  4.5912 -  the physical networking layer. For small networks having a few
  4.5913 -  hundred directly connected hosts or less, keeping this address
  4.5914 -  resolution (ARP) cache inside the kernel works well. However,
  4.5915 -  maintaining an internal ARP cache does not work well for very large
  4.5916 -  switched networks, and will use a lot of kernel memory if TCP/IP
  4.5917 -  connections are made to many machines on the network.
  4.5918 -
  4.5919 -  If you say Y here, the kernel's internal ARP cache will never grow
  4.5920 -  to more than 256 entries (the oldest entries are expired in a LIFO
  4.5921 -  manner) and communication will be attempted with the user space ARP
  4.5922 -  daemon arpd. Arpd then answers the address resolution request either
  4.5923 -  from its own cache or by asking the net.
  4.5924 -
  4.5925 -  This code is experimental and also obsolete. If you want to use it,
  4.5926 -  you need to find a version of the daemon arpd on the net somewhere,
  4.5927 -  and you should also say Y to "Kernel/User network link driver",
  4.5928 -  below. If unsure, say N.
  4.5929 -
  4.5930 -TCP/IP networking
  4.5931 -CONFIG_INET
  4.5932 -  These are the protocols used on the Internet and on most local
  4.5933 -  Ethernets. It is highly recommended to say Y here (this will enlarge
  4.5934 -  your kernel by about 144 KB), since some programs (e.g. the X window
  4.5935 -  system) use TCP/IP even if your machine is not connected to any
  4.5936 -  other computer. You will get the so-called loopback device which
  4.5937 -  allows you to ping yourself (great fun, that!).
  4.5938 -
  4.5939 -  For an excellent introduction to Linux networking, please read the
  4.5940 -  NET-3-HOWTO, available from
  4.5941 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.5942 -
  4.5943 -  This option is also necessary if you want to use the full power of
  4.5944 -  term (term is a program which gives you almost full Internet
  4.5945 -  connectivity if you have a regular dial up shell account on some
  4.5946 -  Internet connected Unix computer; for more information, read
  4.5947 -  <http://www.bart.nl/~patrickr/term-howto/Term-HOWTO.html>).
  4.5948 -
  4.5949 -  If you say Y here and also to "/proc file system support" and
  4.5950 -  "Sysctl support" below, you can change various aspects of the
  4.5951 -  behaviour of the TCP/IP code by writing to the (virtual) files in
  4.5952 -  /proc/sys/net/ipv4/*; the options are explained in the file
  4.5953 -  <file:Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt>.
  4.5954 -
  4.5955 -  Short answer: say Y.
  4.5956 -
  4.5957 -IP multicasting
  4.5958 -CONFIG_IP_MULTICAST
  4.5959 -  This is code for addressing several networked computers at once,
  4.5960 -  enlarging your kernel by about 2 KB. You need multicasting if you
  4.5961 -  intend to participate in the MBONE, a high bandwidth network on top
  4.5962 -  of the Internet which carries audio and video broadcasts. More
  4.5963 -  information about the MBONE is on the WWW at
  4.5964 -  <http://www-itg.lbl.gov/mbone/>. Information about the multicast
  4.5965 -  capabilities of the various network cards is contained in
  4.5966 -  <file:Documentation/networking/multicast.txt>. For most people, it's
  4.5967 -  safe to say N.
  4.5968 -
  4.5969 -Advanced router
  4.5970 -CONFIG_IP_ADVANCED_ROUTER
  4.5971 -  If you intend to run your Linux box mostly as a router, i.e. as a
  4.5972 -  computer that forwards and redistributes network packets, say Y; you
  4.5973 -  will then be presented with several options that allow more precise
  4.5974 -  control about the routing process.
  4.5975 -
  4.5976 -  The answer to this question won't directly affect the kernel:
  4.5977 -  answering N will just cause the configurator to skip all the
  4.5978 -  questions about advanced routing.
  4.5979 -
  4.5980 -  Note that your box can only act as a router if you enable IP
  4.5981 -  forwarding in your kernel; you can do that by saying Y to "/proc
  4.5982 -  file system support" and "Sysctl support" below and executing the
  4.5983 -  line
  4.5984 -
  4.5985 -    echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
  4.5986 -
  4.5987 -  at boot time after the /proc file system has been mounted.
  4.5988 -
  4.5989 -  If you turn on IP forwarding, you will also get the rp_filter, which
  4.5990 -  automatically rejects incoming packets if the routing table entry
  4.5991 -  for their source address doesn't match the network interface they're
  4.5992 -  arriving on. This has security advantages because it prevents the
  4.5993 -  so-called IP spoofing, however it can pose problems if you use
  4.5994 -  asymmetric routing (packets from you to a host take a different path
  4.5995 -  than packets from that host to you) or if you operate a non-routing
  4.5996 -  host which has several IP addresses on different interfaces. To turn
  4.5997 -  rp_filter off use:
  4.5998 -
  4.5999 -        echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/<device>/rp_filter
  4.6000 -  or
  4.6001 -        echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
  4.6002 -
  4.6003 -  If unsure, say N here.
  4.6004 -
  4.6005 -Policy routing
  4.6006 -CONFIG_IP_MULTIPLE_TABLES
  4.6007 -  Normally, a router decides what to do with a received packet based
  4.6008 -  solely on the packet's final destination address. If you say Y here,
  4.6009 -  the Linux router will also be able to take the packet's source
  4.6010 -  address into account. Furthermore, if you also say Y to "Use TOS
  4.6011 -  value as routing key" below, the TOS (Type-Of-Service) field of the
  4.6012 -  packet can be used for routing decisions as well. In addition, if
  4.6013 -  you say Y here and to "Fast network address translation" below,
  4.6014 -  the router will also be able to modify source and destination
  4.6015 -  addresses of forwarded packets.
  4.6016 -
  4.6017 -  If you are interested in this, please see the preliminary
  4.6018 -  documentation at <http://www.compendium.com.ar/policy-routing.txt>
  4.6019 -  and <ftp://post.tepkom.ru/pub/vol2/Linux/docs/advanced-routing.tex>.
  4.6020 -  You will need supporting software from
  4.6021 -  <ftp://ftp.inr.ac.ru/ip-routing/>.
  4.6022 -
  4.6023 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.6024 -
  4.6025 -Equal cost multipath
  4.6026 -CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_MULTIPATH
  4.6027 -  Normally, the routing tables specify a single action to be taken in
  4.6028 -  a deterministic manner for a given packet. If you say Y here
  4.6029 -  however, it becomes possible to attach several actions to a packet
  4.6030 -  pattern, in effect specifying several alternative paths to travel
  4.6031 -  for those packets. The router considers all these paths to be of
  4.6032 -  equal "cost" and chooses one of them in a non-deterministic fashion
  4.6033 -  if a matching packet arrives.
  4.6034 -
  4.6035 -Use TOS value as routing key
  4.6036 -CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_TOS
  4.6037 -  The header of every IP packet carries a TOS (Type Of Service) value
  4.6038 -  with which the packet requests a certain treatment, e.g. low
  4.6039 -  latency (for interactive traffic), high throughput, or high
  4.6040 -  reliability.  If you say Y here, you will be able to specify
  4.6041 -  different routes for packets with different TOS values.
  4.6042 -
  4.6043 -Use netfilter MARK value as routing key
  4.6044 -CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_FWMARK
  4.6045 -  If you say Y here, you will be able to specify different routes for
  4.6046 -  packets with different mark values (see iptables(8), MARK target).
  4.6047 -
  4.6048 -Verbose route monitoring
  4.6049 -CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_VERBOSE
  4.6050 -  If you say Y here, which is recommended, then the kernel will print
  4.6051 -  verbose messages regarding the routing, for example warnings about
  4.6052 -  received packets which look strange and could be evidence of an
  4.6053 -  attack or a misconfigured system somewhere. The information is
  4.6054 -  handled by the klogd daemon which is responsible for kernel messages
  4.6055 -  ("man klogd").
  4.6056 -
  4.6057 -Fast network address translation
  4.6058 -CONFIG_IP_ROUTE_NAT
  4.6059 -  If you say Y here, your router will be able to modify source and
  4.6060 -  destination addresses of packets that pass through it, in a manner
  4.6061 -  you specify.  General information about Network Address Translation
  4.6062 -  can be gotten from the document
  4.6063 -  <http://www.csn.tu-chemnitz.de/~mha/linux-ip-nat/diplom/nat.html>.
  4.6064 -
  4.6065 -Kernel level IP autoconfiguration
  4.6066 -CONFIG_IP_PNP
  4.6067 -  This enables automatic configuration of IP addresses of devices and
  4.6068 -  of the routing table during kernel boot, based on either information
  4.6069 -  supplied on the kernel command line or by BOOTP or RARP protocols.
  4.6070 -  You need to say Y only for diskless machines requiring network
  4.6071 -  access to boot (in which case you want to say Y to "Root file system
  4.6072 -  on NFS" as well), because all other machines configure the network
  4.6073 -  in their startup scripts.
  4.6074 -
  4.6075 -BOOTP support
  4.6076 -CONFIG_IP_PNP_BOOTP
  4.6077 -  If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
  4.6078 -  one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
  4.6079 -  net via NFS and you want the IP address of your computer to be
  4.6080 -  discovered automatically at boot time using the BOOTP protocol (a
  4.6081 -  special protocol designed for doing this job), say Y here. In case
  4.6082 -  the boot ROM of your network card was designed for booting Linux and
  4.6083 -  does BOOTP itself, providing all necessary information on the kernel
  4.6084 -  command line, you can say N here. If unsure, say Y. Note that if you
  4.6085 -  want to use BOOTP, a BOOTP server must be operating on your network.
  4.6086 -  Read <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for details.
  4.6087 -
  4.6088 -DHCP support
  4.6089 -CONFIG_IP_PNP_DHCP
  4.6090 -  If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
  4.6091 -  one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
  4.6092 -  net via NFS and you want the IP address of your computer to be
  4.6093 -  discovered automatically at boot time using the DHCP protocol (a
  4.6094 -  special protocol designed for doing this job), say Y here. In case
  4.6095 -  the boot ROM of your network card was designed for booting Linux and
  4.6096 -  does DHCP itself, providing all necessary information on the kernel
  4.6097 -  command line, you can say N here.
  4.6098 -
  4.6099 -  If unsure, say Y. Note that if you want to use DHCP, a DHCP server
  4.6100 -  must be operating on your network.  Read
  4.6101 -  <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for details.
  4.6102 -
  4.6103 -RARP support
  4.6104 -CONFIG_IP_PNP_RARP
  4.6105 -  If you want your Linux box to mount its whole root file system (the
  4.6106 -  one containing the directory /) from some other computer over the
  4.6107 -  net via NFS and you want the IP address of your computer to be
  4.6108 -  discovered automatically at boot time using the RARP protocol (an
  4.6109 -  older protocol which is being obsoleted by BOOTP and DHCP), say Y
  4.6110 -  here. Note that if you want to use RARP, a RARP server must be
  4.6111 -  operating on your network. Read <file:Documentation/nfsroot.txt> for
  4.6112 -  details.
  4.6113 -
  4.6114 -IP tunneling
  4.6115 -CONFIG_NET_IPIP
  4.6116 -  Tunneling means encapsulating data of one protocol type within
  4.6117 -  another protocol and sending it over a channel that understands the
  4.6118 -  encapsulating protocol. This particular tunneling driver implements
  4.6119 -  encapsulation of IP within IP, which sounds kind of pointless, but
  4.6120 -  can be useful if you want to make your (or some other) machine
  4.6121 -  appear on a different network than it physically is, or to use
  4.6122 -  mobile-IP facilities (allowing laptops to seamlessly move between
  4.6123 -  networks without changing their IP addresses; check out
  4.6124 -  <http://anchor.cs.binghamton.edu/~mobileip/LJ/index.html>).
  4.6125 -
  4.6126 -  Saying Y to this option will produce two modules ( = code which can
  4.6127 -  be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
  4.6128 -  want). Most people won't need this and can say N.
  4.6129 -
  4.6130 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6131 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6132 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.6133 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.6134 -  ipip.o
  4.6135 -
  4.6136 -GRE tunnels over IP
  4.6137 -CONFIG_NET_IPGRE
  4.6138 -  Tunneling means encapsulating data of one protocol type within
  4.6139 -  another protocol and sending it over a channel that understands the
  4.6140 -  encapsulating protocol. This particular tunneling driver implements
  4.6141 -  GRE (Generic Routing Encapsulation) and at this time allows
  4.6142 -  encapsulating of IPv4 or IPv6 over existing IPv4 infrastructure.
  4.6143 -  This driver is useful if the other endpoint is a Cisco router: Cisco
  4.6144 -  likes GRE much better than the other Linux tunneling driver ("IP
  4.6145 -  tunneling" above). In addition, GRE allows multicast redistribution
  4.6146 -  through the tunnel.
  4.6147 -
  4.6148 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6149 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6150 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.6151 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.6152 -  ip_gre.o
  4.6153 -
  4.6154 -Broadcast GRE over IP
  4.6155 -CONFIG_NET_IPGRE_BROADCAST
  4.6156 -  One application of GRE/IP is to construct a broadcast WAN (Wide Area
  4.6157 -  Network), which looks like a normal Ethernet LAN (Local Area
  4.6158 -  Network), but can be distributed all over the Internet. If you want
  4.6159 -  to do that, say Y here and to "IP multicast routing" below.
  4.6160 -
  4.6161 -IP multicast routing
  4.6162 -CONFIG_IP_MROUTE
  4.6163 -  This is used if you want your machine to act as a router for IP
  4.6164 -  packets that have several destination addresses. It is needed on the
  4.6165 -  MBONE, a high bandwidth network on top of the Internet which carries
  4.6166 -  audio and video broadcasts. In order to do that, you would most
  4.6167 -  likely run the program mrouted. Information about the multicast
  4.6168 -  capabilities of the various network cards is contained in
  4.6169 -  <file:Documentation/networking/multicast.txt>. If you haven't heard
  4.6170 -  about it, you don't need it.
  4.6171 -
  4.6172 -PIM-SM version 1 support
  4.6173 -CONFIG_IP_PIMSM_V1
  4.6174 -  Kernel side support for Sparse Mode PIM (Protocol Independent
  4.6175 -  Multicast) version 1. This multicast routing protocol is used widely
  4.6176 -  because Cisco supports it. You need special software to use it
  4.6177 -  (pimd-v1). Please see <http://netweb.usc.edu/pim/> for more
  4.6178 -  information about PIM.
  4.6179 -
  4.6180 -  Say Y if you want to use PIM-SM v1. Note that you can say N here if
  4.6181 -  you just want to use Dense Mode PIM.
  4.6182 -
  4.6183 -PIM-SM version 2 support
  4.6184 -CONFIG_IP_PIMSM_V2
  4.6185 -  Kernel side support for Sparse Mode PIM version 2. In order to use
  4.6186 -  this, you need an experimental routing daemon supporting it (pimd or
  4.6187 -  gated-5). This routing protocol is not used widely, so say N unless
  4.6188 -  you want to play with it.
