ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 8227:57d5f6c9b9ef

Small cleanup for distro chapters.

Signed-off-by: Robb Romans <FMJ@us.ibm.com>
author Robb Romans <FMJ@us.ibm.com>
date Fri Dec 02 14:29:26 2005 -0700 (2005-12-02)
parents dceb2fcdab5b
children dcfeb9e234d1
files docs/src/user/debian.tex docs/src/user/fedora.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/src/user/debian.tex	Fri Dec 02 14:29:26 2005 -0700
     1.2 +++ b/docs/src/user/debian.tex	Fri Dec 02 14:29:26 2005 -0700
     1.3 @@ -8,8 +8,8 @@ requiring the host system to have any De
     1.4  Here's some info on how to install Debian 3.1 (Sarge) for an
     1.5  unprivileged Xen domain:
     1.6  
     1.7 +\section{Filesystem Setup}
     1.8  \begin{enumerate}
     1.9 -
    1.10  \item Set up Xen and test that it's working, as described earlier in
    1.11    this manual.
    1.12  
    1.13 @@ -35,7 +35,9 @@ mkswap /path/swapimage
    1.14  \begin{verbatim}
    1.15  mount -o loop /path/diskimage /mnt/disk
    1.16  \end{verbatim}
    1.17 -
    1.18 +\end{enumerate}
    1.19 +\section{Bootstrapping}
    1.20 +\begin{enumerate}
    1.21  \item Install \path{debootstrap}. Make sure you have debootstrap
    1.22    installed on the host. If you are running Debian Sarge (3.1 / testing)
    1.23    or unstable you can install it by running \path{apt-get install
    1.24 @@ -48,7 +50,10 @@ debootstrap --arch i386 sarge /mnt/disk 
    1.25              http://ftp.<countrycode>.debian.org/debian
    1.26  \end{verbatim}
    1.27    You may use any Debian mirror that you want.
    1.28 +\end{enumerate}
    1.29  
    1.30 +\section{Configuration}
    1.31 +\begin{enumerate}
    1.32  \item When debootstrap completes successfully, modify settings:
    1.33  \begin{verbatim}
    1.34  chroot /mnt/disk /bin/bash
    1.35 @@ -98,7 +103,10 @@ umount /mnt/disk
    1.36  disk = [ 'file:/path/diskimage,sda1,w', 'file:/path/swapimage,sda2,w' ]
    1.37  root = "/dev/sda1 ro"
    1.38  \end{verbatim}
    1.39 +\end{enumerate}
    1.40  
    1.41 +\section{Starting the New Domain}
    1.42 +\begin{enumerate}
    1.43  \item Start the new domain
    1.44  \begin{verbatim}
    1.45  xm create -f domain_config_file
     2.1 --- a/docs/src/user/fedora.tex	Fri Dec 02 14:29:26 2005 -0700
     2.2 +++ b/docs/src/user/fedora.tex	Fri Dec 02 14:29:26 2005 -0700
     2.3 @@ -1,61 +1,66 @@
     2.4 -\chapter{Installing Xen on Red~Hat or Fedora Core}
     2.5 +\chapter{Installing Xen on Red~Hat or Fedora~Core}
     2.6  
     2.7 -When using Xen / XenLinux on a standard Linux distribution there are a
     2.8 -couple of things to watch out for:
     2.9 +\section{Tips}
    2.10 +Here are a few pointers about using Xen / XenLinux on a Red~Hat or
    2.11 +Fedora~Core distribution:
    2.12  
    2.13 -Note that, because domains greater than 0 don't have any privileged
    2.14 -access at all, certain commands in the default boot sequence will fail
    2.15 -e.g.\ attempts to update the hwclock, change the console font, update
    2.16 -the keytable map, start apmd (power management), or gpm (mouse
    2.17 -cursor).  Either ignore the errors (they should be harmless), or
    2.18 -remove them from the startup scripts.  Deleting the following links
    2.19 -are a good start: {\path{S24pcmcia}}, {\path{S09isdn}},
    2.20 -{\path{S17keytable}}, {\path{S26apmd}}, {\path{S85gpm}}.
    2.21 +\begin{enumerate}
    2.22 +\item Note that, because domains greater than~0 don't have any
    2.23 +  privileged access at all, certain commands in the default boot
    2.24 +  sequence will fail e.g.\ attempts to update the hwclock, change the
    2.25 +  console font, update the keytable map, start apmd (power management),
    2.26 +  or gpm (mouse cursor). Either ignore the errors (they should be
    2.27 +  harmless), or remove them from the startup scripts. Deleting the
    2.28 +  following links are a good start: {\path{S24pcmcia}},
    2.29 +  {\path{S09isdn}}, {\path{S17keytable}}, {\path{S26apmd}},
    2.30 +  {\path{S85gpm}}.
    2.31  
    2.32 -If you want to use a single root file system that works cleanly for
    2.33 -both domain~0 and unprivileged domains, a useful trick is to use
    2.34 -different `init' run levels. For example, use run level 3 for
    2.35 -domain~0, and run level 4 for other domains. This enables different
    2.36 -startup scripts to be run in depending on the run level number passed
    2.37 -on the kernel command line.
