ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 2632:31706ae3b457

bitkeeper revision 1.1159.1.226 (416c755eE9F1jcmOpMGr6aA5jVhyZg)

Merge ssh://srg//auto/groups/xeno/BK/xeno-unstable.bk
into equilibrium.research:/home/irchomes/mwilli2/xeno-docs.bk
author mwilli2@equilibrium.research
date Wed Oct 13 00:22:54 2004 +0000 (2004-10-13)
parents 5acf9e0cea1d f83334f282f3
children 44ab932026a6
files docs/user.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/user.tex	Tue Oct 12 20:55:57 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/docs/user.tex	Wed Oct 13 00:22:54 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -423,10 +423,16 @@ title Xen 2.0 / XenLinux 2.6.8.1
     1.4  \end{verbatim}
     1.5  
     1.6  The first line of the configuration (kernel...) tells GRUB where to
     1.7 -find Xen itself and what boot parameters should be passed to it.  The
     1.8 -second line of the configuration describes the location of the
     1.9 +find Xen itself and what boot parameters should be passed to it (in
    1.10 +this case, setting domain 0's memory allocation and the settings for
    1.11 +the serial port).
    1.12 +
    1.13 +The second line of the configuration describes the location of the
    1.14  XenLinux kernel that Xen should start and the parameters that should
    1.15 -be passed to it.
    1.16 +be passed to it (these are standard Linux parameters, identifying the
    1.17 +root device and specifying it be initially mounted read only and
    1.18 +instructing that console output be sent both to the screen and to the
    1.19 +serial port).
    1.20  
    1.21  As always when installing a new kernel, it is recommended that you do
    1.22  not remove the original contents of \path{menu.lst} --- you may want
    1.23 @@ -532,7 +538,7 @@ receive its IP address from a DHCP serve
    1.24  
    1.25  You may also want to edit the {\bf vif} variable in order to choose
    1.26  the MAC address of the virtual ethernet interface yourself.  For
    1.27 -example: \\ \verb_vif = [`mac=00:06:AA:F6:BB:B3']_\\ If you do not set
    1.28 +example: \\ \verb_vif = ['mac=00:06:AA:F6:BB:B3']_\\ If you do not set
    1.29  this variable, Xend will automatically generate a random MAC address
    1.30  from an unused range.
    1.31  
    1.32 @@ -552,6 +558,37 @@ the {\tt xmdefconfig} file.  The tool us
    1.33  \path{/etc/xen/xmdefconfig} file, since no custom configuration file
    1.34  was specified on the command line.
    1.35  
    1.36 +\section{Starting / Stopping domains automatically}
    1.37 +
    1.38 +It is possible to have certain domains start automatically at boot
    1.39 +time and to have dom0 wait for all running domains to shutdown before
    1.40 +it shuts down the system.
    1.41 +
    1.42 +To specify a domain is to start at boot-time, place its
    1.43 +configuration file (or a link to it) under /etc/xen/auto/.
    1.44 +
    1.45 +A Sys-V style init script for RedHat and LSB-compliant systems is
    1.46 +provided and will be automatically copied to /etc/init.d/ during
    1.47 +install.  You can then enable it in the appriate way for your
    1.48 +distribution.
    1.49 +
    1.50 +For instance, on RedHat:
    1.51 +
    1.52 +\verb_# chkconfig --add xendomains_
    1.53 +
    1.54 +By default, this will start the boot-time domains in runlevels 3, 4
    1.55 +and 5.
    1.56 +
    1.57 +You can also use the "service" command to run this script manually, e.g:
    1.58 +
    1.59 +\verb_# service xendomains start_
    1.60 +
    1.61 +Starts all the domains with config files under /etc/xc/auto/.
    1.62 +
    1.63 +\verb_# service xendomains stop_
    1.64 +
    1.65 +Shuts down ALL running Xen domains.