  4.6189 -
  4.6190 -Unix domain sockets
  4.6191 -CONFIG_UNIX
  4.6192 -  If you say Y here, you will include support for Unix domain sockets;
  4.6193 -  sockets are the standard Unix mechanism for establishing and
  4.6194 -  accessing network connections.  Many commonly used programs such as
  4.6195 -  the X Window system and syslog use these sockets even if your
  4.6196 -  machine is not connected to any network.  Unless you are working on
  4.6197 -  an embedded system or something similar, you therefore definitely
  4.6198 -  want to say Y here.
  4.6199 -
  4.6200 -  However, the socket support is also available as a module ( = code
  4.6201 -  which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.6202 -  whenever you want).  If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.6203 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be
  4.6204 -  called unix.o.  If you try building this as a module and you have
  4.6205 -  said Y to "Kernel module loader support" above, be sure to add
  4.6206 -  'alias net-pf-1 unix' to your /etc/modules.conf file. Note that
  4.6207 -  several important services won't work correctly if you say M here
  4.6208 -  and then neglect to load the module.
  4.6209 -
  4.6210 -  Say Y unless you know what you are doing.
  4.6211 -
  4.6212 -The IPv6 protocol
  4.6213 -CONFIG_IPV6
  4.6214 -  This is experimental support for the next version of the Internet
  4.6215 -  Protocol: IP version 6 (also called IPng "IP next generation").
  4.6216 -  Features of this new protocol include: expanded address space,
  4.6217 -  authentication and privacy, and seamless interoperability with the
  4.6218 -  current version of IP (IP version 4). For general information about
  4.6219 -  IPv6, see <http://playground.sun.com/pub/ipng/html/ipng-main.html>;
  4.6220 -  for specific information about IPv6 under Linux read the HOWTO at
  4.6221 -  <http://www.bieringer.de/linux/IPv6/> and the file net/ipv6/README
  4.6222 -  in the kernel source.
  4.6223 -
  4.6224 -  If you want to use IPv6, please upgrade to the newest net-tools as
  4.6225 -  given in <file:Documentation/Changes>. You will still be able to do
  4.6226 -  regular IPv4 networking as well.
  4.6227 -
  4.6228 -  This protocol support is also available as a module ( = code which
  4.6229 -  can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
  4.6230 -  want). The module will be called ipv6.o. If you want to compile it
  4.6231 -  as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.6232 -
  4.6233 -  It is safe to say N here for now.
  4.6234 -
  4.6235 -The SCTP Protocol (EXPERIMENTAL)
  4.6236 -CONFIG_IP_SCTP
  4.6237 -  Stream Control Transmission Protocol
  4.6238 -
  4.6239 -  From RFC 2960 (http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2960.txt)
  4.6240 -
  4.6241 -  "SCTP is a reliable transport protocol operating on top of a
  4.6242 -  connectionless packet network such as IP.  It offers the following
  4.6243 -  services to its users:
  4.6244 -
  4.6245 -  -- acknowledged error-free non-duplicated transfer of user data,
  4.6246 -  -- data fragmentation to conform to discovered path MTU size,
  4.6247 -  -- sequenced delivery of user messages within multiple streams,
  4.6248 -  with an option for order-of-arrival delivery of individual user
  4.6249 -  messages,
  4.6250 -  -- optional bundling of multiple user messages into a single SCTP
  4.6251 -  packet, and
  4.6252 -  -- network-level fault tolerance through supporting of multi-
  4.6253 -  homing at either or both ends of an association."
  4.6254 -
  4.6255 -  This protocol support is also available as a module ( = code which
  4.6256 -  can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
  4.6257 -  want). The module will be called sctp. If you want to compile it
  4.6258 -  as a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.6259 -
  4.6260 -  If in doubt, say N.
  4.6261 -
  4.6262 -SCTP: Debug messages
  4.6263 -CONFIG_SCTP_DBG_MSG
  4.6264 -  If you say Y, this will enable verbose debugging messages. 
  4.6265 -
  4.6266 -  If unsure, say N.  However, if you are running into problems, use 
  4.6267 -  this option to gather detailed trace information
  4.6268 -
  4.6269 -SCTP: Debug object counts
  4.6270 -CONFIG_SCTP_DBG_OBJCNT
  4.6271 -  If you say Y, this will enable debugging support for counting the 
  4.6272 -  type of objects that are currently allocated.  This is useful for 
  4.6273 -  identifying memory leaks.   If the /proc filesystem is enabled this 
  4.6274 -  debug information can be viewed by 
  4.6275 -  'cat /proc/net/sctp/sctp_dbg_objcnt'
  4.6276 -
  4.6277 -  If unsure, say N
  4.6278 -
  4.6279 -#choice
  4.6280 -SCTP: HMAC algorithm
  4.6281 -CONFIG_SCTP_HMAC_NONE
  4.6282 -  Choose an HMAC algorithm to be used during association establishment.
  4.6283 -  It can be one of SHA1, MD5 or NONE. It is advised to use either HMAC-MD5
  4.6284 -  or HMAC-SHA1.
  4.6285 -  See configuration for Cryptographic API and enable these algorithms
  4.6286 -  to make usable by SCTP.
  4.6287 -
  4.6288 -SCTP: SHA1 HMAC algorithm
  4.6289 -CONFIG_SCTP_HMAC_SHA1
  4.6290 -  Enable the use of HMAC-SHA1 during association establishment.  It 
  4.6291 -  is advised to use either HMAC-MD5 or HMAC-SHA1.
  4.6292 -  See configuration for Cryptographic API and enable these algorithms
  4.6293 -  to make usable by SCTP.
  4.6294 -
  4.6295 -SCTP: MD5 HMAC algorithm
  4.6296 -config SCTP_HMAC_MD5
  4.6297 -  Enable the use of HMAC-MD5 during association establishment.  It is 
  4.6298 -  advised to use either HMAC-MD5 or HMAC-SHA1.
  4.6299 -  See configuration for Cryptographic API and enable these algorithms
  4.6300 -  to make usable by SCTP.
  4.6301 -
  4.6302 -Kernel httpd acceleration
  4.6303 -CONFIG_KHTTPD
  4.6304 -  The kernel httpd acceleration daemon (kHTTPd) is a (limited) web
  4.6305 -  server built into the kernel. It is limited since it can only serve
  4.6306 -  files from the file system and cannot deal with executable content
  4.6307 -  such as CGI scripts. Serving files is sped up if you use kHTTPd.
  4.6308 -  If kHTTPd is not able to fulfill a request, it can transparently
  4.6309 -  pass it through to a user space web server such as apache.
  4.6310 -
  4.6311 -  Saying "M" here builds the kHTTPd module; this is NOT enough to have
  4.6312 -  a working kHTTPd. For safety reasons, the module has to be activated
  4.6313 -  by doing a "echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/khttpd/start" after inserting the
  4.6314 -  module.
  4.6315 -
  4.6316 -  Before using this, read the README in net/khttpd !
  4.6317 -
  4.6318 -  The kHTTPd is experimental. Be careful when using it on a production
  4.6319 -  machine. Also note that kHTTPd doesn't support virtual servers yet.
  4.6320 -
  4.6321 -The IPX protocol
  4.6322 -CONFIG_IPX
  4.6323 -  This is support for the Novell networking protocol, IPX, commonly
  4.6324 -  used for local networks of Windows machines.  You need it if you
  4.6325 -  want to access Novell NetWare file or print servers using the Linux
  4.6326 -  Novell client ncpfs (available from
  4.6327 -  <ftp://platan.vc.cvut.cz/pub/linux/ncpfs/>) or from
  4.6328 -  within the Linux DOS emulator DOSEMU (read the DOSEMU-HOWTO,
  4.6329 -  available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>).  In order
  4.6330 -  to do the former, you'll also have to say Y to "NCP file system
  4.6331 -  support", below.
  4.6332 -
  4.6333 -  IPX is similar in scope to IP, while SPX, which runs on top of IPX,
  4.6334 -  is similar to TCP. There is also experimental support for SPX in
  4.6335 -  Linux (see "SPX networking", below).
  4.6336 -
  4.6337 -  To turn your Linux box into a fully featured NetWare file server and
  4.6338 -  IPX router, say Y here and fetch either lwared from
  4.6339 -  <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/network/daemons/> or
  4.6340 -  mars_nwe from <ftp://www.compu-art.de/mars_nwe/>. For more
  4.6341 -  information, read the IPX-HOWTO available from
  4.6342 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.6343 -
  4.6344 -  General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
  4.6345 -  Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.
  4.6346 -
  4.6347 -  The IPX driver would enlarge your kernel by about 16 KB. This driver
  4.6348 -  is also available as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and
  4.6349 -  removed from the running kernel whenever you want).  The module will
  4.6350 -  be called ipx.o.  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here
  4.6351 -  and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  Unless you want to
  4.6352 -  integrate your Linux box with a local Novell network, say N.
  4.6353 -
  4.6354 -Full internal IPX network
  4.6355 -CONFIG_IPX_INTERN
  4.6356 -  Every IPX network has an address that identifies it. Sometimes it is
  4.6357 -  useful to give an IPX "network" address to your Linux box as well
  4.6358 -  (for example if your box is acting as a file server for different
  4.6359 -  IPX networks: it will then be accessible from everywhere using the
  4.6360 -  same address). The way this is done is to create a virtual internal
  4.6361 -  "network" inside your box and to assign an IPX address to this
  4.6362 -  network. Say Y here if you want to do this; read the IPX-HOWTO at
  4.6363 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto> for details.
  4.6364 -
  4.6365 -  The full internal IPX network enables you to allocate sockets on
  4.6366 -  different virtual nodes of the internal network. This is done by
  4.6367 -  evaluating the field sipx_node of the socket address given to the
  4.6368 -  bind call. So applications should always initialize the node field
  4.6369 -  to 0 when binding a socket on the primary network. In this case the
  4.6370 -  socket is assigned the default node that has been given to the
  4.6371 -  kernel when the internal network was created. By enabling the full
  4.6372 -  internal IPX network the cross-forwarding of packets targeted at
  4.6373 -  'special' sockets to sockets listening on the primary network is
  4.6374 -  disabled. This might break existing applications, especially RIP/SAP
  4.6375 -  daemons. A RIP/SAP daemon that works well with the full internal net
  4.6376 -  can be found on <ftp://ftp.gwdg.de/pub/linux/misc/ncpfs/>.
  4.6377 -
  4.6378 -  If you don't know what you are doing, say N.
  4.6379 -
  4.6380 -#(We're told this will come back someday)
  4.6381 -
  4.6382 -SPX networking
  4.6383 -CONFIG_SPX
  4.6384 -  * Orphaned entry retained 20 April 2001 by Petr Vandrovec     *
  4.6385 -  * If you read this note from the configurator, please contact *
  4.6386 -  * the Configure.help maintainers.                             *
  4.6387 -  The Sequenced Packet eXchange protocol is a transport layer protocol
  4.6388 -  built on top of IPX. It is used in Novell NetWare systems for
  4.6389 -  client-server applications and is similar to TCP (which runs on top
  4.6390 -  of IP).
  4.6391 -
  4.6392 -  Note that Novell NetWare file sharing does not use SPX; it uses a
  4.6393 -  protocol called NCP, for which separate Linux support is available
  4.6394 -  ("NCP file system support" below for the client side, and the user
  4.6395 -  space programs lwared or mars_nwe for the server side).
  4.6396 -
  4.6397 -  Say Y here if you have use for SPX; read the IPX-HOWTO at
  4.6398 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto> for details.
  4.6399 -
  4.6400 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6401 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6402 -  The module will be called af_spx.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.6403 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.6404 -
  4.6405 -DECnet networking
  4.6406 -CONFIG_DECNET
  4.6407 -  The DECnet networking protocol was used in many products made by
  4.6408 -  Digital (now Compaq).  It provides reliable stream and sequenced
  4.6409 -  packet communications over which run a variety of services similar
  4.6410 -  to those which run over TCP/IP.
  4.6411 -
  4.6412 -  To find some tools to use with the kernel layer support, please
  4.6413 -  look at Patrick Caulfield's web site:
  4.6414 -  <http://linux.dreamtime.org/decnet/>.
  4.6415 -
  4.6416 -  More detailed documentation is available in
  4.6417 -  <file:Documentation/networking/decnet.txt>.
  4.6418 -
  4.6419 -  Be sure to say Y to "/proc file system support" and "Sysctl support"
  4.6420 -  below when using DECnet, since you will need sysctl support to aid
  4.6421 -  in configuration at run time.
  4.6422 -
  4.6423 -  The DECnet code is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6424 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6425 -  The module is called decnet.o.
  4.6426 -
  4.6427 -DECnet SIOCFIGCONF support
  4.6428 -CONFIG_DECNET_SIOCGIFCONF
  4.6429 -  This option should only be turned on if you are really sure that
  4.6430 -  you know what you are doing. It can break other applications which
  4.6431 -  use this system call and the proper way to get the information
  4.6432 -  provided by this call is to use rtnetlink.
  4.6433 -
  4.6434 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.6435 -
  4.6436 -DECnet router support
  4.6437 -CONFIG_DECNET_ROUTER
  4.6438 -  Add support for turning your DECnet Endnode into a level 1 or 2
  4.6439 -  router.  This is an unfinished option for developers only.  If you
  4.6440 -  do say Y here, then make sure that you also say Y to "Kernel/User
  4.6441 -  network link driver", "Routing messages" and "Network packet
  4.6442 -  filtering".  The first two are required to allow configuration via
  4.6443 -  rtnetlink (currently you need Alexey Kuznetsov's iproute2 package
  4.6444 -  from <ftp://ftp.inr.ac.ru/>). The "Network packet filtering" option
  4.6445 -  will be required for the forthcoming routing daemon to work.
  4.6446 -
  4.6447 -  See <file:Documentation/networking/decnet.txt> for more information.
  4.6448 -
  4.6449 -Use FWMARK value as DECnet routing key
  4.6450 -CONFIG_DECNET_ROUTE_FWMARK
  4.6451 -  If you say Y here, you will be able to specify different routes for
  4.6452 -  packets with different FWMARK ("firewalling mark") values
  4.6453 -  (see ipchains(8), "-m" argument).
  4.6454 -
  4.6455 -AppleTalk interfaces support
  4.6456 -CONFIG_DEV_APPLETALK
  4.6457 -  AppleTalk is the protocol that Apple computers can use to communicate
  4.6458 -  on a network.  If your Linux box is connected to such a network, and wish
  4.6459 -  to do IP over it, or you have a LocalTalk card and wish to use it to
  4.6460 -  connect to the AppleTalk network, say Y.