    2.38 +\item If you want to use a single root file system that works cleanly
    2.39 +  for both domain~0 and unprivileged domains, a useful trick is to use
    2.40 +  different `init' run levels. For example, use run level 3 for
    2.41 +  domain~0, and run level 4 for other domains. This enables different
    2.42 +  startup scripts to be run in depending on the run level number passed
    2.43 +  on the kernel command line.
    2.44  
    2.45 -If using NFS root files systems mounted either from an external server
    2.46 -or from domain0 there are a couple of other gotchas.  The default
    2.47 -{\path{/etc/sysconfig/iptables}} rules block NFS, so part way through
    2.48 -the boot sequence things will suddenly go dead.
    2.49 +\item If using NFS root files systems mounted either from an external
    2.50 +  server or from domain0 there are a couple of other gotchas. The
    2.51 +  default {\path{/etc/sysconfig/iptables}} rules block NFS, so part way
    2.52 +  through the boot sequence things will suddenly go dead.
    2.53  
    2.54 -If you're planning on having a separate NFS {\path{/usr}} partition,
    2.55 -the RH9 boot scripts don't make life easy - they attempt to mount NFS
    2.56 -file systems way to late in the boot process. The easiest way I found
    2.57 -to do this was to have a {\path{/linuxrc}} script run ahead of
    2.58 -{\path{/sbin/init}} that mounts {\path{/usr}}:
    2.59 +\item If you're planning on having a separate NFS {\path{/usr}}
    2.60 +  partition, the RH9 boot scripts don't make life easy - they attempt to
    2.61 +  mount NFS file systems way to late in the boot process. The easiest
    2.62 +  way I found to do this was to have a {\path{/linuxrc}} script run
    2.63 +  ahead of {\path{/sbin/init}} that mounts {\path{/usr}}:
    2.64  
    2.65 -\begin{quote}
    2.66 -  \begin{small}\begin{verbatim}
    2.67 +  \begin{quote}
    2.68 +    \begin{small}\begin{verbatim}
    2.69   #!/bin/bash
    2.70   /sbin/ipconfig lo 127.0.0.1
    2.71   /sbin/portmap
    2.72   /bin/mount /usr
    2.73   exec /sbin/init "$@" <>/dev/console 2>&1
    2.74  \end{verbatim}\end{small}
    2.75 -\end{quote}
    2.76 +  \end{quote}
    2.77  
    2.78  %% $ XXX SMH: font lock fix :-)
    2.79  
    2.80 -The one slight complication with the above is that
    2.81 -{\path{/sbin/portmap}} is dynamically linked against
    2.82 -{\path{/usr/lib/libwrap.so.0}} Since this is in {\path{/usr}}, it
    2.83 -won't work. This can be solved by copying the file (and link) below
    2.84 -the {\path{/usr}} mount point, and just let the file be `covered' when
    2.85 -the mount happens.
    2.86 +  The one slight complication with the above is that
    2.87 +  {\path{/sbin/portmap}} is dynamically linked against
    2.88 +  {\path{/usr/lib/libwrap.so.0}} Since this is in {\path{/usr}}, it
    2.89 +  won't work. This can be solved by copying the file (and link) below
    2.90 +  the {\path{/usr}} mount point, and just let the file be `covered' when
    2.91 +  the mount happens.
    2.92  
    2.93 -In some installations, where a shared read-only {\path{/usr}} is being
    2.94 -used, it may be desirable to move other large directories over into
    2.95 -the read-only {\path{/usr}}. For example, you might replace
    2.96 -{\path{/bin}}, {\path{/lib}} and {\path{/sbin}} with links into
    2.97 -{\path{/usr/root/bin}}, {\path{/usr/root/lib}} and
    2.98 -{\path{/usr/root/sbin}} respectively. This creates other problems for
    2.99 -running the {\path{/linuxrc}} script, requiring bash, portmap, mount,
   2.100 -ifconfig, and a handful of other shared libraries to be copied below
   2.101 -the mount point --- a simple statically-linked C program would solve
   2.102 -this problem.
   2.103 +\item In some installations, where a shared read-only {\path{/usr}} is
   2.104 +  being used, it may be desirable to move other large directories over
   2.105 +  into the read-only {\path{/usr}}. For example, you might replace
   2.106 +  {\path{/bin}}, {\path{/lib}} and {\path{/sbin}} with links into
   2.107 +  {\path{/usr/root/bin}}, {\path{/usr/root/lib}} and
   2.108 +  {\path{/usr/root/sbin}} respectively. This creates other problems for
   2.109 +  running the {\path{/linuxrc}} script, requiring bash, portmap, mount,
   2.110 +  ifconfig, and a handful of other shared libraries to be copied below
   2.111 +  the mount point --- a simple statically-linked C program would solve
   2.112 +  this problem.
   2.113 +
   2.114 +\end{enumerate}
   2.115 \ No newline at end of file