ia64/xen-unstable

changeset 2852:123bec0b692a

bitkeeper revision 1.1159.1.353 (418903a56T1yUvYK5LHeS6GM6mXZaw)

cunning fix
author smh22@tempest.cl.cam.ac.uk
date Wed Nov 03 16:13:25 2004 +0000 (2004-11-03)
parents 0956f3af9fd3
children 1cacaf908d8b 0d263b6cd810
files docs/src/user.tex linux-2.6.9-xen-sparse/arch/xen/i386/kernel/ioport.c
line diff
     1.1 --- a/docs/src/user.tex	Wed Nov 03 15:15:42 2004 +0000
     1.2 +++ b/docs/src/user.tex	Wed Nov 03 16:13:25 2004 +0000
     1.3 @@ -492,7 +492,7 @@ details of the {\tt xm} tool in Section~
     1.4  This example explains how to use the \path{xmdefconfig} file.  If you
     1.5  require a more complex setup, you will want to write a custom
     1.6  configuration file --- details of the configuration file formats are
     1.7 -included in Chapter~\ref{cha:config}.
     1.8 +included in Section~\ref{s:cfiles}. 
     1.9  
    1.10  The \path{xmexample1} file is a simple template configuration file
    1.11  for describing a single VM.
    1.12 @@ -503,9 +503,10 @@ to be reused for multiple virtual machin
    1.13  fills in parts of this template.
    1.14  
    1.15  Both of them can be found in \path{/etc/xen/}
    1.16 -\subsection{Editing \path{xmdefconfig}}
    1.17 +\section{Editing \path{xmdefconfig}}
    1.18  
    1.19 -At minimum, you should edit the following variables in \path{/etc/xen/xmdefconfig}:
    1.20 +At minimum, you should edit the following 
    1.21 +variables in \path{/etc/xen/xmdefconfig}:
    1.22  
    1.23  \begin{description}
    1.24  \item[kernel] Set this to the path of the kernel you compiled for use
    1.25 @@ -530,7 +531,7 @@ from an unused range.
    1.26  
    1.27  If you don't have a \path{xmdefconfig} file, simply create your own 
    1.28  by copying one of the \path{/etc/xen/xmexample} files.
    1.29 -\subsection{Starting the domain}
    1.30 +\section{Starting the domain}
    1.31  
    1.32  The {\tt xm} tool provides a variety of commands for managing domains.
    1.33  Use the {\tt create} command to start new domains.  To start the
    1.34 @@ -916,7 +917,7 @@ Once \xend is running, more sophisticate
    1.35  using the xm tool (see Section~\ref{s:xm}) and the experimental
    1.36  Xensv web interface (see Section~\ref{s:xensv}).
    1.37  
    1.38 -\section{The xm tool}
    1.39 +\section{Xm (Command line interface)}
    1.40  \label{s:xm}
    1.41  
    1.42  The xm tool is the primary tool for managing Xen from the console.
    1.43 @@ -1048,7 +1049,7 @@ scripting commands in configuration file
    1.44  
    1.45  %\part{Advanced Topics}
    1.46  
    1.47 -\chapter{Network Configuration}
    1.48 +\section{Network Configuration}
    1.49  
    1.50  For simple systems with a single ethernet interface with a simple
    1.51  configuration, the default installation should work `out of the
    1.52 @@ -1059,7 +1060,7 @@ some special configuration.
    1.53  The purpose of this chapter is to describe the mechanisms provided by
    1.54  \xend to allow a flexible configuration for Xen's virtual networking.
    1.55  
    1.56 -\section{Xen networking scripts}
    1.57 +\subsection{Xen networking scripts}
    1.58  
    1.59  Xen's virtual networking is configured by 3 shell scripts.  These are
    1.60  called automatically by \xend when certain events occur, with arguments
    1.61 @@ -1067,7 +1068,7 @@ to the scripts providing further context
    1.62  scripts are found by default in \path{/etc/xen}.  The names and
    1.63  locations of the scripts can be configured in \path{xend-config.sxp}.
    1.64  