  4.6461 -
  4.6462 -AppleTalk protocol support
  4.6463 -CONFIG_ATALK
  4.6464 -  AppleTalk is the protocol that Apple computers can use to communicate
  4.6465 -  on a network.  If your Linux box is connected to such a network and you
  4.6466 -  wish to connect to it, say Y.  You will need to use the netatalk package
  4.6467 -  so that your Linux box can act as a print and file server for Macs as
  4.6468 -  well as access AppleTalk printers.  Check out
  4.6469 -  <http://www.zettabyte.net/netatalk/> on the WWW for details.
  4.6470 -  EtherTalk is the name used for AppleTalk over Ethernet and the
  4.6471 -  cheaper and slower LocalTalk is AppleTalk over a proprietary Apple
  4.6472 -  network using serial links.  EtherTalk and LocalTalk are fully
  4.6473 -  supported by Linux.
  4.6474 -
  4.6475 -  General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and
  4.6476 -  Macs is on the WWW at <http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html>.  The
  4.6477 -  NET-3-HOWTO, available from
  4.6478 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, contains valuable
  4.6479 -  information as well.
  4.6480 -
  4.6481 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6482 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6483 -  The module is called appletalk.o.  If you want to compile it as a
  4.6484 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  You
  4.6485 -  almost certainly want to compile it as a module so you can restart
  4.6486 -  your AppleTalk stack without rebooting your machine.  I hear that
  4.6487 -  the GNU boycott of Apple is over, so even politically correct people
  4.6488 -  are allowed to say Y here.
  4.6489 -
  4.6490 -AppleTalk-IP driver support
  4.6491 -CONFIG_IPDDP
  4.6492 -  This allows IP networking for users who only have AppleTalk
  4.6493 -  networking available. This feature is experimental. With this
  4.6494 -  driver, you can encapsulate IP inside AppleTalk (e.g. if your Linux
  4.6495 -  box is stuck on an AppleTalk only network) or decapsulate (e.g. if
  4.6496 -  you want your Linux box to act as an Internet gateway for a zoo of
  4.6497 -  AppleTalk connected Macs). Please see the file
  4.6498 -  <file:Documentation/networking/ipddp.txt> for more information.
  4.6499 -
  4.6500 -  If you say Y here, the AppleTalk-IP support will be compiled into
  4.6501 -  the kernel. In this case, you can either use encapsulation or
  4.6502 -  decapsulation, but not both. With the following two questions, you
  4.6503 -  decide which one you want.
  4.6504 -
  4.6505 -  If you say M here, the AppleTalk-IP support will be compiled as a
  4.6506 -  module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the
  4.6507 -  running kernel whenever you want, read
  4.6508 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>).  The module is called ipddp.o.
  4.6509 -  In this case, you will be able to use both encapsulation and
  4.6510 -  decapsulation simultaneously, by loading two copies of the module
  4.6511 -  and specifying different values for the module option ipddp_mode.
  4.6512 -
  4.6513 -IP to AppleTalk-IP Encapsulation support
  4.6514 -CONFIG_IPDDP_ENCAP
  4.6515 -  If you say Y here, the AppleTalk-IP code will be able to encapsulate
  4.6516 -  IP packets inside AppleTalk frames; this is useful if your Linux box
  4.6517 -  is stuck on an AppleTalk network (which hopefully contains a
  4.6518 -  decapsulator somewhere). Please see
  4.6519 -  <file:Documentation/networking/ipddp.txt> for more information. If
  4.6520 -  you said Y to "AppleTalk-IP driver support" above and you say Y
  4.6521 -  here, then you cannot say Y to "AppleTalk-IP to IP Decapsulation
  4.6522 -  support", below.
  4.6523 -
  4.6524 -AppleTalk-IP to IP Decapsulation support
  4.6525 -CONFIG_IPDDP_DECAP
  4.6526 -  If you say Y here, the AppleTalk-IP code will be able to decapsulate
  4.6527 -  AppleTalk-IP frames to IP packets; this is useful if you want your
  4.6528 -  Linux box to act as an Internet gateway for an AppleTalk network.
  4.6529 -  Please see <file:Documentation/networking/ipddp.txt> for more
  4.6530 -  information.  If you said Y to "AppleTalk-IP driver support" above
  4.6531 -  and you say Y here, then you cannot say Y to "IP to AppleTalk-IP
  4.6532 -  Encapsulation support", above.
  4.6533 -
  4.6534 -Apple/Farallon LocalTalk PC card support
  4.6535 -CONFIG_LTPC
  4.6536 -  This allows you to use the AppleTalk PC card to connect to LocalTalk
  4.6537 -  networks. The card is also known as the Farallon PhoneNet PC card.
  4.6538 -  If you are in doubt, this card is the one with the 65C02 chip on it.
  4.6539 -  You also need version 1.3.3 or later of the netatalk package.
  4.6540 -  This driver is experimental, which means that it may not work.
  4.6541 -  See the file <file:Documentation/networking/ltpc.txt>.
  4.6542 -
  4.6543 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6544 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6545 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.6546 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.6547 -  ltpc.o
  4.6548 -
  4.6549 -COPS LocalTalk PC card support
  4.6550 -CONFIG_COPS
  4.6551 -  This allows you to use COPS AppleTalk cards to connect to LocalTalk
  4.6552 -  networks. You also need version 1.3.3 or later of the netatalk
  4.6553 -  package. This driver is experimental, which means that it may not
  4.6554 -  work. This driver will only work if you choose "AppleTalk DDP"
  4.6555 -  networking support, above.
  4.6556 -  Please read the file <file:Documentation/networking/cops.txt>.
  4.6557 -
  4.6558 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6559 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6560 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.6561 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.6562 -  cops.o
  4.6563 -
  4.6564 -Dayna firmware support
  4.6565 -CONFIG_COPS_DAYNA
  4.6566 -  Support COPS compatible cards with Dayna style firmware (Dayna
  4.6567 -  DL2000/ Daynatalk/PC (half length), COPS LT-95, Farallon PhoneNET PC
  4.6568 -  III, Farallon PhoneNET PC II).
  4.6569 -
  4.6570 -Tangent firmware support
  4.6571 -CONFIG_COPS_TANGENT
  4.6572 -  Support COPS compatible cards with Tangent style firmware (Tangent
  4.6573 -  ATB_II, Novell NL-1000, Daystar Digital LT-200.
  4.6574 -
  4.6575 -Amateur Radio support
  4.6576 -CONFIG_HAMRADIO
  4.6577 -  If you want to connect your Linux box to an amateur radio, answer Y
  4.6578 -  here. You want to read <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html> and
  4.6579 -  the AX25-HOWTO, available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.6580 -
  4.6581 -  Note that the answer to this question won't directly affect the
  4.6582 -  kernel: saying N will just cause the configurator to skip all
  4.6583 -  the questions about amateur radio.
  4.6584 -
  4.6585 -Amateur Radio AX.25 Level 2 protocol
  4.6586 -CONFIG_AX25
  4.6587 -  This is the protocol used for computer communication over amateur
  4.6588 -  radio. It is either used by itself for point-to-point links, or to
  4.6589 -  carry other protocols such as tcp/ip. To use it, you need a device
  4.6590 -  that connects your Linux box to your amateur radio. You can either
  4.6591 -  use a low speed TNC (a Terminal Node Controller acts as a kind of
  4.6592 -  modem connecting your computer's serial port to your radio's
  4.6593 -  microphone input and speaker output) supporting the KISS protocol or
  4.6594 -  one of the various SCC cards that are supported by the generic Z8530
  4.6595 -  or the DMA SCC driver. Another option are the Baycom modem serial
  4.6596 -  and parallel port hacks or the sound card modem (supported by their
  4.6597 -  own drivers). If you say Y here, you also have to say Y to one of
  4.6598 -  those drivers.
  4.6599 -
  4.6600 -  Information about where to get supporting software for Linux amateur
  4.6601 -  radio as well as information about how to configure an AX.25 port is
  4.6602 -  contained in the AX25-HOWTO, available from
  4.6603 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You might also want to
  4.6604 -  check out the file <file:Documentation/networking/ax25.txt> in the
  4.6605 -  kernel source. More information about digital amateur radio in
  4.6606 -  general is on the WWW at
  4.6607 -  <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html>.
  4.6608 -
  4.6609 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6610 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6611 -  The module will be called ax25.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.6612 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.6613 -
  4.6614 -AX.25 DAMA Slave support
  4.6615 -CONFIG_AX25_DAMA_SLAVE
  4.6616 -  DAMA is a mechanism to prevent collisions when doing AX.25
  4.6617 -  networking. A DAMA server (called "master") accepts incoming traffic
  4.6618 -  from clients (called "slaves") and redistributes it to other slaves.
  4.6619 -  If you say Y here, your Linux box will act as a DAMA slave; this is
  4.6620 -  transparent in that you don't have to do any special DAMA
  4.6621 -  configuration. (Linux cannot yet act as a DAMA server.) If unsure,
  4.6622 -  say N.
  4.6623 -
  4.6624 -AX.25 DAMA Master support
  4.6625 -CONFIG_AX25_DAMA_MASTER
  4.6626 -  DAMA is a mechanism to prevent collisions when doing AX.25
  4.6627 -  networking. A DAMA server (called "master") accepts incoming traffic
  4.6628 -  from clients (called "slaves") and redistributes it to other
  4.6629 -  slaves. If you say Y here, your Linux box will act as a DAMA server.
  4.6630 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.6631 -
  4.6632 -Amateur Radio NET/ROM support
  4.6633 -CONFIG_NETROM
  4.6634 -  NET/ROM is a network layer protocol on top of AX.25 useful for
  4.6635 -  routing.
  4.6636 -
  4.6637 -  A comprehensive listing of all the software for Linux amateur radio
  4.6638 -  users as well as information about how to configure an AX.25 port is
  4.6639 -  contained in the AX25-HOWTO, available from
  4.6640 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You also might want to
  4.6641 -  check out the file <file:Documentation/networking/ax25.txt>. More
  4.6642 -  information about digital amateur radio in general is on the WWW at
  4.6643 -  <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html>.
  4.6644 -
  4.6645 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6646 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6647 -  The module will be called netrom.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.6648 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.6649 -
  4.6650 -Amateur Radio X.25 PLP (Rose)
  4.6651 -CONFIG_ROSE
  4.6652 -  The Packet Layer Protocol (PLP) is a way to route packets over X.25
  4.6653 -  connections in general and amateur radio AX.25 connections in
  4.6654 -  particular, essentially an alternative to NET/ROM.
  4.6655 -
  4.6656 -  A comprehensive listing of all the software for Linux amateur radio
  4.6657 -  users as well as information about how to configure an AX.25 port is
  4.6658 -  contained in the AX25-HOWTO, available from
  4.6659 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.  You also might want to
  4.6660 -  check out the file <file:Documentation/networking/ax25.txt>. More
  4.6661 -  information about digital amateur radio in general is on the WWW at
  4.6662 -  <http://www.tapr.org/tapr/html/pkthome.html>.
  4.6663 -
  4.6664 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6665 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.6666 -  The module will be called rose.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.6667 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.6668 -
  4.6669 -Serial port KISS driver for AX.25
  4.6670 -CONFIG_MKISS
  4.6671 -  KISS is a protocol used for the exchange of data between a computer
  4.6672 -  and a Terminal Node Controller (a small embedded system commonly
  4.6673 -  used for networking over AX.25 amateur radio connections; it
  4.6674 -  connects the computer's serial port with the radio's microphone
  4.6675 -  input and speaker output).
  4.6676 -
  4.6677 -  Although KISS is less advanced than the 6pack protocol, it has
  4.6678 -  the advantage that it is already supported by most modern TNCs
  4.6679 -  without the need for a firmware upgrade.
  4.6680 -
  4.6681 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6682 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6683 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.6684 -  will be called mkiss.o.
  4.6685 -
  4.6686 -Serial port 6PACK driver for AX.25
  4.6687 -CONFIG_6PACK
  4.6688 -  6pack is a transmission protocol for the data exchange between your
  4.6689 -  PC and your TNC (the Terminal Node Controller acts as a kind of
  4.6690 -  modem connecting your computer's serial port to your radio's
  4.6691 -  microphone input and speaker output). This protocol can be used as
  4.6692 -  an alternative to KISS for networking over AX.25 amateur radio
  4.6693 -  connections, but it has some extended functionality.
  4.6694 -
  4.6695 -  Note that this driver is still experimental and might cause
  4.6696 -  problems. For details about the features and the usage of the
  4.6697 -  driver, read <file:Documentation/networking/6pack.txt>.
  4.6698 -
  4.6699 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6700 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6701 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.6702 -  will be called 6pack.o.
  4.6703 -
  4.6704 -BPQ Ethernet driver
  4.6705 -CONFIG_BPQETHER
  4.6706 -  AX.25 is the protocol used for computer communication over amateur
  4.6707 -  radio. If you say Y here, you will be able to send and receive AX.25
  4.6708 -  traffic over Ethernet (also called "BPQ AX.25"), which could be
  4.6709 -  useful if some other computer on your local network has a direct
  4.6710 -  amateur radio connection.
  4.6711 -
  4.6712 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6713 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6714 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.6715 -  will be called bpqether.o.
  4.6716 -
  4.6717 -High-speed (DMA) SCC driver for AX.25
  4.6718 -CONFIG_DMASCC
  4.6719 -  This is a driver for high-speed SCC boards, i.e. those supporting
  4.6720 -  DMA on one port. You usually use those boards to connect your
  4.6721 -  computer to an amateur radio modem (such as the WA4DSY 56kbps
  4.6722 -  modem), in order to send and receive AX.25 packet radio network
  4.6723 -  traffic.
  4.6724 -
  4.6725 -  Currently, this driver supports Ottawa PI/PI2, Paccomm/Gracilis
  4.6726 -  PackeTwin, and S5SCC/DMA boards. They are detected automatically.
  4.6727 -  If you have one of these cards, say Y here and read the AX25-HOWTO,
  4.6728 -  available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.6729 -
  4.6730 -  This driver can operate multiple boards simultaneously. If you
  4.6731 -  compile it as a module (by saying M instead of Y), it will be called
  4.6732 -  dmascc.o. If you don't pass any parameter to the driver, all
  4.6733 -  possible I/O addresses are probed. This could irritate other devices
  4.6734 -  that are currently not in use. You may specify the list of addresses
  4.6735 -  to be probed by "dmascc=addr1,addr2,..." (when compiled into the
  4.6736 -  kernel image) or "io=addr1,addr2,..." (when loaded as a module). The
  4.6737 -  network interfaces will be called dmascc0 and dmascc1 for the board
  4.6738 -  detected first, dmascc2 and dmascc3 for the second one, and so on.
  4.6739 -
  4.6740 -  Before you configure each interface with ifconfig, you MUST set
  4.6741 -  certain parameters, such as channel access timing, clock mode, and
  4.6742 -  DMA channel. This is accomplished with a small utility program,
  4.6743 -  dmascc_cfg, available at
  4.6744 -  <http://www.nt.tuwien.ac.at/~kkudielk/Linux/>. Please be sure to get
  4.6745 -  at least version 1.27 of dmascc_cfg, as older versions will not
  4.6746 -  work with the current driver.
