ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 1995:22fde04122e6

bitkeeper revision 1.1108.33.11 (410941b0RCh83vYNlD7QJ-O9mIFT3A)

More updates.
author mwilli2@equilibrium.research.intel-research.net
date Thu Jul 29 18:28:00 2004 +0000 (2004-07-29)
parents 541e28a374a6
children f0e72440d964 04278c6bb55d
files docs/user.tex
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/user.tex	Thu Jul 29 16:59:25 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/docs/user.tex	Thu Jul 29 18:28:00 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -354,8 +354,8 @@ more complicated. The makefile needs a `
     1.4  which it will then add the Xen architecture files to. You can tell the
     1.5  makefile the location of the appropriate linux compressed tar file by
     1.6  setting the LINUX\_SRC environment variable, e.g. \\
     1.7 -\verb!# LINUX\_SRC=/tmp/linux-2.4.26.tar.gz make world! \\ or by
     1.8 -placing the tar file somewhere in the search path of LINUX\_SRC\_PATH
     1.9 +\verb!# LINUX_SRC=/tmp/linux-2.4.26.tar.gz make world! \\ or by
    1.10 +placing the tar file somewhere in the search path of {\tt LINUX\_SRC\_PATH}
    1.11  which defaults to ``{\tt .:..}". If the makefile can't find a suitable
    1.12  kernel tar file it attempts to download it from kernel.org (this won't
    1.13  work if you're behind a firewall).
    1.14 @@ -368,7 +368,7 @@ first virtual machine (``domain 0''), an
    1.15  extension that just contains virtual-device drivers.
    1.16  
    1.17  The procedure is similar to build the Linux 2.6 port: \\
    1.18 -\verb!# LINUX\_SRC=/path/to/linux2.6/source make linux26!
    1.19 +\verb!# LINUX_SRC=/path/to/linux2.6/source make linux26!
    1.20  
    1.21  In both cases, if you have an SMP machine you may wish to give the
    1.22  {\tt '-j4'} argument to make to get a parallel build.
    1.23 @@ -476,11 +476,14 @@ are installed before you proceed.
    1.24  
    1.25  \section{From the web interface}
    1.26  
    1.27 -\begin{itemize}
    1.28 -\item Boot the Xen machine and start Xend
    1.29 -\item Point your web browser at {\tt http://your\_machine:8080/}
    1.30 -\item XXX More explanation needed here...
    1.31 -\end{itemize}
    1.32 +Boot the Xen machine and start Xensv (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xensv} for
    1.33 +more details) using the command: \\
    1.34 +\verb_# xensv start_ \\
    1.35 +This will also start Xend (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xend} for more information).
    1.36 +
    1.37 +The domain management interface will then be available at {\tt
    1.38 +http://your\_machine:8080/}.  This provides a user friendly wizard for
    1.39 +starting domains and functions for managing running domains.
    1.40  
    1.41  \section{From the command line}
    1.42  
    1.43 @@ -579,9 +582,7 @@ The output of {\tt xm list} is in rows o
    1.44  
    1.45  The {\tt xm list} command also supports a long output format when the
    1.46  {\tt -l} switch is used.  This outputs the fulls details of the
    1.47 -running domains in SXP format.
    1.48 -
    1.49 - XXX More explanation needed here...
    1.50 +running domains in Xend's SXP configuration format.
    1.51  
    1.52  \chapter{Other kinds of storage}
    1.53  
    1.54 @@ -680,6 +681,51 @@ It is also possible to include Python sc
    1.55  configuration files.  This is done in the \path{xmdefaults} file in
    1.56  order to handle the {\tt vmid} variable.
    1.57  
    1.58 +
    1.59 +\chapter{Xend (Node control daemon)}
    1.60 +\label{cha:xensv}
    1.61 +
    1.62 +The Xen Daemon (Xend) performs system management functions related to
    1.63 +virtual machines.  It forms a central point of control for a machine
    1.64 +and can be controlled using an HTTP-based protocol.  Xend must be
    1.65 +running in order to start and manage virtual machines.