    1.65 -\subsection{\path{network}}
    1.66 +\subsubsection{\path{network}}
    1.67  
    1.68  This script is called once when \xend is started and once when \xend is
    1.69  stopped.  Its job is to do any advance preparation required for the
    1.70 @@ -1085,7 +1086,7 @@ When \xend exits, this script is called 
    1.71  which causes it to delete the Xen bridge and remove {\tt eth0} from
    1.72  it, restoring the normal IP and routing configuration.
    1.73  
    1.74 -\subsection{\path{vif-bridge}}
    1.75 +\subsubsection{\path{vif-bridge}}
    1.76  
    1.77  This script is called for every domain virtual interface.  This should
    1.78  do things like configuring firewalling rules for that interface and
    1.79 @@ -1095,9 +1096,9 @@ By default, this adds and removes VIFs o
    1.80  This script can be customized to properly deal with more complicated
    1.81  bridging setups.
    1.82  
    1.83 -\chapter{Scheduler Configuration}
    1.84 +\section{Scheduler Configuration}
    1.85  
    1.86 -\section{Scheduler selection}
    1.87 +\subsection{Scheduler selection}
    1.88  
    1.89  Xen offers a boot time choice between multiple schedulers.  To select
    1.90  a scheduler, pass the boot parameter { \tt sched=sched\_name } to Xen,
    1.91 @@ -1110,7 +1111,7 @@ use the scheduler most appropriate to th
    1.92  scheduler is the recommended choice, since the Atropos scheduler is
    1.93  not finished.
    1.94  
    1.95 -\section{Borrowed Virtual Time}
    1.96 +\subsection{Borrowed Virtual Time}
    1.97  
    1.98  {\tt sched=bvt } (the default) \\ 
    1.99  
   1.100 @@ -1118,7 +1119,7 @@ BVT provides proportional fair shares of
   1.101  observed to penalise domains that block frequently (e.g. IO intensive
   1.102  domains), but this can be compensated by using warping. 
   1.103  
   1.104 -\subsection{Global Parameters}
   1.105 +\subsubsection{Global Parameters}
   1.106  
   1.107  \begin{description}
   1.108  \item[ctx\_allow]
   1.109 @@ -1128,7 +1129,7 @@ domains), but this can be compensated by
   1.110    pre-empted.  This prevents thrashing of the CPU.
   1.111  \end{description}
   1.112  
   1.113 -\subsection{Per-domain parameters}
   1.114 +\subsubsection{Per-domain parameters}
   1.115  
   1.116  \begin{description}
   1.117  \item[mcuadv]
   1.118 @@ -1145,7 +1146,7 @@ domains), but this can be compensated by
   1.119    run unwarped for before it can warp again
   1.120  \end{description}
   1.121  
   1.122 -\section{Atropos}
   1.123 +\subsection{Atropos}
   1.124  
   1.125  {\tt sched=atropos } \\
   1.126  
   1.127 @@ -1167,7 +1168,7 @@ Note: don't overcommit the CPU when usin
   1.128  more CPU than is available - the utilisation should be kept to
   1.129  slightly less than 100% in order to ensure predictable behaviour).
   1.130  
   1.131 -\subsection{Per-domain parameters}
   1.132 +\subsubsection{Per-domain parameters}
   1.133  
   1.134  \begin{description}
   1.135  \item[slice]
     2.1 --- a/linux-2.6.9-xen-sparse/arch/xen/i386/kernel/ioport.c	Wed Nov 03 15:15:42 2004 +0000
     2.2 +++ b/linux-2.6.9-xen-sparse/arch/xen/i386/kernel/ioport.c	Wed Nov 03 16:13:25 2004 +0000
     2.3 @@ -43,7 +43,9 @@ asmlinkage long sys_iopl(unsigned int ne
     2.4  
     2.5  asmlinkage long sys_ioperm(unsigned long from, unsigned long num, int turn_on)
     2.6  {
     2.7 +#if 0
     2.8  	printk(KERN_INFO "ioperm not fully supported - %s\n",
     2.9  		turn_on ? "set iopl to 3" : "ignore resource release");
    2.10 +#endif
    2.11  	return turn_on ? sys_iopl(3) : 0;
    2.12  }