  4.6747 -
  4.6748 -Z8530 SCC driver for AX.25
  4.6749 -CONFIG_SCC
  4.6750 -  These cards are used to connect your Linux box to an amateur radio
  4.6751 -  in order to communicate with other computers. If you want to use
  4.6752 -  this, read <file:Documentation/networking/z8530drv.txt> and the
  4.6753 -  AX25-HOWTO, available from
  4.6754 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Also make sure to say Y
  4.6755 -  to "Amateur Radio AX.25 Level 2" support.
  4.6756 -
  4.6757 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6758 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6759 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.6760 -  will be called scc.o.
  4.6761 -
  4.6762 -Support for TRX that feedback the tx signal to rx
  4.6763 -CONFIG_SCC_TRXECHO
  4.6764 -  Some transmitters feed the transmitted signal back to the receive
  4.6765 -  line.  Say Y here to foil this by explicitly disabling the receiver
  4.6766 -  during data transmission.  If in doubt, say Y.
  4.6767 -
  4.6768 -Additional delay for PA0HZP OptoSCC compatible boards
  4.6769 -CONFIG_SCC_DELAY
  4.6770 -  Say Y here if you experience problems with the SCC driver not
  4.6771 -  working properly; please read
  4.6772 -  <file:Documentation/networking/z8530drv.txt> for details. If unsure,
  4.6773 -  say N.
  4.6774 -
  4.6775 -YAM driver for AX.25
  4.6776 -CONFIG_YAM
  4.6777 -  The YAM is a modem for packet radio which connects to the serial
  4.6778 -  port and includes some of the functions of a Terminal Node
  4.6779 -  Controller. If you have one of those, say Y here.
  4.6780 -
  4.6781 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6782 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6783 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.6784 -  will be called yam.o.
  4.6785 -
  4.6786 -BAYCOM picpar and par96 driver for AX.25
  4.6787 -CONFIG_BAYCOM_PAR
  4.6788 -  This is a driver for Baycom style simple amateur radio modems that
  4.6789 -  connect to a parallel interface. The driver supports the picpar and
  4.6790 -  par96 designs. To configure the driver, use the sethdlc utility
  4.6791 -  available in the standard ax25 utilities package. For information on
  4.6792 -  the modems, see <http://www.baycom.de/> and the file
  4.6793 -  <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
  4.6794 -
  4.6795 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6796 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6797 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  This is
  4.6798 -  recommended.  The module will be called baycom_par.o.
  4.6799 -
  4.6800 -BAYCOM EPP driver for AX.25
  4.6801 -CONFIG_BAYCOM_EPP
  4.6802 -  This is a driver for Baycom style simple amateur radio modems that
  4.6803 -  connect to a parallel interface. The driver supports the EPP
  4.6804 -  designs. To configure the driver, use the sethdlc utility available
  4.6805 -  in the standard ax25 utilities package. For information on the
  4.6806 -  modems, see <http://www.baycom.de/> and the file
  4.6807 -  <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
  4.6808 -
  4.6809 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6810 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6811 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  This is
  4.6812 -  recommended.  The module will be called baycom_par.o.
  4.6813 -
  4.6814 -BAYCOM ser12 full-duplex driver for AX.25
  4.6815 -CONFIG_BAYCOM_SER_FDX
  4.6816 -  This is one of two drivers for Baycom style simple amateur radio
  4.6817 -  modems that connect to a serial interface. The driver supports the
  4.6818 -  ser12 design in full-duplex mode. In addition, it allows the
  4.6819 -  baudrate to be set between 300 and 4800 baud (however not all modems
  4.6820 -  support all baudrates). This is the preferred driver. The next
  4.6821 -  driver, "BAYCOM ser12 half-duplex driver for AX.25" is the old
  4.6822 -  driver and still provided in case this driver does not work with
  4.6823 -  your serial interface chip. To configure the driver, use the sethdlc
  4.6824 -  utility available in the standard ax25 utilities package. For
  4.6825 -  information on the modems, see <http://www.baycom.de/> and
  4.6826 -  <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
  4.6827 -
  4.6828 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6829 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6830 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  This is
  4.6831 -  recommended.  The module will be called baycom_ser_fdx.o.
  4.6832 -
  4.6833 -BAYCOM ser12 half-duplex driver for AX.25
  4.6834 -CONFIG_BAYCOM_SER_HDX
  4.6835 -  This is one of two drivers for Baycom style simple amateur radio
  4.6836 -  modems that connect to a serial interface. The driver supports the
  4.6837 -  ser12 design in full-duplex mode. This is the old driver.  It is
  4.6838 -  still provided in case your serial interface chip does not work with
  4.6839 -  the full-duplex driver. This driver is depreciated.  To configure
  4.6840 -  the driver, use the sethdlc utility available in the standard ax25
  4.6841 -  utilities package. For information on the modems, see
  4.6842 -  <http://www.baycom.de/> and
  4.6843 -  <file:Documentation/networking/baycom.txt>.
  4.6844 -
  4.6845 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6846 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6847 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  This is
  4.6848 -  recommended.  The module will be called baycom_ser_hdx.o.
  4.6849 -
  4.6850 -Sound card modem driver for AX.25
  4.6851 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM
  4.6852 -  This experimental driver allows a standard Sound Blaster or
  4.6853 -  WindowsSoundSystem compatible sound card to be used as a packet
  4.6854 -  radio modem (NOT as a telephone modem!), to send digital traffic
  4.6855 -  over amateur radio.
  4.6856 -
  4.6857 -  To configure the driver, use the sethdlc, smdiag and smmixer
  4.6858 -  utilities available in the standard ax25 utilities package. For
  4.6859 -  information on how to key the transmitter, see
  4.6860 -  <http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/~sailer/pcf/ptt_circ/ptt.html> and
  4.6861 -  <file:Documentation/networking/soundmodem.txt>.
  4.6862 -
  4.6863 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6864 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6865 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  This is
  4.6866 -  recommended.  The module will be called soundmodem.o.
  4.6867 -
  4.6868 -Sound card modem support for Sound Blaster and compatible cards
  4.6869 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_SBC
  4.6870 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver to use Sound Blaster and
  4.6871 -  compatible cards. If you have a dual mode card (i.e. a WSS cards
  4.6872 -  with a Sound Blaster emulation) you should say N here and Y to
  4.6873 -  "Sound card modem support for WSS and Crystal cards", below, because
  4.6874 -  this usually results in better performance. This option also
  4.6875 -  supports SB16/32/64 in full-duplex mode.
  4.6876 -
  4.6877 -Sound card modem support for WSS and Crystal cards
  4.6878 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_WSS
  4.6879 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver to use WindowsSoundSystem
  4.6880 -  compatible cards. These cards feature a codec chip from either
  4.6881 -  Analog Devices (such as AD1848, AD1845, AD1812) or Crystal
  4.6882 -  Semiconductors (such as CS4248, CS423x). This option also supports
  4.6883 -  the WSS full-duplex operation which currently works with Crystal
  4.6884 -  CS423x chips. If you don't need full-duplex operation, do not enable
  4.6885 -  it to save performance.
  4.6886 -
  4.6887 -Sound card modem support for 1200 baud AFSK modulation
  4.6888 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK1200
  4.6889 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 1200 baud AFSK modem,
  4.6890 -  compatible to popular modems using TCM3105 or AM7911. The
  4.6891 -  demodulator requires about 12% of the CPU power of a Pentium 75 CPU
  4.6892 -  per channel.
  4.6893 -
  4.6894 -Sound card modem support for 2400 baud AFSK modulation (7.3728MHz crystal)
  4.6895 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK2400_7
  4.6896 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 2400 baud AFSK modem,
  4.6897 -  compatible to TCM3105 modems (over-)clocked with a 7.3728MHz
  4.6898 -  crystal. Note that the availability of this driver does _not_ imply
  4.6899 -  that I recommend building such links. It is only here since users
  4.6900 -  especially in eastern Europe have asked me to do so. In fact this
  4.6901 -  modulation scheme has many disadvantages, mainly its incompatibility
  4.6902 -  with many transceiver designs and the fact that the TCM3105 (if
  4.6903 -  used) is operated widely outside its specifications.
  4.6904 -
  4.6905 -Sound card modem support for 2400 baud AFSK modulation (8MHz crystal)
  4.6906 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK2400_8
  4.6907 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 2400 baud AFSK modem,
  4.6908 -  compatible to TCM3105 modems (over-)clocked with an 8MHz crystal.
  4.6909 -  Note that the availability of this driver does _not_ imply that I
  4.6910 -  recommend building such links. It is only here since users
  4.6911 -  especially in eastern Europe have asked me to do so. In fact this
  4.6912 -  modulation scheme has many disadvantages, mainly its incompatibility
  4.6913 -  with many transceiver designs and the fact that the TCM3105 (if
  4.6914 -  used) is operated widely outside its specifications.
  4.6915 -
  4.6916 -Sound card modem support for 2666 baud AFSK modulation
  4.6917 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_AFSK2666
  4.6918 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 2666 baud AFSK modem.
  4.6919 -  This modem is experimental, and not compatible to anything
  4.6920 -  else I know of.
  4.6921 -
  4.6922 -Sound card modem support for 4800 baud 8PSK modulation
  4.6923 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_PSK4800
  4.6924 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 4800 baud 8PSK modem.
  4.6925 -  This modem is experimental, and not compatible to anything
  4.6926 -  else I know of.
  4.6927 -
  4.6928 -Sound card modem support for 4800 baud HAPN-1 modulation
  4.6929 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_HAPN4800
  4.6930 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 4800 baud HAPN-1
  4.6931 -  compatible modem. This modulation seems to be widely used 'down
  4.6932 -  under' and in the Netherlands. Here, nobody uses it, so I could not
  4.6933 -  test if it works. It is compatible to itself, however :-)
  4.6934 -
  4.6935 -Sound card modem support for 9600 baud FSK G3RUH modulation
  4.6936 -CONFIG_SOUNDMODEM_FSK9600
  4.6937 -  This option enables the soundmodem driver 9600 baud FSK modem,
  4.6938 -  compatible to the G3RUH standard. The demodulator requires about 4%
  4.6939 -  of the CPU power of a Pentium 75 CPU per channel. You can say Y to
  4.6940 -  both 1200 baud AFSK and 9600 baud FSK if you want (but obviously you
  4.6941 -  can only use one protocol at a time, depending on what the other end
  4.6942 -  can understand).
  4.6943 -
  4.6944 -CCITT X.25 Packet Layer
  4.6945 -CONFIG_X25
  4.6946 -  X.25 is a set of standardized network protocols, similar in scope to
  4.6947 -  frame relay; the one physical line from your box to the X.25 network
  4.6948 -  entry point can carry several logical point-to-point connections
  4.6949 -  (called "virtual circuits") to other computers connected to the X.25
  4.6950 -  network. Governments, banks, and other organizations tend to use it
  4.6951 -  to connect to each other or to form Wide Area Networks (WANs). Many
  4.6952 -  countries have public X.25 networks. X.25 consists of two
  4.6953 -  protocols: the higher level Packet Layer Protocol (PLP) (say Y here
  4.6954 -  if you want that) and the lower level data link layer protocol LAPB
  4.6955 -  (say Y to "LAPB Data Link Driver" below if you want that).
  4.6956 -
  4.6957 -  You can read more about X.25 at <http://www.sangoma.com/x25.htm> and
  4.6958 -  <http://www.cisco.com/univercd/data/doc/software/11_0/rpcg/cx25.htm>.
  4.6959 -  Information about X.25 for Linux is contained in the files
  4.6960 -  <file:Documentation/networking/x25.txt> and
  4.6961 -  <file:Documentation/networking/x25-iface.txt>.
  4.6962 -
  4.6963 -  One connects to an X.25 network either with a dedicated network card
  4.6964 -  using the X.21 protocol (not yet supported by Linux) or one can do
  4.6965 -  X.25 over a standard telephone line using an ordinary modem (say Y
  4.6966 -  to "X.25 async driver" below) or over Ethernet using an ordinary
  4.6967 -  Ethernet card and either the 802.2 LLC protocol (say Y to "802.2
  4.6968 -  LLC" below) or LAPB over Ethernet (say Y to "LAPB Data Link Driver"
  4.6969 -  and "LAPB over Ethernet driver" below).
  4.6970 -
  4.6971 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.6972 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.6973 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.6974 -  will be called x25.o. If unsure, say N.
  4.6975 -
  4.6976 -LAPB Data Link Driver
  4.6977 -CONFIG_LAPB
  4.6978 -  Link Access Procedure, Balanced (LAPB) is the data link layer (i.e.
  4.6979 -  the lower) part of the X.25 protocol. It offers a reliable
  4.6980 -  connection service to exchange data frames with one other host, and
  4.6981 -  it is used to transport higher level protocols (mostly X.25 Packet
  4.6982 -  Layer, the higher part of X.25, but others are possible as well).
  4.6983 -  Usually, LAPB is used with specialized X.21 network cards, but Linux
  4.6984 -  currently supports LAPB only over Ethernet connections. If you want
  4.6985 -  to use LAPB connections over Ethernet, say Y here and to "LAPB over
  4.6986 -  Ethernet driver" below. Read
  4.6987 -  <file:Documentation/networking/lapb-module.txt> for technical
  4.6988 -  details.
  4.6989 -
  4.6990 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module though ( = code which
  4.6991 -  can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you
  4.6992 -  want), say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The
  4.6993 -  module will be called lapb.o.  If unsure, say N.
  4.6994 -
  4.6995 -802.2 LLC
  4.6996 -CONFIG_LLC
  4.6997 -  This is a Logical Link Layer protocol used for X.25 connections over
  4.6998 -  Ethernet, using ordinary Ethernet cards.
  4.6999 -
  4.7000 -Frame Diverter
  4.7001 -CONFIG_NET_DIVERT
  4.7002 -  The Frame Diverter allows you to divert packets from the
  4.7003 -  network, that are not aimed at the interface receiving it (in
  4.7004 -  promisc. mode). Typically, a Linux box setup as an Ethernet bridge
  4.7005 -  with the Frames Diverter on, can do some *really* transparent www
  4.7006 -  caching using a Squid proxy for example.
  4.7007 -
  4.7008 -  This is very useful when you don't want to change your router's
  4.7009 -  config (or if you simply don't have access to it).
  4.7010 -
  4.7011 -  The other possible usages of diverting Ethernet Frames are
  4.7012 -  numberous:
  4.7013 -   - reroute smtp traffic to another interface
  4.7014 -   - traffic-shape certain network streams
  4.7015 -   - transparently proxy smtp connections
  4.7016 -   - etc...
  4.7017 -
  4.7018 -  For more informations, please refer to:
  4.7019 -    <http://diverter.sourceforge.net/>
  4.7020 -    <http://perso.wanadoo.fr/magpie/EtherDivert.html>
  4.7021 -
  4.7022 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.7023 -
  4.7024 -802.1d Ethernet Bridging
  4.7025 -CONFIG_BRIDGE
  4.7026 -  If you say Y here, then your Linux box will be able to act as an
  4.7027 -  Ethernet bridge, which means that the different Ethernet segments it
  4.7028 -  is connected to will appear as one Ethernet to the participants.