    1.66 +
    1.67  \chapter{Domain management tasks}
    1.68  
    1.69  The previous chapter described a simple example of how to configure
    1.70 @@ -618,14 +655,14 @@ For example, to create a 2GB sparse file
    1.71  
    1.72  \verb_# dd if=/dev/zero of=vm1disk bs=1k seek=2048k count=1_
    1.73  
    1.74 -Choose a free loop back device, and attach file: \\
    1.75 -\verb_# losetup /dev/loop0 vm1disk_ \\
    1.76 -Make a file system on the loop back device: \\
    1.77 -\verb_# mkfs -t ext3 /dev/loop0_
    1.78 +Make a file system in the disk file: \\
    1.79 +\verb_# mkfs -t ext3 vm1disk_
    1.80 +
    1.81 +(when the tool asks for confirmation, answer `y')
    1.82  
    1.83  Populate the file system e.g. by copying from the current root:
    1.84  \begin{verbatim}
    1.85 -# mount /dev/loop0 /mnt
    1.86 +# mount vm1disk /mnt -o loop
    1.87  # cp -ax / /mnt
    1.88  \end{verbatim}
    1.89  Tailor the file system by editing \path{/etc/fstab},
    1.90 @@ -635,20 +672,16 @@ would edit \path{/mnt/etc/fstab} instead
    1.91  this example put \path{/dev/sda1} to root in fstab.
    1.92  
    1.93  Now unmount (this is important!):\\
    1.94 -\verb_# umount /dev/loop0_
    1.95 +\verb_# umount /mnt_
    1.96 +
    1.97 +And detach the file from its loop device:
    1.98  
    1.99  In the configuration file set:\\
   1.100 -\verb_disk = [`phy:loop0,sda1,w']_
   1.101 +\verb_disk = ['file:/full/path/to/vm1disk,sda1,w']_
   1.102  
   1.103  As the virtual machine writes to its `disk', the sparse file will be
   1.104  filled in and consume more space up to the original 2GB.
   1.105  
   1.106 -{\em NB.} You will need to use {\tt losetup} to bind the file to
   1.107 -\path{/dev/loop0} (or whatever loopback device you chose) each time
   1.108 -you reboot domain 0.  In the near future, Xend will track which loop
   1.109 -devices are currently free and do binding itself, making this manual
   1.110 -effort unnecessary.
   1.111 -
   1.112  \section{LVM-backed virtual block devices}
   1.113  
   1.114  XXX Put some simple examples here - would be nice if an LVM user could
   1.115 @@ -1120,14 +1153,14 @@ events within Xen for collection by cont
   1.116  software.  For more information see the chapter on debugging,
   1.117  in the Xen Interface Manual.
   1.118  
   1.119 -\chapter{Xen boot options}
   1.120 +\chapter{Boot options}
   1.121 +
   1.122 +\section{Xen boot options}
   1.123  
   1.124  These options are used to configure Xen's behaviour at runtime.  They
   1.125  should be appended to Xen's command line, either manually or by
   1.126  editing \path{grub.conf}.
   1.127  
   1.128 -\section{List of options}
   1.129 -
   1.130  {\bf ignorebiostables }\\
   1.131   Disable parsing of BIOS-supplied tables. This may help with some
   1.132   chipsets that aren't fully supported by Xen. If you specify this
   1.133 @@ -1227,6 +1260,16 @@ domain).  Device IDs should be given in 
   1.134  not need to be hidden --- they are hidden implicitly, since guest OSes
   1.135  do not need to configure them.
   1.136  
   1.137 +\section{XenLinux Options}
   1.138 +
   1.139 +{\bf xencons=xxx}
   1.140 +Specify the device node to
   1.141 +which the Xen virtual console driver is attached: \\
   1.142 + 'xencons=off': disable virtual console \\
   1.143 + 'xencons=tty': attach console to /dev/tty1 (tty0 at boot-time) \\
   1.144 + 'xencons=ttyS': attach console to /dev/ttyS0\\
   1.145 +The default is ttyS for dom0 and tty for all other domains.
   1.146 +
   1.147  \chapter{Further Support}
   1.148  
   1.149  If you have questions that are not answered by this manual, the
   1.150 @@ -1264,6 +1307,9 @@ discussions and requests for help.  Subs
   1.151  \item[xen-announce@lists.sourceforge.net] Used for announcements only.
   1.152  Subscribe at: \\
   1.153  {\tt http://lists.sourceforge.net/mailman/listinfo/xen-announce}
   1.154 +\item[xen-changelog@lists.sourceforge.net]  Changelog feed
   1.155 +from the unstable and 2.0 trees - developer oriented.  Subscribe at: \\
   1.156 +{\tt http://lists.sourceforge.net/mailman/listinfo/xen-changelog}
   1.157  \end{description}
   1.158  
   1.159  Although there is no specific user support list, the developers try to