    1.66 +
    1.67 +Xend must be run as root because it needs access to privileged system
    1.68 +management functions.  A small set of commands may be issued on the
    1.69 +Xend command line:
    1.70 +
    1.71 +\begin{tabular}{ll}
    1.72 +\verb_# xend start_ & start Xend, if not already running \\
    1.73 +\verb_# xend stop_  & stop Xend if already running       \\
    1.74 +\verb_# xend restart_ & restart Xend if running, otherwise start it \\
    1.75 +\end{tabular}
    1.76 +
    1.77 +An SysV init script called {\tt xend} is provided to start Xend at
    1.78 +boot time.  The {\tt make install} will install this script in
    1.79 +{\path{/etc/init.d} automatically.  To enable it, you can make
    1.80 +symbolic links in the appropriate runlevel directories or use the {\tt
    1.81 +chkconfig} tool, where available.
    1.82 +
    1.83 +Once Xend is running, more sophisticated administration can be done
    1.84 +using the Xensv web interface (see Chapter~\ref{cha:xensv}).
    1.85 +
    1.86 +\chapter{Xensv (Web interface server)}
    1.87 +\label{cha:xensv}
    1.88 +
    1.89 +Xensv is the server for the web control interface.  It can be started
    1.90 +using:\\
    1.91 +\verb_# xensv start_ \\
    1.92 +and stopped using:
    1.93 +\verb_# xensv stop_ \\
    1.94 +It will automatically start Xend if it is not already running.
    1.95 +
    1.96 +By default, Xensv will serve out the web interface on port 8080.  This
    1.97 +can be changed by editing {\tt
    1.98 +/usr/lib/python2.2/site-packages/xen/sv/params.py}.
    1.99 +
   1.100 +Once Xensv is running, the web interface can be used to manage running
   1.101 +domains and provides a user friendly domain creation wizard.
   1.102 +
   1.103  \chapter{The xm tool}
   1.104  \label{cha:xm}
   1.105  
   1.106 @@ -728,8 +774,6 @@ The available commands are as follows:
   1.107  
   1.108  \chapter{Glossary}
   1.109  
   1.110 -XXX More to add here
   1.111 -
   1.112  \begin{description}
   1.113  \item[Atropos]             One of the CPU schedulers provided by Xen.
   1.114                             Atropos provides domains with absolute shares
   1.115 @@ -739,6 +783,14 @@ XXX More to add here
   1.116  \item[BVT]                 The BVT scheduler is used to give propotional
   1.117                             fair shares of the CPU to domains.
   1.118  
   1.119 +\item[Exokernel]           A minimal piece of privileged code, similar to
   1.120 +                           a {\bf microkernel} but providing a more
   1.121 +			   `hardware-like' interface to the tasks it
   1.122 +			   manages.  This is similar to a paravirtualising
   1.123 +			   VMM like {\bf Xen} but was designed as a new
   1.124 +			   operating system structure, rather than
   1.125 +			   specifically to run multiple conventional OSs.
   1.126 +
   1.127  \item[FBVT]                A derivative of the { \bf BVT } scheduler that
   1.128                             aims to give better fairness performance to IO
   1.129  			   intensive domains in competition with CPU
   1.130 @@ -773,6 +825,16 @@ XXX More to add here
   1.131  			   since it is responsible for managing multiple
   1.132  			   ``supervisor'' kernels.
   1.133  
   1.134 +\item[Microkernel]         A small base of code running at the highest
   1.135 +                           hardware privilege level.  A microkernel is
   1.136 +			   responsible for sharing CPU and memory (and
   1.137 +			   sometimes other devices) between less
   1.138 +			   privileged tasks running on the system.
   1.139 +			   This is similar to a VMM, particularly a
   1.140 +			   {\bf paravirtualising} VMM but typically
   1.141 +			   addressing a different problem space and
   1.142 +			   providing different kind of interface.
   1.143 +
   1.144  \item[NetBSD/Xen]          A port of NetBSD to the Xen architecture.
   1.145  
   1.146  \item[Paravirtualisation]  An approach to virtualisation which requires