  4.7029 -  Several such bridges can work together to create even larger
  4.7030 -  networks of Ethernets using the IEEE 802.1 spanning tree algorithm.
  4.7031 -  As this is a standard, Linux bridges will cooperate properly with
  4.7032 -  other third party bridge products.
  4.7033 -
  4.7034 -  In order to use the Ethernet bridge, you'll need the bridge
  4.7035 -  configuration tools; see <file:Documentation/networking/bridge.txt>
  4.7036 -  for location. Please read the Bridge mini-HOWTO for more
  4.7037 -  information.
  4.7038 -
  4.7039 -  Note that if your box acts as a bridge, it probably contains several
  4.7040 -  Ethernet devices, but the kernel is not able to recognize more than
  4.7041 -  one at boot time without help; for details read the Ethernet-HOWTO,
  4.7042 -  available from in <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.
  4.7043 -
  4.7044 -  If you want to compile this code as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7045 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.7046 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.7047 -  will be called bridge.o.
  4.7048 -
  4.7049 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.7050 -
  4.7051 -Packet socket
  4.7052 -CONFIG_PACKET
  4.7053 -  The Packet protocol is used by applications which communicate
  4.7054 -  directly with network devices without an intermediate network
  4.7055 -  protocol implemented in the kernel, e.g. tcpdump.  If you want them
  4.7056 -  to work, choose Y.
  4.7057 -
  4.7058 -  This driver is also available as a module called af_packet.o ( =
  4.7059 -  code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel
  4.7060 -  whenever you want).  If you want to compile it as a module, say M
  4.7061 -  here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>; if you use modprobe
  4.7062 -  or kmod, you may also want to add "alias net-pf-17 af_packet" to
  4.7063 -  /etc/modules.conf.
  4.7064 -
  4.7065 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.7066 -
  4.7067 -Packet socket: mmapped IO
  4.7068 -CONFIG_PACKET_MMAP
  4.7069 -  If you say Y here, the Packet protocol driver can use a faster and 
  4.7070 -  more efficient capture method. This feature also allows bigger 
  4.7071 -  receive buffers. To take advantage of this method who have to use 
  4.7072 -  a libpcap library that supports it. For more info see
  4.7073 -  <file:Documentation/networking/packet_mmap.txt>.
  4.7074 -
  4.7075 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.7076 -
  4.7077 -Netlink device emulation
  4.7078 -CONFIG_NETLINK_DEV
  4.7079 -  This option will be removed soon. Any programs that want to use
  4.7080 -  character special nodes like /dev/tap0 or /dev/route (all with major
  4.7081 -  number 36) need this option, and need to be rewritten soon to use
  4.7082 -  the real netlink socket.
  4.7083 -  This is a backward compatibility option, choose Y for now.
  4.7084 -
  4.7085 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7086 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7087 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7088 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.7089 -  netlink_dev.o
  4.7090 -
  4.7091 -Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
  4.7092 -CONFIG_ATM
  4.7093 -  ATM is a high-speed networking technology for Local Area Networks
  4.7094 -  and Wide Area Networks.  It uses a fixed packet size and is
  4.7095 -  connection oriented, allowing for the negotiation of minimum
  4.7096 -  bandwidth requirements.
  4.7097 -
  4.7098 -  In order to participate in an ATM network, your Linux box needs an
  4.7099 -  ATM networking card. If you have that, say Y here and to the driver
  4.7100 -  of your ATM card below.
  4.7101 -
  4.7102 -  Note that you need a set of user-space programs to actually make use
  4.7103 -  of ATM.  See the file <file:Documentation/networking/atm.txt> for
  4.7104 -  further details.
  4.7105 -
  4.7106 -Classical IP over ATM
  4.7107 -CONFIG_ATM_CLIP
  4.7108 -  Classical IP over ATM for PVCs and SVCs, supporting InARP and
  4.7109 -  ATMARP. If you want to communication with other IP hosts on your ATM
  4.7110 -  network, you will typically either say Y here or to "LAN Emulation
  4.7111 -  (LANE)" below.
  4.7112 -
  4.7113 -Do NOT send ICMP if no neighbour
  4.7114 -CONFIG_ATM_CLIP_NO_ICMP
  4.7115 -  Normally, an "ICMP host unreachable" message is sent if a neighbour
  4.7116 -  cannot be reached because there is no VC to it in the kernel's
  4.7117 -  ATMARP table. This may cause problems when ATMARP table entries are
  4.7118 -  briefly removed during revalidation. If you say Y here, packets to
  4.7119 -  such neighbours are silently discarded instead.
  4.7120 -
  4.7121 -RFC1483/2684 Bridged protocols
  4.7122 -CONFIG_ATM_BR2684
  4.7123 -  ATM PVCs can carry ethernet PDUs according to rfc2684 (formerly 1483)
  4.7124 -  This device will act like an ethernet from the kernels point of view,
  4.7125 -  with the traffic being carried by ATM PVCs (currently 1 PVC/device).
  4.7126 -  This is sometimes used over DSL lines.  If in doubt, say N.
  4.7127 -
  4.7128 -Per-VC IP filter kludge
  4.7129 -CONFIG_ATM_BR2684_IPFILTER
  4.7130 -  This is an experimental mechanism for users who need to terminating a
  4.7131 -  large number of IP-only vcc's.  Do not enable this unless you are sure
  4.7132 -  you know what you are doing.
  4.7133 -
  4.7134 -LAN Emulation (LANE) support
  4.7135 -CONFIG_ATM_LANE
  4.7136 -  LAN Emulation emulates services of existing LANs across an ATM
  4.7137 -  network. Besides operating as a normal ATM end station client, Linux
  4.7138 -  LANE client can also act as an proxy client bridging packets between
  4.7139 -  ELAN and Ethernet segments. You need LANE if you want to try MPOA.
  4.7140 -
  4.7141 -Multi-Protocol Over ATM (MPOA) support
  4.7142 -CONFIG_ATM_MPOA
  4.7143 -  Multi-Protocol Over ATM allows ATM edge devices such as routers,
  4.7144 -  bridges and ATM attached hosts establish direct ATM VCs across
  4.7145 -  subnetwork boundaries. These shortcut connections bypass routers
  4.7146 -  enhancing overall network performance.
  4.7147 -
  4.7148 -ATM over TCP
  4.7149 -CONFIG_ATM_TCP
  4.7150 -  ATM over TCP driver. Useful mainly for development and for
  4.7151 -  experiments. If unsure, say N.
  4.7152 -
  4.7153 -Efficient Networks ENI155P
  4.7154 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI
  4.7155 -  Driver for the Efficient Networks ENI155p series and SMC ATM
  4.7156 -  Power155 155 Mbps ATM adapters. Both, the versions with 512KB and
  4.7157 -  2MB on-board RAM (Efficient calls them "C" and "S", respectively),
  4.7158 -  and the FPGA and the ASIC Tonga versions of the board are supported.
  4.7159 -  The driver works with MMF (-MF or ...F) and UTP-5 (-U5 or ...D)
  4.7160 -  adapters.
  4.7161 -
  4.7162 -  This driver is also available as a module.  If you want to compile
  4.7163 -  it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7164 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called eni.o.
  4.7165 -
  4.7166 -Enable extended debugging
  4.7167 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_DEBUG
  4.7168 -  Extended debugging records various events and displays that list
  4.7169 -  when an inconsistency is detected. This mechanism is faster than
  4.7170 -  generally using printks, but still has some impact on performance.
  4.7171 -  Note that extended debugging may create certain race conditions
  4.7172 -  itself. Enable this ONLY if you suspect problems with the driver.
  4.7173 -
  4.7174 -Fine-tune burst settings
  4.7175 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_TUNE_BURST
  4.7176 -  In order to obtain good throughput, the ENI NIC can transfer
  4.7177 -  multiple words of data per PCI bus access cycle. Such a multi-word
  4.7178 -  transfer is called a burst.
  4.7179 -
  4.7180 -  The default settings for the burst sizes are suitable for most PCI
  4.7181 -  chipsets. However, in some cases, large bursts may overrun buffers
  4.7182 -  in the PCI chipset and cause data corruption. In such cases, large
  4.7183 -  bursts must be disabled and only (slower) small bursts can be used.
  4.7184 -  The burst sizes can be set independently in the send (TX) and
  4.7185 -  receive (RX) direction.
  4.7186 -
  4.7187 -  Note that enabling many different burst sizes in the same direction
  4.7188 -  may increase the cost of setting up a transfer such that the
  4.7189 -  resulting throughput is lower than when using only the largest
  4.7190 -  available burst size.
  4.7191 -
  4.7192 -  Also, sometimes larger bursts lead to lower throughput, e.g. on an
  4.7193 -  Intel 440FX board, a drop from 135 Mbps to 103 Mbps was observed
  4.7194 -  when going from 8W to 16W bursts.
  4.7195 -
  4.7196 -Enable 16W TX bursts (discouraged)
  4.7197 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_16W
  4.7198 -  Burst sixteen words at once in the send direction. This may work
  4.7199 -  with recent PCI chipsets, but is known to fail with older chipsets.
  4.7200 -
  4.7201 -Enable 8W TX bursts (recommended)
  4.7202 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_8W
  4.7203 -  Burst eight words at once in the send direction. This is the default
  4.7204 -  setting.
  4.7205 -
  4.7206 -Enable 4W TX bursts (optional)
  4.7207 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_4W
  4.7208 -  Burst four words at once in the send direction. You may want to try
  4.7209 -  this if you have disabled 8W bursts. Enabling 4W if 8W is also set
  4.7210 -  may or may not improve throughput.
  4.7211 -
  4.7212 -Enable 2W TX bursts (optional)
  4.7213 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_TX_2W
  4.7214 -  Burst two words at once in the send direction. You may want to try
  4.7215 -  this if you have disabled 4W and 8W bursts. Enabling 2W if 4W or 8W
  4.7216 -  are also set may or may not improve throughput.
  4.7217 -
  4.7218 -Enable 16W RX bursts (discouraged)
  4.7219 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_16W
  4.7220 -  Burst sixteen words at once in the receive direction. This may work
  4.7221 -  with recent PCI chipsets, but is known to fail with older chipsets.
  4.7222 -
  4.7223 -Enable 8W RX bursts (discouraged)
  4.7224 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_8W
  4.7225 -  Burst eight words at once in the receive direction. This may work
  4.7226 -  with recent PCI chipsets, but is known to fail with older chipsets,
  4.7227 -  such as the Intel Neptune series.
  4.7228 -
  4.7229 -Enable 4W RX bursts (recommended)
  4.7230 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_4W
  4.7231 -  Burst four words at once in the receive direction. This is the
  4.7232 -  default setting. Enabling 4W if 8W is also set may or may not
  4.7233 -  improve throughput.
  4.7234 -
  4.7235 -Enable 2W RX bursts (optional)
  4.7236 -CONFIG_ATM_ENI_BURST_RX_2W
  4.7237 -  Burst two words at once in the receive direction. You may want to
  4.7238 -  try this if you have disabled 4W and 8W bursts. Enabling 2W if 4W or
  4.7239 -  8W are also set may or may not improve throughput.
  4.7240 -
  4.7241 -ZeitNet ZN1221/ZN1225
  4.7242 -CONFIG_ATM_ZATM
  4.7243 -  Driver for the ZeitNet ZN1221 (MMF) and ZN1225 (UTP-5) 155 Mbps ATM
  4.7244 -  adapters.
  4.7245 -
  4.7246 -  This driver is also available as a module.  If you want to compile
  4.7247 -  it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7248 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called zatm.o.
  4.7249 -
  4.7250 -Enable extended debugging
  4.7251 -CONFIG_ATM_ZATM_DEBUG
  4.7252 -  Extended debugging records various events and displays that list
  4.7253 -  when an inconsistency is detected. This mechanism is faster than
  4.7254 -  generally using printks, but still has some impact on performance.
  4.7255 -  Note that extended debugging may create certain race conditions
  4.7256 -  itself. Enable this ONLY if you suspect problems with the driver.
  4.7257 -
  4.7258 -Fujitsu FireStream (FS50/FS155)
  4.7259 -CONFIG_ATM_FIRESTREAM
  4.7260 -  Driver for the Fujitsu FireStream 155 (MB86697) and
  4.7261 -  FireStream 50 (MB86695) ATM PCI chips.
  4.7262 -
  4.7263 -  This driver is also available as a module.  If you want to compile
  4.7264 -  it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7265 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.7266 -  firestream.o.
  4.7267 -
  4.7268 -Enable usec resolution timestamps
  4.7269 -CONFIG_ATM_ZATM_EXACT_TS
  4.7270 -  The uPD98401 SAR chip supports a high-resolution timer (approx. 30
  4.7271 -  MHz) that is used for very accurate reception timestamps. Because
  4.7272 -  that timer overflows after 140 seconds, and also to avoid timer
  4.7273 -  drift, time measurements need to be periodically synchronized with
  4.7274 -  the normal system time. Enabling this feature will add some general
  4.7275 -  overhead for timer synchronization and also per-packet overhead for
  4.7276 -  time conversion.
  4.7277 -
  4.7278 -IDT 77201/11 (NICStAR) (ForeRunnerLE)
  4.7279 -CONFIG_ATM_NICSTAR
  4.7280 -  The NICStAR chipset family is used in a large number of ATM NICs for
  4.7281 -  25 and for 155 Mbps, including IDT cards and the Fore ForeRunnerLE
  4.7282 -  series. Say Y if you have one of those.
  4.7283 -
  4.7284 -  This driver is also available as a module.  If you want to compile
  4.7285 -  it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7286 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.7287 -  nicstar.o.
  4.7288 -
  4.7289 -Use suni PHY driver (155Mbps)
  4.7290 -CONFIG_ATM_NICSTAR_USE_SUNI
  4.7291 -  Support for the S-UNI and compatible PHYsical layer chips. These are
  4.7292 -  found in most 155Mbps NICStAR based ATM cards, namely in the
  4.7293 -  ForeRunner LE155 cards. This driver provides detection of cable~
  4.7294 -  removal and reinsertion and provides some statistics. This driver
  4.7295 -  doesn't have removal capability when compiled as a module, so if you
  4.7296 -  need that capability don't include S-UNI support (it's not needed to
  4.7297 -  make the card work).
  4.7298 -
  4.7299 -Use IDT77015 PHY driver (25Mbps)
  4.7300 -CONFIG_ATM_NICSTAR_USE_IDT77105
  4.7301 -  Support for the PHYsical layer chip in ForeRunner LE25 cards. In
  4.7302 -  addition to cable removal/reinsertion detection, this driver allows
  4.7303 -  you to control the loopback mode of the chip via a dedicated IOCTL.
  4.7304 -  This driver is required for proper handling of temporary carrier
  4.7305 -  loss, so if you have a 25Mbps NICStAR based ATM card you must say Y.
