ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 2905:42882b3e0dda RELEASE-2.0.0

bitkeeper revision 1.1159.1.385 (418b582ajt_xRJBZ_QltlCQBhLkgkQ)

Merge freefall.cl.cam.ac.uk:/auto/groups/xeno/BK/xen-2.0.bk
into freefall.cl.cam.ac.uk:/auto/groups/xeno/BK/xen-unstable.bk
author kaf24@freefall.cl.cam.ac.uk
date Fri Nov 05 10:38:34 2004 +0000 (2004-11-05)
parents aceecd894728 be00b475e1d0
children 0d044a181214 3cf62df5b94b 1c0b0d49f291
files BitKeeper/etc/ignore docs/src/user.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/BitKeeper/etc/ignore	Fri Nov 05 10:12:47 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/BitKeeper/etc/ignore	Fri Nov 05 10:38:34 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -77,3 +77,5 @@ xen/xen-syms
     1.4  xen/xen.*
     1.5  install/*
     1.6  
     1.7 +patches/ebtables-brnf-5_vs_2.4.25.diff
     1.8 +patches/ebtables.diff
     2.1 --- a/docs/src/user.tex	Fri Nov 05 10:12:47 2004 +0000
     2.2 +++ b/docs/src/user.tex	Fri Nov 05 10:38:34 2004 +0000
     2.3 @@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ other domains and manages their virtual 
     2.4  administrative tasks such as suspending, resuming and migrating other
     2.5  virtual machines.
     2.6  
     2.7 -Within domain 0, a process called \xend runs to manage the system.
     2.8 +Within domain 0, a process called \emph{xend} runs to manage the system.
     2.9  \Xend is responsible for managing virtual machines and providing access
    2.10  to their consoles.  Commands are issued to \xend over an HTTP
    2.11  interface, either from a command-line tool or from a web browser.
    2.12 @@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ current plans to support these systems: 
    2.13  planned route to supporting larger memory sizes.
    2.14  
    2.15  Xen offloads most of the hardware support issues to the guest OS
    2.16 -running in Domain 0.  Xen itself contains only the code required to
    2.17 +running in Domain~0.  Xen itself contains only the code required to
    2.18  detect and start secondary processors, set up interrupt routing, and
    2.19  perform PCI bus enumeration.  Device drivers run within a privileged
    2.20  guest OS rather than within Xen itself. This approach provides
    2.21 @@ -367,7 +367,7 @@ KERNELS ?= mk.linux-2.6-xen0 mk.linux-2.
    2.22  
    2.23  You can edit this line to include any set of operating system kernels
    2.24  which have configurations in the top-level \path{buildconfigs/}
    2.25 -directory, for example {\tt mk.linux-2.4-xenU} to build a Linux 2.4
    2.26 +directory, for example \path{mk.linux-2.4-xenU} to build a Linux 2.4
    2.27  kernel containing only virtual device drivers.
    2.28  
    2.29  %% Inspect the Makefile if you want to see what goes on during a build.
    2.30 @@ -562,10 +562,13 @@ as root over the serial line will requir
    2.31  \subsection{TLS Libraries}
    2.32  
    2.33  Users of the XenLinux 2.6 kernel should disable Thread Local Storage
    2.34 -(e.g. by doing a \path{mv /lib/tls /lib/tls.disabled}) before
    2.35 -attempting to run with a XenLinux kernel.  You can always reenable it
    2.36 -by restoring the directory to its original location (i.e. 
    2.37 -\path{mv /lib/tls.disabled /lib/tls}).
    2.38 +(e.g.\ by doing a \path{mv /lib/tls /lib/tls.disabled}) before
    2.39 +attempting to run with a XenLinux kernel\footnote{If you boot without first
    2.40 +disabling TLS, you will get a warning message during the boot
    2.41 +process. In this case, simply perform the rename after the machine is
    2.42 +up and then run \texttt{/sbin/ldconfig} to make it take effect.}.  You can
    2.43 +always reenable it by restoring the directory to its original location
    2.44 +(i.e.\ \path{mv /lib/tls.disabled /lib/tls}).
