ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 2342:30bc4c5fe838

bitkeeper revision 1.1159.1.103 (412bc218kciT4D3aKqRNpwgOiG2rGA)

Import doc fixes from Charles Coffing.
author maw48@labyrinth.cl.cam.ac.uk
date Tue Aug 24 22:32:56 2004 +0000 (2004-08-24)
parents d21069f49572
children bd470dc06d31
files docs/HOWTOs/XenDebugger-HOWTO docs/user.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/HOWTOs/XenDebugger-HOWTO	Tue Aug 24 20:06:36 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/docs/HOWTOs/XenDebugger-HOWTO	Tue Aug 24 22:32:56 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -55,16 +55,16 @@ Xen Configuration
     1.4       com2H   gdb stub should communicate on com2 (with high bit set)
     1.5  
     1.6    Symbolic debugging infomration is quite helpful too:
     1.7 -  xeno.bk/xen/arch/i386/Rules.mk
     1.8 +  xeno.bk/xen/arch/x86/Rules.mk
     1.9      add -g to CFLAGS to compile Xen with symbols
    1.10 -  xeno.bk/xenolinux-2.4.24-sparse/arch/xen/Makefile
    1.11 +  xeno.bk/linux-2.4.27-xen-sparse/arch/xen/Makefile
    1.12      add -g to CFLAGS to compile Linux with symbols
    1.13  
    1.14    You may also want to consider dedicating a register to the
    1.15    frame pointer (disable the -fomit-frame-pointer compile flag).
    1.16  
    1.17    When booting Xen and domain 0, look for the console text 
    1.18 -  "Initializing pervasive debugger (PDB)" just before DOM0 starts up.
    1.19 +  "pdb: pervasive debugger" just before DOM0 starts up.
    1.20  
    1.21  Serial Port Configuration
    1.22  
    1.23 @@ -144,10 +144,10 @@ 3. Attach with gdb
    1.24     (gdb) delete
    1.25     Delete all breakpoints? (y or n) y
    1.26  4. You can add additional symbols to gdb
    1.27 -   (gdb) add-sym xenolinux-2.4.24/vmlinux
    1.28 -   add symbol table from file "xenolinux-2.4.24/vmlinux" at
    1.29 +   (gdb) add-sym xeno.bk/linux-2.4.27-xen0/vmlinux
    1.30 +   add symbol table from file "xeno.bk/linux-2.4.27-xen0/vmlinux" at
    1.31     (y or n) y
    1.32 -   Reading symbols from xenolinux-2.4.24/vmlinux...done.
    1.33 +   Reading symbols from xeno.bk/linux-2.4.27-xen0/vmlinux...done.
    1.34     (gdb) x/s cpu_vendor_names[0]
    1.35     0xc01530d2 <cpdext+62898>:	 "Intel"
    1.36     (gdb) break free_uid
    1.37 @@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ processes, pdb currently supports just L
    1.38  
    1.39     define setup
    1.40        file xeno-clone/xeno.bk/xen/xen
    1.41 -      add-sym xeno-clone/xenolinux-2.4.25/vmlinux
    1.42 +      add-sym xeno-clone/xeno.bk/linux-2.4.27-xen0/vmlinux
    1.43        add-sym ~ach61/a.out
    1.44     end
    1.45  
    1.46 @@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ Some Helpful .gdbinit Commands
    1.47  
    1.48  define setup
    1.49    file    .../install/boot/xen-syms
    1.50 -  add-sym .../install/boot/vmlinux-syms-2.4.26-xen0
    1.51 +  add-sym .../install/boot/vmlinux-syms-2.4.27-xen0
    1.52    add-sym /homes/aho/a.out
    1.53  end
    1.54  document setup
     2.1 --- a/docs/user.tex	Tue Aug 24 20:06:36 2004 +0000
     2.2 +++ b/docs/user.tex	Tue Aug 24 22:32:56 2004 +0000
     2.3 @@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ at:\\
     2.4  {\tt http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/netos/papers/2003-xensosp.pdf}\\
     2.5  Work to port Xen to x86\_64 and IA64 is currently underway.
     2.6  
     2.7 -Xen is targetted at server-class machines, and the current list of
     2.8 +Xen is targeted at server-class machines, and the current list of
     2.9  supported hardware very much reflects this, avoiding the need for us
    2.10  to write drivers for "legacy" hardware. It is likely that some desktop
    2.11  chipsets will fail to work properly with the default Xen
    2.12 @@ -193,7 +193,7 @@ within a privileged guest OS rather than
    2.13  that we should be compatible with the majority of device hardware
    2.14  supported by Linux.  The default XenLinux build contains support for
    2.15  relatively modern server-class network and disk hardware, but you can
    2.16 -add suppport for other hardware by configuring your XenLinux kernel in
    2.17 +add support for other hardware by configuring your XenLinux kernel in
    2.18  the normal way (e.g. \verb_# make ARCH=xen xconfig_).