  4.7306 -
  4.7307 -IDT 77252 (NICStAR II)
  4.7308 -CONFIG_ATM_IDT77252
  4.7309 -  Driver for the IDT 77252 ATM PCI chips.
  4.7310 -
  4.7311 -  This driver is also available as a module.  If you want to compile
  4.7312 -  it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7313 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called idt77252.o
  4.7314 -
  4.7315 -Enable debugging messages
  4.7316 -CONFIG_ATM_IDT77252_DEBUG
  4.7317 -  Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
  4.7318 -  messages is controlled by a bitmap.  This may be specified as a
  4.7319 -  module argument.  See the file <file:drivers/atm/idt77252.h> for
  4.7320 -  the meanings of the bits in the mask.
  4.7321 -
  4.7322 -  When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
  4.7323 -  speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
  4.7324 -  inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
  4.7325 -
  4.7326 -Receive ALL cells in raw queue
  4.7327 -CONFIG_ATM_IDT77252_RCV_ALL
  4.7328 -  Enable receiving of all cells on the ATM link, that do not match
  4.7329 -  an open connection in the raw cell queue of the driver.  Useful
  4.7330 -  for debugging or special applications only, so the safe answer is N.
  4.7331 -
  4.7332 -Madge Ambassador (Collage PCI 155 Server)
  4.7333 -CONFIG_ATM_AMBASSADOR
  4.7334 -  This is a driver for ATMizer based ATM card produced by Madge
  4.7335 -  Networks Ltd. Say Y (or M to compile as a module named ambassador.o)
  4.7336 -  here if you have one of these cards.
  4.7337 -
  4.7338 -Enable debugging messages
  4.7339 -CONFIG_ATM_AMBASSADOR_DEBUG
  4.7340 -  Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
  4.7341 -  messages is controlled by a bitmap.  This may be specified as a
  4.7342 -  module argument (kernel command line argument as well?), changed
  4.7343 -  dynamically using an ioctl (not yet) or changed by sending the
  4.7344 -  string "Dxxxx" to VCI 1023 (where x is a hex digit).  See the file
  4.7345 -  <file:drivers/atm/ambassador.h> for the meanings of the bits in the
  4.7346 -  mask.
  4.7347 -
  4.7348 -  When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
  4.7349 -  speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
  4.7350 -  inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
  4.7351 -
  4.7352 -Madge Horizon [Ultra] (Collage PCI 25 and Collage PCI 155 Client)
  4.7353 -CONFIG_ATM_HORIZON
  4.7354 -  This is a driver for the Horizon chipset ATM adapter cards once
  4.7355 -  produced by Madge Networks Ltd. Say Y (or M to compile as a module
  4.7356 -  named horizon.o) here if you have one of these cards.
  4.7357 -
  4.7358 -Enable debugging messages
  4.7359 -CONFIG_ATM_HORIZON_DEBUG
  4.7360 -  Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
  4.7361 -  messages is controlled by a bitmap.  This may be specified as a
  4.7362 -  module argument (kernel command line argument as well?), changed
  4.7363 -  dynamically using an ioctl (not yet) or changed by sending the
  4.7364 -  string "Dxxxx" to VCI 1023 (where x is a hex digit).  See the file
  4.7365 -  <file:drivers/atm/horizon.h> for the meanings of the bits in the
  4.7366 -  mask.
  4.7367 -
  4.7368 -  When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
  4.7369 -  speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
  4.7370 -  inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
  4.7371 -
  4.7372 -Interphase ATM PCI x575/x525/x531
  4.7373 -CONFIG_ATM_IA
  4.7374 -  This is a driver for the Interphase (i)ChipSAR adapter cards
  4.7375 -  which include a variety of variants in term of the size of the
  4.7376 -  control memory (128K-1KVC, 512K-4KVC), the size of the packet
  4.7377 -  memory (128K, 512K, 1M), and the PHY type (Single/Multi mode OC3,
  4.7378 -  UTP155, UTP25, DS3 and E3). Go to:
  4.7379 -  	<http://www.iphase.com/products/ClassSheet.cfm?ClassID=ATM>
  4.7380 -  for more info about the cards. Say Y (or M to compile as a module
  4.7381 -  named iphase.o) here if you have one of these cards.
  4.7382 -
  4.7383 -  See the file <file:Documentation/networking/iphase.txt> for further
  4.7384 -  details.
  4.7385 -
  4.7386 -Enable debugging messages
  4.7387 -CONFIG_ATM_IA_DEBUG
  4.7388 -  Somewhat useful debugging messages are available. The choice of
  4.7389 -  messages is controlled by a bitmap. This may be specified as a
  4.7390 -  module argument (kernel command line argument as well?), changed
  4.7391 -  dynamically using an ioctl (Get the debug utility, iadbg, from
  4.7392 -  <ftp://ftp.iphase.com/pub/atm/pci/>).
  4.7393 -
  4.7394 -  See the file <file:drivers/atm/iphase.h> for the meanings of the
  4.7395 -  bits in the mask.
  4.7396 -
  4.7397 -  When active, these messages can have a significant impact on the
  4.7398 -  speed of the driver, and the size of your syslog files! When
  4.7399 -  inactive, they will have only a modest impact on performance.
  4.7400 -
  4.7401 -Efficient Networks Speedstream 3010
  4.7402 -CONFIG_ATM_LANAI
  4.7403 -  Supports ATM cards based on the Efficient Networks "Lanai"
  4.7404 -  chipset such as the Speedstream 3010 and the ENI-25p.  The
  4.7405 -  Speedstream 3060 is currently not supported since we don't
  4.7406 -  have the code to drive the on-board Alcatel DSL chipset (yet).
  4.7407 -
  4.7408 -Linux telephony support
  4.7409 -CONFIG_PHONE
  4.7410 -  Say Y here if you have a telephony card, which for example allows
  4.7411 -  you to use a regular phone for voice-over-IP applications.
  4.7412 -
  4.7413 -  Note: this has nothing to do with modems.  You do not need to say Y
  4.7414 -  here in order to be able to use a modem under Linux.
  4.7415 -
  4.7416 -  This support is also available as a module.  If you want to compile
  4.7417 -  it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7418 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.7419 -  phonedev.o.
  4.7420 -
  4.7421 -Compaq Smart Array support
  4.7422 -CONFIG_BLK_CPQ_CISS_DA
  4.7423 -  This is the driver for Compaq Smart Array 5xxx controllers.
  4.7424 -  Everyone using these boards should say Y here.
  4.7425 -  See <file:Documentation/cciss.txt> for the current list of
  4.7426 -  boards supported by this driver, and for further information
  4.7427 -  on the use of this driver.
  4.7428 -
  4.7429 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7430 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7431 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7432 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>. The module will be called
  4.7433 -  cciss.o
  4.7434 -
  4.7435 -SCSI tape drive support for Smart Array 5xxx
  4.7436 -CONFIG_CISS_SCSI_TAPE
  4.7437 -  When enabled (Y), this option allows SCSI tape drives and SCSI medium
  4.7438 -  changers (tape robots) to be accessed via a Compaq 5xxx array
  4.7439 -  controller.  (See <file:Documentation/cciss.txt> for more details.)
  4.7440 -
  4.7441 -  "SCSI support" and "SCSI tape support" must also be enabled for this
  4.7442 -  option to work.
  4.7443 -
  4.7444 -  When this option is disabled (N), the SCSI portion of the driver
  4.7445 -  is not compiled.
  4.7446 -
  4.7447 -Enable monitor thread
  4.7448 -CONFIG_CISS_MONITOR_THREAD
  4.7449 -  Intended for use with multipath configurations (see the md driver).
  4.7450 -  This option allows a per-adapter monitoring thread to periodically
  4.7451 -  poll the adapter to detect failure modes in which the processor
  4.7452 -  is unable to receive interrupts from the adapter, thus enabling 
  4.7453 -  fail-over to an alternate adapter in such situations.  See 
  4.7454 -  <file:Documentation/cciss.txt> for more details.
  4.7455 -
  4.7456 -QuickNet Internet LineJack/PhoneJack support
  4.7457 -CONFIG_PHONE_IXJ
  4.7458 -  Say M if you have a telephony card manufactured by Quicknet
  4.7459 -  Technologies, Inc.  These include the Internet PhoneJACK and
  4.7460 -  Internet LineJACK Telephony Cards. You will get a module called
  4.7461 -  ixj.o.
  4.7462 -
  4.7463 -  For the ISA versions of these products, you can configure the
  4.7464 -  cards using the isapnp tools (pnpdump/isapnp) or you can use the
  4.7465 -  isapnp support.  Please read <file:Documentation/telephony/ixj.txt>.
  4.7466 -
  4.7467 -  For more information on these cards, see Quicknet's web site at:
  4.7468 -  <http://www.quicknet.net/>.
  4.7469 -
  4.7470 -  If you do not have any Quicknet telephony cards, you can safely
  4.7471 -  say N here.
  4.7472 -
  4.7473 -QuickNet Internet LineJack/PhoneJack PCMCIA support
  4.7474 -CONFIG_PHONE_IXJ_PCMCIA
  4.7475 -  Say Y here to configure in PCMCIA service support for the Quicknet
  4.7476 -  cards manufactured by Quicknet Technologies, Inc.  This builds an
  4.7477 -  additional support module for the PCMCIA version of the card.
  4.7478 -
  4.7479 -FORE Systems 200E-series
  4.7480 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_MAYBE
  4.7481 -  This is a driver for the FORE Systems 200E-series ATM adapter
  4.7482 -  cards. It simultaneously supports PCA-200E and SBA-200E models
  4.7483 -  on PCI and SBUS hosts. Say Y (or M to compile as a module
  4.7484 -  named fore_200e.o) here if you have one of these ATM adapters.
  4.7485 -
  4.7486 -  Note that the driver will actually be compiled only if you
  4.7487 -  additionally enable the support for PCA-200E and/or SBA-200E
  4.7488 -  cards.
  4.7489 -
  4.7490 -  See the file <file:Documentation/networking/fore200e.txt> for
  4.7491 -  further details.
  4.7492 -
  4.7493 -Enable PCA-200E card support on PCI-based hosts
  4.7494 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_PCA
  4.7495 -  Say Y here if you want your PCA-200E cards to be probed.
  4.7496 -
  4.7497 -Use default PCA-200E firmware
  4.7498 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_PCA_DEFAULT_FW
  4.7499 -  Use the default PCA-200E firmware data shipped with the driver.
  4.7500 -
  4.7501 -  Normal users do not have to deal with the firmware stuff, so
  4.7502 -  they should say Y here.
  4.7503 -
  4.7504 -Pathname of user-supplied binary firmware
  4.7505 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_PCA_FW
  4.7506 -  This defines the pathname of an alternative PCA-200E binary
  4.7507 -  firmware image supplied by the user. This pathname may be
  4.7508 -  absolute or relative to the drivers/atm directory.
  4.7509 -
  4.7510 -  The driver comes with an adequate firmware image, so normal users do
  4.7511 -  not have to supply an alternative one. They just say Y to "Use
  4.7512 -  default PCA-200E firmware" instead.
  4.7513 -
  4.7514 -Enable SBA-200E card support on SBUS-based hosts
  4.7515 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_SBA
  4.7516 -  Say Y here if you want your SBA-200E cards to be probed.
  4.7517 -
  4.7518 -Use default SBA-200E firmware
  4.7519 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_SBA_DEFAULT_FW
  4.7520 -  Use the default SBA-200E firmware data shipped with the driver.
  4.7521 -
  4.7522 -  Normal users do not have to deal with the firmware stuff, so
  4.7523 -  they should say Y here.
  4.7524 -
  4.7525 -Pathname of user-supplied binary firmware
  4.7526 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_SBA_FW
  4.7527 -  This defines the pathname of an alternative SBA-200E binary
  4.7528 -  firmware image supplied by the user. This pathname may be
  4.7529 -  absolute or relative to the drivers/atm directory.
  4.7530 -
  4.7531 -  The driver comes with an adequate firmware image, so normal users do
  4.7532 -  not have to supply an alternative one. They just say Y to "Use
  4.7533 -  default SBA-200E firmware", above.
  4.7534 -
  4.7535 -Maximum number of tx retries
  4.7536 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_TX_RETRY
  4.7537 -  Specifies the number of times the driver attempts to transmit
  4.7538 -  a message before giving up, if the transmit queue of the ATM card
  4.7539 -  is transiently saturated.
  4.7540 -
  4.7541 -  Saturation of the transmit queue may occur only under extreme
  4.7542 -  conditions, e.g. when a fast host continuously submits very small
  4.7543 -  frames (<64 bytes) or raw AAL0 cells (48 bytes) to the ATM adapter.
  4.7544 -
  4.7545 -  Note that under common conditions, it is unlikely that you encounter
  4.7546 -  a saturation of the transmit queue, so the retry mechanism never
  4.7547 -  comes into play.
  4.7548 -
  4.7549 -Debugging level (0-3)
  4.7550 -CONFIG_ATM_FORE200E_DEBUG
  4.7551 -  Specifies the level of debugging messages issued by the driver.
  4.7552 -  The verbosity of the driver increases with the value of this
  4.7553 -  parameter.
  4.7554 -
  4.7555 -  When active, these messages can have a significant impact on
  4.7556 -  the performances of the driver, and the size of your syslog files!
  4.7557 -  Keep the debugging level to 0 during normal operations.
  4.7558 -
  4.7559 -ForeRunner HE Series
  4.7560 -CONFIG_ATM_HE
  4.7561 -  This is a driver for the Marconi ForeRunner HE-series ATM adapter
  4.7562 -  cards. It simultaneously supports the 155 and 622 versions.
  4.7563 -
  4.7564 -Use S/UNI PHY driver
  4.7565 -  Support for the S/UNI-Ultra and S/UNI-622 found in the ForeRunner
  4.7566 -  HE cards.  This driver provides carrier detection some statistics.
  4.7567 -
  4.7568 -PPP over ATM
  4.7569 -CONFIG_PPPOATM
  4.7570 -  Support PPP (Point to Point Protocol) encapsulated in ATM frames.
  4.7571 -  This implementation does not yet comply with section 8 of RFC2364,
  4.7572 -  which can lead to bad results idf the ATM peer loses state and 
  4.7573 -  changes its encapsulation unilaterally.
  4.7574 -
  4.7575 -Fusion MPT device support
  4.7576 -CONFIG_FUSION
  4.7577 -  LSI Logic Fusion(TM) Message Passing Technology (MPT) device support
  4.7578 -  provides high performance SCSI host initiator, and LAN [1] interface
  4.7579 -  services to a host system.  The Fusion architecture is capable of
  4.7580 -  duplexing these protocols on high-speed Fibre Channel
  4.7581 -  (up to 2 GHz x 2 ports = 4 GHz) and parallel SCSI (up to Ultra-320)
  4.7582 -  physical medium.
  4.7583 -
  4.7584 -          [1] LAN is not supported on parallel SCSI medium.