    2.45  
    2.46  The reason for this is that the current TLS implementation uses
    2.47  segmentation in a way that is not permissible under Xen.  If TLS is
    2.48 @@ -691,7 +694,7 @@ machine ID~1 you should type:
    2.49  
    2.50  The \path{-c} switch causes \path{xm} to turn into the domain's
    2.51  console after creation.  The \path{vmid=1} sets the \path{vmid}
    2.52 -variable used in the \path{myvmconf} file.
    2.53 +variable used in the \path{myvmconf} file. 
    2.54  
    2.55  
    2.56  You should see the console boot messages from the new domain 
    2.57 @@ -840,16 +843,10 @@ port for the ttylinux domain is 9605.  T
    2.58  using a terminal program (e.g. \path{telnet} or, better, 
    2.59  \path{xencons}).  The simplest way to connect is to use the \path{xm console}
    2.60  command, specifying the domain name or ID.  To connect to the console
    2.61 -of the ttylinux domain, we could use:
    2.62 +of the ttylinux domain, we could use any of the following: 
    2.63  \begin{verbatim}
    2.64  # xm console ttylinux
    2.65 -\end{verbatim}
    2.66 -or:
    2.67 -\begin{verbatim}
    2.68  # xm console 5
    2.69 -\end{verbatim}
    2.70 -or:
    2.71 -\begin{verbatim}
    2.72  # xencons localhost 9605
    2.73  \end{verbatim}
    2.74  
    2.75 @@ -911,12 +908,12 @@ the command:
    2.76  # xm migrate --live mydomain destination.ournetwork.com
    2.77  \end{verbatim}
    2.78  
    2.79 -Without the {\tt --live} flag, \xend simply stops the domain and
    2.80 +Without the \path{--live} flag, \xend simply stops the domain and
    2.81  copies the memory image over to the new node and restarts it. Since
    2.82  domains can have large allocations this can be quite time consuming,
    2.83 -even on a Gigabit network. With the {\tt --live} flag \xend attempts
    2.84 +even on a Gigabit network. With the \path{--live} flag \xend attempts
    2.85  to keep the domain running while the migration is in progress,
    2.86 -resulting in typical 'downtimes' of just 60 -- 300ms.
    2.87 +resulting in typical `downtimes' of just 60--300ms.
    2.88  
    2.89  For now it will be necessary to reconnect to the domain's console on
    2.90  the new machine using the \path{xm console} command.  If a migrated
    2.91 @@ -1162,7 +1159,7 @@ and then issue an \path{lvextend}.
    2.92  In principle, it is possible to continue writing to the volume
    2.93  that has been cloned (the changes will not be visible to the
    2.94  clones), but we wouldn't recommend this: have the cloned volume
    2.95 -as a 'pristine' file system install that isn't mounted directly
    2.96 +as a `pristine' file system install that isn't mounted directly
    2.97  by any of the virtual machines.
    2.98  
    2.99  
   2.100 @@ -1176,9 +1173,11 @@ Now configure the NFS server to export t
   2.101  network by adding a line to \path{/etc/exports}, for instance:
   2.102  
   2.103  \begin{quote}
   2.104 +\begin{small}
   2.105  \begin{verbatim}
   2.106  /export/vm1root      1.2.3.4/24 (rw,sync,no_root_squash)
   2.107  \end{verbatim}
   2.108 +\end{small}
   2.109  \end{quote}
   2.110  
   2.111  Finally, configure the domain to use NFS root.  In addition to the
   2.112 @@ -1242,8 +1241,9 @@ Once \xend is running, more sophisticate
   2.113  using the xm tool (see Section~\ref{s:xm}) and the experimental
   2.114  Xensv web interface (see Section~\ref{s:xensv}).
   2.115  
   2.116 -As \xend runs, events will be logged to {\tt /var/log/xend.log} and
   2.117 -{\tt /var/log/xfrd.log}, and these may be useful for troubleshooting
   2.118 +As \xend runs, events will be logged to \path{/var/log/xend.log} and, 
   2.119 +if the migration assistant daemon (\path{xfrd}) has been started, 
   2.120 +\path{/var/log/xfrd.log}. These may be of use for troubleshooting
   2.121  problems.