    2.19  
    2.20  \section{History}
    2.21 @@ -231,7 +231,7 @@ then, Xen has been extensively developed
    2.22  scenarios on multiple sites.
    2.23  
    2.24  Xen 2.0 is the latest release, featuring greatly enhanced hardware
    2.25 -support, configuration flexibility, useability and a larger complement
    2.26 +support, configuration flexibility, usability and a larger complement
    2.27  of supported operating systems.  We think that Xen has the potential
    2.28  to become {\em the} definitive open source virtualisation solution and
    2.29  will work to conclusively achieve that position.
    2.30 @@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ The Xen source code repository is struct
    2.31  \item[\path{tools/}] Xen node controller daemon (Xend), command line tools, 
    2.32    control libraries
    2.33  \item[\path{xen/}] The Xen hypervisor itself.
    2.34 -\item[\path{linux-2.4.26-xen/}] Linux 2.4 support for Xen
    2.35 +\item[\path{linux-2.4.27-xen/}] Linux 2.4 support for Xen
    2.36  \item[\path{linux-2.6.7-xen/}] Linux 2.6 support for Xen
    2.37  \item[\path{doc/}] various documentation files for users and developers
    2.38  \item[\path{extras/}] currently this contains the Mini OS, aimed at developers
    2.39 @@ -354,7 +354,7 @@ more complicated. The makefile needs a `
    2.40  which it will then add the Xen architecture files to. You can tell the
    2.41  makefile the location of the appropriate linux compressed tar file by
    2.42  setting the LINUX\_SRC environment variable, e.g. \\
    2.43 -\verb!# LINUX_SRC=/tmp/linux-2.4.26.tar.gz make world! \\ or by
    2.44 +\verb!# LINUX_SRC=/tmp/linux-2.4.27.tar.gz make world! \\ or by
    2.45  placing the tar file somewhere in the search path of {\tt LINUX\_SRC\_PATH}
    2.46  which defaults to ``{\tt .:..}". If the makefile can't find a suitable
    2.47  kernel tar file it attempts to download it from kernel.org (this won't
    2.48 @@ -385,8 +385,8 @@ destinations.
    2.49  Take a look at the files in \path{install/boot/}:
    2.50  \begin{itemize}
    2.51  \item \path{install/boot/xen.gz} The Xen 'kernel'
    2.52 -\item \path{install/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.26-xen0}  Domain 0 XenLinux kernel
    2.53 -\item \path{install/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.26-xenU}  Unprivileged XenLinux kernel
    2.54 +\item \path{install/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.27-xen0}  Domain 0 XenLinux kernel
    2.55 +\item \path{install/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.27-xenU}  Unprivileged XenLinux kernel
    2.56  \end{itemize}
    2.57  
    2.58  The difference between the two Linux kernels that are built is due to
    2.59 @@ -400,7 +400,7 @@ domains.
    2.60  The \path{install/boot} directory will also contain the config files
    2.61  used for building the XenLinux kernels, and also versions of Xen and
    2.62  XenLinux kernels that contain debug symbols (\path{xen-syms} and
    2.63 -\path{vmlinux-syms-2.4.26-xen0}) which are essential for interpreting crash
    2.64 +\path{vmlinux-syms-2.4.27-xen0}) which are essential for interpreting crash
    2.65  dumps.  Retain these files as the developers may wish to see them if
    2.66  you post on the mailing list.
    2.67  
    2.68 @@ -414,15 +414,15 @@ This file is sometimes called \path{menu
    2.69  distribution.  The entry should look something like the following:
    2.70  
    2.71  \begin{verbatim}
    2.72 -title Xen 2.0 / XenoLinux 2.4.26
    2.73 +title Xen 2.0 / XenLinux 2.4.27
    2.74    kernel /boot/xen.gz dom0_mem=131072 com1=115200,8n1
    2.75 -  module /boot/xenolinux.gz root=/dev/sda4 ro console=tty0 console=ttyS0
    2.76 +  module /boot/vmlinuz-2.4.27-xen0 root=/dev/sda4 ro console=tty0 console=ttyS0
    2.77  \end{verbatim}
    2.78  
    2.79  The first line of the configuration (kernel...) tells GRUB where to
    2.80  find Xen itself and what boot parameters should be passed to it.  The
    2.81  second line of the configuration describes the location of the
    2.82 -XenoLinux kernel that Xen should start and the parameters that should
    2.83 +XenLinux kernel that Xen should start and the parameters that should
    2.84  be passed to it.