  4.7585 -
  4.7586 -  These drivers require a Fusion MPT compatible PCI adapter installed
  4.7587 -  in the host system.  MPT adapters contain specialized I/O processors
  4.7588 -  to handle I/O workload, and more importantly to offload this work
  4.7589 -  from the host CPU(s).
  4.7590 -
  4.7591 -  If you have Fusion MPT hardware and want to use it, you can say
  4.7592 -  Y or M here to add MPT (base + ScsiHost) drivers.
  4.7593 -    <Y> = build lib (fusion.o), and link [static] into the kernel [2]
  4.7594 -          proper
  4.7595 -    <M> = compiled as [dynamic] modules [3] named: (mptbase.o,
  4.7596 -          mptscsih.o)
  4.7597 -
  4.7598 -          [2] In order enable capability to boot the linux kernel
  4.7599 -              natively from a Fusion MPT target device, you MUST
  4.7600 -               answer Y here! (currently requires CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SD)
  4.7601 -          [3] This support is also available as a module ( = code
  4.7602 -              which can be inserted in and removed from the running
  4.7603 -              kernel whenever you want).  If you want to compile as
  4.7604 -              modules, say M here and read
  4.7605 -              <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.7606 -
  4.7607 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.7608 -
  4.7609 -  If you say Y or M here you will get a choice of these
  4.7610 -  additional protocol and support module options:         Module Name:
  4.7611 -    <M>   Enhanced SCSI error reporting                     (isense.o)
  4.7612 -    <M>   Fusion MPT misc device (ioctl) driver             (mptctl.o)
  4.7613 -    <M>   Fusion MPT LAN driver                             (mptlan.o)
  4.7614 -
  4.7615 -  ---
  4.7616 -  Fusion MPT is trademark of LSI Logic Corporation, and its
  4.7617 -  architecture is based on LSI Logic's Message Passing Interface (MPI)
  4.7618 -  specification.
  4.7619 -
  4.7620 -Maximum number of scatter gather entries
  4.7621 -CONFIG_FUSION_MAX_SGE
  4.7622 -  This option allows you to specify the maximum number of scatter-
  4.7623 -  gather entries per I/O. The driver defaults to 40, a reasonable number
  4.7624 -  for most systems. However, the user may increase this up to 128.
  4.7625 -  Increasing this parameter will require significantly more memory
  4.7626 -  on a per controller instance. Increasing the parameter is not
  4.7627 -  necessary (or recommended) unless the user will be running
  4.7628 -  large I/O's via the raw interface.
  4.7629 -
  4.7630 -Fusion MPT enhanced SCSI error reporting [optional] module
  4.7631 -CONFIG_FUSION_ISENSE
  4.7632 -  The isense module (roughly stands for Interpret SENSE data) is
  4.7633 -  completely optional.  It simply provides extra English readable
  4.7634 -  strings in SCSI Error Report(s) that might be generated from the
  4.7635 -  Fusion MPT SCSI Host driver, for example when a target device
  4.7636 -  returns a SCSI check condition on a I/O.  Without this module
  4.7637 -  loaded you might see:
  4.7638 -
  4.7639 -    SCSI Error Report =-=-= (ioc0,scsi5:0)
  4.7640 -      SCSI_Status=02h (CHECK_CONDITION)
  4.7641 -      Original_CDB[]: 2A 00 00 00 00 41 00 00 02 00
  4.7642 -      SenseData[12h]: 70 00 02 00 00 00 00 0A 00 00 00 00 04 02 02 00 00 00
  4.7643 -      SenseKey=2h (NOT READY); FRU=02h
  4.7644 -      ASC/ASCQ=29h/00h
  4.7645 -
  4.7646 -  Where otherwise, if this module had been loaded, you would see:
  4.7647 -
  4.7648 -    SCSI Error Report =-=-= (ioc0,scsi5:0)
  4.7649 -      SCSI_Status=02h (CHECK_CONDITION)
  4.7650 -      Original_CDB[]: 2A 00 00 00 00 41 00 00 02 00 - "WRITE(10)"
  4.7651 -      SenseData[12h]: 70 00 02 00 00 00 00 0A 00 00 00 00 04 02 02 00 00 00
  4.7652 -      SenseKey=2h (NOT READY); FRU=02h
  4.7653 -      ASC/ASCQ=29h/00h "LOGICAL UNIT NOT READY, INITIALIZING CMD. REQUIRED"
  4.7654 -
  4.7655 -  Say M for "Enhanced SCSI error reporting" to compile this optional module,
  4.7656 -  creating a driver named: isense.o.
  4.7657 -
  4.7658 -  NOTE: Support for building this feature into the kernel is not
  4.7659 -  available, due to kernel size considerations.
  4.7660 -
  4.7661 -Fusion MPT misc device (ioctl) driver [optional] module
  4.7662 -CONFIG_FUSION_CTL
  4.7663 -  The Fusion MPT misc device driver provides specialized control
  4.7664 -  of MPT adapters via system ioctl calls.  Use of ioctl calls to
  4.7665 -  the MPT driver requires that you create and use a misc device
  4.7666 -  node ala:
  4.7667 -    mknod /dev/mptctl c 10 240
  4.7668 -
  4.7669 -  One use of this ioctl interface is to perform an upgrade (reflash)
  4.7670 -  of the MPT adapter firmware.  Refer to readme file(s) distributed
  4.7671 -  with the Fusion MPT linux driver for additional details.
  4.7672 -
  4.7673 -  If enabled by saying M to this, a driver named: mptctl.o
  4.7674 -  will be compiled.
  4.7675 -
  4.7676 -  If unsure whether you really want or need this, say N.
  4.7677 -
  4.7678 -Fusion MPT LAN driver [optional]
  4.7679 -CONFIG_FUSION_LAN
  4.7680 -  This module supports LAN IP traffic over Fibre Channel port(s)
  4.7681 -  on Fusion MPT compatible hardware (LSIFC9xx chips).
  4.7682 -  The physical interface used is defined in RFC 2625.
  4.7683 -  Please refer to that document for details.
  4.7684 -
  4.7685 -  Installing this driver requires the knowledge to configure and
  4.7686 -  activate a new network interface, "fc0", using standard Linux tools.
  4.7687 -
  4.7688 -  If enabled by saying M to this, a driver named: mptlan.o
  4.7689 -  will be compiled.
  4.7690 -
  4.7691 -  If unsure whether you really want or need this, say N.
  4.7692 -
  4.7693 -  NOTES: This feature is NOT available nor supported for linux-2.2.x
  4.7694 -  kernels.  You must be building a linux-2.3.x or linux-2.4.x kernel
  4.7695 -  in order to configure this option.
  4.7696 -  Support for building this feature into the linux kernel is not
  4.7697 -  yet available.
  4.7698 -
  4.7699 -SCSI support
  4.7700 -CONFIG_SCSI
  4.7701 -  If you want to use a SCSI hard disk, SCSI tape drive, SCSI CD-ROM or
  4.7702 -  any other SCSI device under Linux, say Y and make sure that you know
  4.7703 -  the name of your SCSI host adapter (the card inside your computer
  4.7704 -  that "speaks" the SCSI protocol, also called SCSI controller),
  4.7705 -  because you will be asked for it.
  4.7706 -
  4.7707 -  You also need to say Y here if you want support for the parallel
  4.7708 -  port version of the 100 MB IOMEGA ZIP drive.
  4.7709 -
  4.7710 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7711 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7712 -  The module will be called scsi_mod.o.  If you want to compile it as
  4.7713 -  a module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
  4.7714 -  <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.  However, do not compile this as a
  4.7715 -  module if your root file system (the one containing the directory /)
  4.7716 -  is located on a SCSI device.
  4.7717 -
  4.7718 -SCSI disk support
  4.7719 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SD
  4.7720 -  If you want to use a SCSI hard disk or the SCSI or parallel port
  4.7721 -  version of the IOMEGA ZIP drive under Linux, say Y and read the
  4.7722 -  SCSI-HOWTO, the Disk-HOWTO and the Multi-Disk-HOWTO, available from
  4.7723 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. This is NOT for SCSI
  4.7724 -  CD-ROMs.
  4.7725 -
  4.7726 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7727 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7728 -  The module will be called sd_mod.o.  If you want to compile it as a
  4.7729 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
  4.7730 -  <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.  Do not compile this driver as a
  4.7731 -  module if your root file system (the one containing the directory /)
  4.7732 -  is located on a SCSI disk. In this case, do not compile the driver
  4.7733 -  for your SCSI host adapter (below) as a module either.
  4.7734 -
  4.7735 -Maximum number of SCSI disks that can be loaded as modules
  4.7736 -CONFIG_SD_EXTRA_DEVS
  4.7737 -  This controls the amount of additional space allocated in tables for
  4.7738 -  drivers that are loaded as modules after the kernel is booted.  In
  4.7739 -  the event that the SCSI core itself was loaded as a module, this
  4.7740 -  value is the number of additional disks that can be loaded after the
  4.7741 -  first host driver is loaded.
  4.7742 -
  4.7743 -  Admittedly this isn't pretty, but there are tons of race conditions
  4.7744 -  involved with resizing the internal arrays on the fly.  Someday this
  4.7745 -  flag will go away, and everything will work automatically.
  4.7746 -
  4.7747 -  If you don't understand what's going on, go with the default.
  4.7748 -
  4.7749 -Maximum number of SCSI tapes that can be loaded as modules
  4.7750 -CONFIG_ST_EXTRA_DEVS
  4.7751 -  This controls the amount of additional space allocated in tables for
  4.7752 -  drivers that are loaded as modules after the kernel is booted.  In
  4.7753 -  the event that the SCSI core itself was loaded as a module, this
  4.7754 -  value is the number of additional tapes that can be loaded after the
  4.7755 -  first host driver is loaded.
  4.7756 -
  4.7757 -  Admittedly this isn't pretty, but there are tons of race conditions
  4.7758 -  involved with resizing the internal arrays on the fly.  Someday this
  4.7759 -  flag will go away, and everything will work automatically.
  4.7760 -
  4.7761 -  If you don't understand what's going on, go with the default.
  4.7762 -
  4.7763 -SCSI tape support
  4.7764 -CONFIG_CHR_DEV_ST
  4.7765 -  If you want to use a SCSI tape drive under Linux, say Y and read the
  4.7766 -  SCSI-HOWTO, available from
  4.7767 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, and
  4.7768 -  <file:drivers/scsi/README.st> in the kernel source.  This is NOT for
  4.7769 -  SCSI CD-ROMs.
  4.7770 -
  4.7771 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7772 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7773 -  The module will be called st.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.7774 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
  4.7775 -  <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.
  4.7776 -
  4.7777 -OnStream SC-x0 SCSI tape support
  4.7778 -CONFIG_CHR_DEV_OSST
  4.7779 -  The OnStream SC-x0 SCSI tape drives can not be driven by the
  4.7780 -  standard st driver, but instead need this special osst driver and
  4.7781 -  use the  /dev/osstX char device nodes (major 206).  Via usb-storage
  4.7782 -  and ide-scsi, you may be able to drive the USB-x0 and DI-x0 drives
  4.7783 -  as well.  Note that there is also a second generation of OnStream
  4.7784 -  tape drives (ADR-x0) that supports the standard SCSI-2 commands for
  4.7785 -  tapes (QIC-157) and can be driven by the standard driver st.
  4.7786 -  For more information, you may have a look at the SCSI-HOWTO
  4.7787 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>  and
  4.7788 -  <file:drivers/scsi/README.osst>  in the kernel source.
  4.7789 -  More info on the OnStream driver may be found on
  4.7790 -  <http://linux1.onstream.nl/test/>
  4.7791 -  Please also have a look at the standard st docu, as most of it
  4.7792 -  applies to osst as well.
  4.7793 -
  4.7794 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7795 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7796 -  The module will be called osst.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.7797 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
  4.7798 -  <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.
  4.7799 -
  4.7800 -SCSI CD-ROM support
  4.7801 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SR
  4.7802 -  If you want to use a SCSI CD-ROM under Linux, say Y and read the
  4.7803 -  SCSI-HOWTO and the CD-ROM-HOWTO at
  4.7804 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. Also make sure to say Y
  4.7805 -  or M to "ISO 9660 CD-ROM file system support" later.
  4.7806 -
  4.7807 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7808 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7809 -  The module will be called sr_mod.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.7810 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
  4.7811 -  <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>.
  4.7812 -
  4.7813 -Maximum number of CD-ROM devices that can be loaded as modules
  4.7814 -CONFIG_SR_EXTRA_DEVS
  4.7815 -  This controls the amount of additional space allocated in tables for
  4.7816 -  drivers that are loaded as modules after the kernel is booted. In
  4.7817 -  the event that the SCSI core itself was loaded as a module, this
  4.7818 -  value is the number of additional CD-ROMs that can be loaded after
  4.7819 -  the first host driver is loaded.
  4.7820 -
  4.7821 -  Admittedly this isn't pretty, but there are tons of race conditions
  4.7822 -  involved with resizing the internal arrays on the fly.  Someday this
  4.7823 -  flag will go away, and everything will work automatically.
  4.7824 -
  4.7825 -  If you don't understand what's going on, go with the default.
  4.7826 -
  4.7827 -Enable vendor-specific extensions (for SCSI CD-ROM)
  4.7828 -CONFIG_BLK_DEV_SR_VENDOR
  4.7829 -  This enables the usage of vendor specific SCSI commands. This is
  4.7830 -  required to support multisession CDs with old NEC/TOSHIBA cdrom
  4.7831 -  drives (and HP Writers). If you have such a drive and get the first
  4.7832 -  session only, try saying Y here; everybody else says N.
  4.7833 -
  4.7834 -SCSI generic support
  4.7835 -CONFIG_CHR_DEV_SG
  4.7836 -  If you want to use SCSI scanners, synthesizers or CD-writers or just
  4.7837 -  about anything having "SCSI" in its name other than hard disks,
  4.7838 -  CD-ROMs or tapes, say Y here. These won't be supported by the kernel
  4.7839 -  directly, so you need some additional software which knows how to
  4.7840 -  talk to these devices using the SCSI protocol:
  4.7841 -
  4.7842 -  For scanners, look at SANE (<http://www.mostang.com/sane/>). For CD
  4.7843 -  writer software look at Cdrtools
  4.7844 -  (<http://www.fokus.gmd.de/research/cc/glone/employees/joerg.schilling/private/cdrecord.html>)
  4.7845 -  and for burning a "disk at once": CDRDAO
  4.7846 -  (<http://cdrdao.sourceforge.net/>). Cdparanoia is a high
  4.7847 -  quality digital reader of audio CDs (<http://www.xiph.org/paranoia/>).
  4.7848 -  For other devices, it's possible that you'll have to write the
  4.7849 -  driver software yourself. Please read the file
  4.7850 -  <file:Documentation/scsi-generic.txt> for more information.