   2.122  
   2.123  \section{Xm (command line interface)}
   2.124 @@ -1304,12 +1304,18 @@ Xensv is the experimental web control in
   2.125  machine.  It can be used to perform some (but not yet all) of the
   2.126  management tasks that can be done using the xm tool.
   2.127  
   2.128 -It can be started using:\\ \verb_# xensv start_ \\ and
   2.129 -stopped using: \verb_# xensv stop_ \\
   2.130 +It can be started using:
   2.131 +\begin{quote}
   2.132 +\verb_# xensv start_
   2.133 +\end{quote}
   2.134 +and stopped using: 
   2.135 +\begin{quote}
   2.136 +\verb_# xensv stop_
   2.137 +\end{quote}
   2.138  
   2.139  By default, Xensv will serve out the web interface on port 8080.  This
   2.140 -can be changed by editing {\tt
   2.141 -/usr/lib/python2.3/site-packages/xen/sv/params.py}.
   2.142 +can be changed by editing 
   2.143 +\path{/usr/lib/python2.3/site-packages/xen/sv/params.py}.
   2.144  
   2.145  Once Xensv is running, the web interface can be used to create and
   2.146  manage running domains.
   2.147 @@ -1329,7 +1335,8 @@ driver domain and general scheduling beh
   2.148  
   2.149  Xen configuration files contain the following standard variables.
   2.150  Unless otherwise stated, configuration items should be enclosed in
   2.151 -quotes: see \path{/etc/xen/xmexample1} for an example. 
   2.152 +quotes: see \path{/etc/xen/xmexample1} and \path{/etc/xen/xmexample2} 
   2.153 +for concrete examples of the syntax.
   2.154  
   2.155  \begin{description}
   2.156  \item[kernel] Path to the kernel image 
   2.157 @@ -1376,8 +1383,8 @@ vif = [ 'mac=aa:00:00:00:00:11, bridge=x
   2.158  
   2.159  For additional flexibility, it is also possible to include Python
   2.160  scripting commands in configuration files.  An example of this is the
   2.161 -\path{xmexample2} file, which uses Python code to handle the {\tt
   2.162 -vmid} variable.
   2.163 +\path{xmexample2} file, which uses Python code to handle the 
   2.164 +\path{vmid} variable.
   2.165  
   2.166  
   2.167  %\part{Advanced Topics}
   2.168 @@ -1668,7 +1675,7 @@ editing \path{grub.conf}.
   2.169  \item [com1=$<$baud$>$,DPS,$<$io\_base$>$,$<$irq$>$
   2.170   com2=$<$baud$>$,DPS,$<$io\_base$>$,$<$irq$>$ ] \mbox{}\\ 
   2.171   Xen supports up to two 16550-compatible serial ports.
   2.172 - For example: 'com1=9600,8n1,0x408,5' maps COM1 to a
   2.173 + For example: `com1=9600, 8n1, 0x408, 5' maps COM1 to a
   2.174   9600-baud port, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit,
   2.175   I/O port base 0x408, IRQ 5.
   2.176   If the I/O base and IRQ are standard (com1:0x3f8,4;
   2.177 @@ -1761,7 +1768,7 @@ specified a baud rate on the Xen command
   2.178  keyboard to get a list of supported commands.
   2.179  
   2.180  If you have a crash you'll likely get a crash dump containing an EIP
   2.181 -(PC) which, along with an 'objdump -d image', can be useful in
   2.182 +(PC) which, along with an \path{objdump -d image}, can be useful in
   2.183  figuring out what's happened.  Debug a Xenlinux image just as you
   2.184  would any other Linux kernel.
   2.185  
   2.186 @@ -1800,7 +1807,7 @@ The official Xen web site is found at:
   2.187  \end{quote}
   2.188  
   2.189  This contains links to the latest versions of all on-line 
   2.190 -documentation. 
   2.191 +documentation (including the lateset version of the FAQ). 
   2.192  
   2.193  \section{Mailing Lists}
   2.194