    2.85  
    2.86  As always when installing a new kernel, it is recommended that you do
    2.87 @@ -505,7 +505,7 @@ At minimum, you should edit the followin
    2.88  \begin{description}
    2.89  \item[kernel] Set this to the path of the kernel you compiled for use
    2.90                with Xen. [e.g. {\tt kernel =
    2.91 -              '/root/xeno-unstable.bk/install/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.26-xenU'}]
    2.92 +              '/root/xeno-unstable.bk/install/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.27-xenU'}]
    2.93  \item[memory] Set this to the size of the domain's memory in
    2.94  megabytes. [e.g. {\tt memory = 64 } ]
    2.95  \item[disk] Set the first entry in this list to calculate the offset
    2.96 @@ -608,7 +608,7 @@ For example, to create a 2GB sparse file
    2.97  Choose a free loop back device, and attach file: \\
    2.98  \verb_# losetup /dev/loop0 vm1disk_ \\
    2.99  Make a file system on the loop back device: \\
   2.100 -\verb_# mkfs ­t ext3 /dev/loop0_
   2.101 +\verb_# mkfs -t ext3 /dev/loop0_
   2.102  
   2.103  Populate the file system e.g. by copying from the current root:
   2.104  \begin{verbatim}
   2.105 @@ -660,7 +660,7 @@ Xen configuration files contain the foll
   2.106  \item[nics] Number of virtual network interfaces.
   2.107  \item[vif] List of MAC addresses (random addresses are assigned if not given).
   2.108  \item[disk] Regions of disk to export to the domain.
   2.109 -\item[dhcp] Set to {\tt 'dhcp'} if you want to DHCP allocate the IP addres.
   2.110 +\item[dhcp] Set to {\tt 'dhcp'} if you want to DHCP allocate the IP address.
   2.111  \item[netmask] IP netmask.
   2.112  \item[gateway] IP address for the gateway (if any).
   2.113  \item[hostname] Set the hostname for the virtual machine.
   2.114 @@ -780,7 +780,7 @@ The available commands are as follows:
   2.115                             of the CPU, with timeliness guarantees and a
   2.116                             mechanism for sharing out ``slack time''.
   2.117  
   2.118 -\item[BVT]                 The BVT scheduler is used to give propotional
   2.119 +\item[BVT]                 The BVT scheduler is used to give proportional
   2.120                             fair shares of the CPU to domains.
   2.121  
   2.122  \item[Exokernel]           A minimal piece of privileged code, similar to
   2.123 @@ -812,7 +812,7 @@ The available commands are as follows:
   2.124                             the system.
   2.125  
   2.126  \item[Domain ID]           A unique identifier for a { \bf domain },
   2.127 -                           analagous to a process ID in an operating
   2.128 +                           analogous to a process ID in an operating
   2.129                             system.  Apart from domain
   2.130  
   2.131  \item[Full virtualisation] An approach to virtualisation which
   2.132 @@ -922,8 +922,8 @@ bridging setups.
   2.133  
   2.134  Xen offers a boot time choice between multiple schedulers.  To select
   2.135  a scheduler, pass the boot parameter { \tt sched=sched\_name } to Xen,
   2.136 -substituting the apropriate scheduler name.  Details of the schedulers
   2.137 -and their parameters are included below; future verions of the tools
   2.138 +substituting the appropriate scheduler name.  Details of the schedulers
   2.139 +and their parameters are included below; future versions of the tools
   2.140  will provide a higher-level interface to these tools.
   2.141  
   2.142  \section{Borrowed Virtual Time}
   2.143 @@ -1111,7 +1111,7 @@ in the Xen Interface Manual.
   2.144  
   2.145  These options are used to configure Xen's behaviour at runtime.  They
   2.146  should be appended to Xen's command line, either manually or by
   2.147 -editting \path{grub.conf}.
   2.148 +editing \path{grub.conf}.
   2.149  
   2.150  \section{List of options}
   2.151  
   2.152 @@ -1171,7 +1171,7 @@ editting \path{grub.conf}.
   2.153     have MSB cleared.
   2.154  \end{description}
   2.155   The latter two examples allow a single port to be
   2.156 - shared by two subsystems (eg. console and
   2.157 + shared by two subsystems (e.g. console and
   2.158   debugger). Sharing is controlled by MSB of each
   2.159   transmitted/received character.
   2.160   [NB. Default for this option is 'com1,tty'] \\
   2.161 @@ -1258,3 +1258,4 @@ assist users who post on xen-devel.  As 
   2.162  list increases, a dedicated user support list may be introduced.
   2.163  
   2.164  \end{document}
   2.165 +