  4.7851 -
  4.7852 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7853 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.7854 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt> and
  4.7855 -  <file:Documentation/scsi.txt>. The module will be called sg.o. If unsure,
  4.7856 -  say N.
  4.7857 -
  4.7858 -Probe all LUNs on each SCSI device
  4.7859 -CONFIG_SCSI_MULTI_LUN
  4.7860 -  If you have a SCSI device that supports more than one LUN (Logical
  4.7861 -  Unit Number), e.g. a CD jukebox, and only one LUN is detected, you
  4.7862 -  can say Y here to force the SCSI driver to probe for multiple LUNs.
  4.7863 -  A SCSI device with multiple LUNs acts logically like multiple SCSI
  4.7864 -  devices. The vast majority of SCSI devices have only one LUN, and
  4.7865 -  so most people can say N here and should in fact do so, because it
  4.7866 -  is safer.
  4.7867 -
  4.7868 -Verbose SCSI error reporting (kernel size +=12K)
  4.7869 -CONFIG_SCSI_CONSTANTS
  4.7870 -  The error messages regarding your SCSI hardware will be easier to
  4.7871 -  understand if you say Y here; it will enlarge your kernel by about
  4.7872 -  12 KB. If in doubt, say Y.
  4.7873 -
  4.7874 -SCSI logging facility
  4.7875 -CONFIG_SCSI_LOGGING
  4.7876 -  This turns on a logging facility that can be used to debug a number
  4.7877 -  of SCSI related problems.
  4.7878 -
  4.7879 -  If you say Y here, no logging output will appear by default, but you
  4.7880 -  can enable logging by saying Y to "/proc file system support" and
  4.7881 -  "Sysctl support" below and executing the command
  4.7882 -
  4.7883 -     echo "scsi log token [level]" > /proc/scsi/scsi
  4.7884 -
  4.7885 -  at boot time after the /proc file system has been mounted.
  4.7886 -
  4.7887 -  There are a number of things that can be used for 'token' (you can
  4.7888 -  find them in the source: <file:drivers/scsi/scsi.c>), and this
  4.7889 -  allows you to select the types of information you want, and the
  4.7890 -  level allows you to select the level of verbosity.
  4.7891 -
  4.7892 -  If you say N here, it may be harder to track down some types of SCSI
  4.7893 -  problems. If you say Y here your kernel will be somewhat larger, but
  4.7894 -  there should be no noticeable performance impact as long as you have
  4.7895 -  logging turned off.
  4.7896 -
  4.7897 -QDIO base support for IBM S/390 and zSeries
  4.7898 -CONFIG_QDIO
  4.7899 -  This driver provides the Queued Direct I/O base support for the
  4.7900 -  IBM S/390 (G5 and G6) and eServer zSeries (z800 and z900).
  4.7901 -
  4.7902 -  For details please refer to the documentation provided by IBM at
  4.7903 -  <http://www10.software.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/linux390>
  4.7904 -
  4.7905 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7906 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7907 -  The module will be called qdio.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.7908 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.7909 -
  4.7910 -  If unsure, say Y.
  4.7911 -
  4.7912 -Performance statistics for QDIO base support
  4.7913 -CONFIG_QDIO_PERF_STATS
  4.7914 -  Say Y here to get performance statistics in /proc/qdio_perf
  4.7915 -
  4.7916 -  If unsure, say N.
  4.7917 -
  4.7918 -SGI WD93C93 SCSI Driver
  4.7919 -CONFIG_SCSI_SGIWD93
  4.7920 -  Say Y here to support the on-board WD93C93 SCSI controller found (a)
  4.7921 -  on the Indigo2 and other MIPS-based SGI machines, and (b) on ARCS
  4.7922 -  ARM-based machines.
  4.7923 -
  4.7924 -DEC NCR53C94 SCSI Driver
  4.7925 -CONFIG_SCSI_DECNCR
  4.7926 -  Say Y here to support the NCR53C94 SCSI controller chips on IOASIC
  4.7927 -  based TURBOchannel DECstations and TURBOchannel PMAZ-A cards.
  4.7928 -
  4.7929 -AdvanSys SCSI support
  4.7930 -CONFIG_SCSI_ADVANSYS
  4.7931 -  This is a driver for all SCSI host adapters manufactured by
  4.7932 -  AdvanSys. It is documented in the kernel source in
  4.7933 -  <file:drivers/scsi/advansys.c>.
  4.7934 -
  4.7935 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7936 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7937 -  If you want to compile it as a module, say M here and read
  4.7938 -  <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module will be called
  4.7939 -  advansys.o.
  4.7940 -
  4.7941 -Adaptec AHA152X/2825 support
  4.7942 -CONFIG_SCSI_AHA152X
  4.7943 -  This is a driver for the AHA-1510, AHA-1520, AHA-1522, and AHA-2825
  4.7944 -  SCSI host adapters. It also works for the AVA-1505, but the IRQ etc.
  4.7945 -  must be manually specified in this case.
  4.7946 -
  4.7947 -  It is explained in section 3.3 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
  4.7948 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>. You might also want to
  4.7949 -  read the file <file:drivers/scsi/README.aha152x>.
  4.7950 -
  4.7951 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7952 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7953 -  The module will be called aha152x.o. If you want to compile it as a
  4.7954 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.7955 -
  4.7956 -Adaptec AHA1542 support
  4.7957 -CONFIG_SCSI_AHA1542
  4.7958 -  This is support for a SCSI host adapter.  It is explained in section
  4.7959 -  3.4 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
  4.7960 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.  Note that Trantor was
  4.7961 -  purchased by Adaptec, and some former Trantor products are being
  4.7962 -  sold under the Adaptec name.  If it doesn't work out of the box, you
  4.7963 -  may have to change some settings in <file:drivers/scsi/aha1542.h>.
  4.7964 -
  4.7965 -  If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7966 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.7967 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.7968 -  will be called aha1542.o.
  4.7969 -
  4.7970 -Adaptec AHA1740 support
  4.7971 -CONFIG_SCSI_AHA1740
  4.7972 -  This is support for a SCSI host adapter.  It is explained in section
  4.7973 -  3.5 of the SCSI-HOWTO, available from
  4.7974 -  <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>.  If it doesn't work out
  4.7975 -  of the box, you may have to change some settings in
  4.7976 -  <file:drivers/scsi/aha1740.h>.
  4.7977 -
  4.7978 -  This driver is also available as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7979 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want).
  4.7980 -  The module will be called aha1740.o.  If you want to compile it as a
  4.7981 -  module, say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.
  4.7982 -
  4.7983 -Adaptec AIC7xxx support
  4.7984 -CONFIG_SCSI_AIC7XXX
  4.7985 -  This driver supports all of Adaptec's Fast through Ultra 160 PCI
  4.7986 -  based SCSI controllers as well as the aic7770 based EISA and VLB
  4.7987 -  SCSI controllers (the 274x and 284x series).  For AAA and ARO based
  4.7988 -  configurations, only SCSI functionality is provided.
  4.7989 -
  4.7990 -  If you want to compile the driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.7991 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.7992 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.7993 -  will be called aic7xxx.o.
  4.7994 -
  4.7995 -Maximum number of TCQ commands per device
  4.7996 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_CMDS_PER_DEVICE
  4.7997 -  Specify the number of commands you would like to allocate per SCSI
  4.7998 -  device when Tagged Command Queueing (TCQ) is enabled on that device.
  4.7999 -
  4.8000 -  This is an upper bound value for the number of tagged transactions
  4.8001 -  to be used for any device.  The aic7xxx driver will automatically
  4.8002 -  vary this number based on device behavior.  For devices with a
  4.8003 -  fixed maximum, the driver will eventually lock to this maximum
  4.8004 -  and display a console message indicating this value.
  4.8005 -
  4.8006 -  Due to resource allocation issues in the Linux SCSI mid-layer, using
  4.8007 -  a high number of commands per device may result in memory allocation
  4.8008 -  failures when many devices are attached to the system.  For this reason,
  4.8009 -  the default is set to 32.  Higher values may result in higer performance
  4.8010 -  on some devices.  The upper bound is 253. 0 disables tagged queueing.
  4.8011 -
  4.8012 -  Per device tag depth can be controlled via the kernel command line
  4.8013 -  "tag_info" option.  See drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/README.aic7xxx
  4.8014 -  for details.
  4.8015 -
  4.8016 -  Default: 32
  4.8017 -
  4.8018 -Initial bus reset delay in milli-seconds
  4.8019 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_RESET_DELAY_MS
  4.8020 -  The number of milliseconds to delay after an initial bus reset.
  4.8021 -  The bus settle delay following all error recovery actions is
  4.8022 -  dictated by the SCSI layer and is not affected by this value.
  4.8023 -
  4.8024 -  Default: 15000 (15 seconds)
  4.8025 -
  4.8026 -Probe for EISA and VL AIC7XXX Adapters
  4.8027 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_PROBE_EISA_VL
  4.8028 -   Probe for EISA and VLB Aic7xxx controllers.  In many newer systems,
  4.8029 -   the invasive probes necessary to detect these controllers can cause
  4.8030 -   other devices to fail.  For this reason, the non-PCI probe code is
  4.8031 -   disabled by default.  The current value of this option can be "toggled"
  4.8032 -   via the no_probe kernel command line option.
  4.8033 -
  4.8034 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_BUILD_FIRMWARE
  4.8035 -  This option should only be enabled if you are modifying the firmware
  4.8036 -  source to the aic7xxx driver and wish to have the generated firmware
  4.8037 -  include files updated during a normal kernel build.  The assembler
  4.8038 -  for the firmware requires lex and yacc or their equivalents, as well
  4.8039 -  as the db v1 library.  You may have to install additional packages
  4.8040 -  or modify the assembler Makefile or the files it includes if your
  4.8041 -  build environment is different than that of the author.
  4.8042 -
  4.8043 -Compile in Debugging Code
  4.8044 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_DEBUG_ENABLE
  4.8045 -  Compile in aic7xxx debugging code that can be useful in diagnosing
  4.8046 -  driver errors.
  4.8047 -
  4.8048 -Debug code enable mask (2048 for all debugging)
  4.8049 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_DEBUG_MASK
  4.8050 -  Bit mask of debug options that is only valid if the
  4.8051 -  CONFIG_AIC7XXX_DEBUG_ENBLE option is enabled.  The bits in this mask
  4.8052 -  are defined in the drivers/scsi/aic7xxx/aic7xxx.h - search for the
  4.8053 -  variable ahc_debug in that file to find them.
  4.8054 -
  4.8055 -  Default: 0
  4.8056 -
  4.8057 -Decode registers during diagnostics
  4.8058 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_REG_PRETTY_PRINT
  4.8059 -  Compile in register value tables for the output of expanded register
  4.8060 -  contents in diagnostics.  This make it much easier to understand debug
  4.8061 -  output without having to refer to a data book and/or the aic7xxx.reg file.
  4.8062 -
  4.8063 -Old Adaptec AIC7xxx support
  4.8064 -CONFIG_SCSI_AIC7XXX_OLD
  4.8065 -  WARNING This driver is an older aic7xxx driver and is no longer
  4.8066 -  under active development.  Adaptec, Inc. is writing a new driver to
  4.8067 -  take the place of this one, and it is recommended that whenever
  4.8068 -  possible, people should use the new Adaptec written driver instead
  4.8069 -  of this one.  This driver will eventually be phased out entirely.
  4.8070 -
  4.8071 -  This is support for the various aic7xxx based Adaptec SCSI
  4.8072 -  controllers. These include the 274x EISA cards; 284x VLB cards;
  4.8073 -  2902, 2910, 293x, 294x, 394x, 3985 and several other PCI and
  4.8074 -  motherboard based SCSI controllers from Adaptec. It does not support
  4.8075 -  the AAA-13x RAID controllers from Adaptec, nor will it likely ever
  4.8076 -  support them. It does not support the 2920 cards from Adaptec that
  4.8077 -  use the Future Domain SCSI controller chip. For those cards, you
  4.8078 -  need the "Future Domain 16xx SCSI support" driver.
  4.8079 -
  4.8080 -  In general, if the controller is based on an Adaptec SCSI controller
  4.8081 -  chip from the aic777x series or the aic78xx series, this driver
  4.8082 -  should work. The only exception is the 7810 which is specifically
  4.8083 -  not supported (that's the RAID controller chip on the AAA-13x
  4.8084 -  cards).
  4.8085 -
  4.8086 -  Note that the AHA2920 SCSI host adapter is *not* supported by this
  4.8087 -  driver; choose "Future Domain 16xx SCSI support" instead if you have
  4.8088 -  one of those.
  4.8089 -
  4.8090 -  Information on the configuration options for this controller can be
  4.8091 -  found by checking the help file for each of the available
  4.8092 -  configuration options. You should read
  4.8093 -  <file:drivers/scsi/aic7xxx_old/README.aic7xxx> at a minimum before
  4.8094 -  contacting the maintainer with any questions.  The SCSI-HOWTO,
  4.8095 -  available from <http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto>, can also
  4.8096 -  be of great help.
  4.8097 -
  4.8098 -  If you want to compile this driver as a module ( = code which can be
  4.8099 -  inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want),
  4.8100 -  say M here and read <file:Documentation/modules.txt>.  The module
  4.8101 -  will be called aic7xxx_old.o.
  4.8102 -
  4.8103 -Enable tagged command queueing (TCQ) by default
  4.8104 -CONFIG_AIC7XXX_OLD_TCQ_ON_BY_DEFAULT
  4.8105 -  This option causes the aic7xxx driver to attempt to use Tagged
  4.8106 -  Command Queueing (TCQ) on all devices that claim to support it.
  4.8107 -
  4.8108 -  TCQ is a feature of SCSI-2 which improves performance: the host
  4.8109 -  adapter can send several SCSI commands to a device's queue even if
  4.8110 -  previous commands haven't finished yet.  Because the device is
  4.8111 -  intelligent, it can optimize its operations (like head positioning)
  4.8112 -  based on its own request queue.  Not all devices implement this
  4.8113 -  correctly.
  4.8114 -
  4.8115 -  If you say Y here, you can still turn off TCQ on troublesome devices
  4.8116 -  with the use of the tag_info boot parameter.  See the file
  4.8117 -  <file:drivers/scsi/README.aic7xxx> for more information on that and
  4.8118 -  other aic7xxx setup commands.  If this option is turned off, you may
  4.8119 -  still enable TCQ on known good devices by use of the tag_info boot
  4.8120 -  parameter.
  4.8121 -
  4.8122 -  If you are unsure about your devices then it is safest to say N
  4.8123 -  here.
  4.8124 -
  4.8125 -  However, TCQ can increase performance on some hard drives by as much
  4.8126 -  as 50% or more, so it is recommended that if you say N here, you
  4.8127 -  should at least read the <file:drivers/scsi/README.aic7xxx> file so
  4.8128 -  you will know how to enable this option manually should your drives
  4.8129 -  prove to be safe in regards to TCQ.
  4.8130 -
  4.8131 -  Conversely, certain drives are known to lock up or cause bus resets
  4.8132